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Lithium

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NEWS
July 1, 1993 | By Sid Holmes, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The state health department has declared another industrial site in East Whiteland a public health hazard because of chemicals contaminating ground water, but it was unable to say what the effect of drinking the water would be. Using data gathered from soil borings and ground water samples taken between four and five years ago, the Department of Health report has said that the site of the Foote Mineral Co. represents a health hazard to humans based...
NEWS
May 22, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lithium, a drug commonly prescribed for manic depression, may also slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to University of Pennsylvania scientists. The Penn researchers tested lithium on mice genetically engineered to develop a form of Alzheimer's disease. They found the drug prevented the buildup of protein deposits, called plaques, that are characteristic of Alzheimer's and perhaps responsible for the devastating mental decline associated with it. The findings are published in today's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
LOST IN SPACE Men, sexual desire truly spaces you out. When a man's sexual desire is at its highest, his spatial abilities - being able to solve problems such as arranging objects or finding hidden figures in complex designs - are at their lowest, according to a Canadian study reported at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. HEEDLESS DRINKERS Many of you still don't get it. Drinkers increasingly are noticing the warnings on alcoholic beverage containers, but the messages' sobering effects seem slight, according to studies presented at an American Public Health Association meeting.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press
TOKYO - All Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines said they replaced lithium-ion batteries in their Boeing 787 Dreamliners on multiple occasions before a battery-overheating incident led to the worldwide grounding of the jets. ANA said Wednesday that it replaced batteries on its 787 aircraft about 10 times because they failed to charge properly or showed other problems and that it informed Boeing about the swaps. Japan Airlines said it had also replaced lithium-ion batteries on its 787 jets, but couldn't immediately give details.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The closing is at least a year away, but concerns about the need for cleanup are hovering over Cyprus Foote Mineral Co. in Frazer nonetheless. The company has hired Weston Environmental Consultants of West Chester to conduct a study of the possible contamination at the property, and residents have launched their own study of sorts to determine just what Foote might leave behind when it goes. "We want to look into it, find out what's there," said one resident, Paula Kocher.
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William L. Dyson, 77, a successful surgeon who took up psychiatry when he was 50 and was one of the first doctors to use lithium to treat manic- depressive illness, died Wednesday at his home overlooking the second fairway at Pine Valley (N.J.) Golf Club. "He was one of the first people in Philadelphia to use (lithium)," said his wife, Susan Wise Dyson. She said he had read about its accidental discovery by an Australian doctor and began to use it at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine about 1966.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Malvern company with a long history in Chester County is closing its operations here and moving to North Carolina, a move that will cost 40 people their jobs. In June, Cyprus Foote Mineral will move its headquarters and research and development operations to Kings Mountain, N.C., one of four other U.S. facilities it operates. But the firm will continue to be involved in the cleanup of one of its Chester County properties, which was declared a hazardous-waste site last summer.
NEWS
July 18, 2010
The newest LED Sport Vest from Nite Ize makes walking or cycling at night safer. The lightweight, black nylon mesh vest has bright-red, battery-powered, LED- illuminated stripes front and back to announce your presence even in darkness. It has a white reflective stripe intended to make the wearer conspicuous in the glow of headlights or streetlights. This vest can be a lifesaver on unlit roads or at dusk. A power button at the shoulder controls whether the LED lights glow or flash.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
A relatively peaceful meeting of the East Whiteland supervisors turned tense Monday night when residents accused a board member of voting for the housing proposal of his former employer. After the board unanimously approved final plans for the 52-unit Wyckfield subdivision, a resident stood up and declared that Supervisor Ronald Knabb had once worked as an architect for developer Lewis Brandolini. "I can't believe you sat here and voted for your boss!" said Martin Lutz, a member of the Concerned Citizens of East Whiteland.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1987 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Foote Mineral Co. of Exton has decided to discontinue its efforts to find a buyer for the company. In the last two years, Foote Mineral, which supplies chemicals and metals to steel and foundry companies, has reported losses of more than $40 million and sales have slipped from $164 million in 1984 to $106 million in 1986. Last Thursday, the company reported that first-quarter sales slipped even further, dropping more than 24 percent below those of the first quarter of last year.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 10, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
FMC Corp., the Center City-based global chemical maker that plans to move its headquarters into a new 49-story tower in University City next year, has dropped plans to split into two companies. Instead, it plans deals that will increase FMC's focus on pesticides and other farm, food, and medical products, while unloading the largest of its remaining raw-materials businesses. Shares rose 0.8 percent, or 52 cents, in Monday trading, to $66.12, after FMC chief executive officer Pierre Brondeau detailed plans to buy Denmark-based pesticide maker Cheminova A/S for $1.8 billion, including $340 million in debt.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press
TOKYO - All Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines said they replaced lithium-ion batteries in their Boeing 787 Dreamliners on multiple occasions before a battery-overheating incident led to the worldwide grounding of the jets. ANA said Wednesday that it replaced batteries on its 787 aircraft about 10 times because they failed to charge properly or showed other problems and that it informed Boeing about the swaps. Japan Airlines said it had also replaced lithium-ion batteries on its 787 jets, but couldn't immediately give details.
NEWS
July 18, 2010
The newest LED Sport Vest from Nite Ize makes walking or cycling at night safer. The lightweight, black nylon mesh vest has bright-red, battery-powered, LED- illuminated stripes front and back to announce your presence even in darkness. It has a white reflective stripe intended to make the wearer conspicuous in the glow of headlights or streetlights. This vest can be a lifesaver on unlit roads or at dusk. A power button at the shoulder controls whether the LED lights glow or flash.
NEWS
July 9, 2004
Don't excuse Cheney Re: "In defense of well-deserved vulgarity," Commentary Page, July 5: Charles Krauthammer minimizes Vice President Cheney's unprovoked (and by all accounts unprecedented in Senate circles) outburst at Sen. Patrick Leahy by a cast-the-first-stone defense. In reality, 100 senators spend their careers in frequently vigorous disagreement without resort to language suited to inebriates at last call. To Krauthammer, Cheney's catcall has "earthy authenticity.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The developer of the Cyprus Foote Mineral Co. Superfund site has abandoned a proposal to begin work there ahead of a cleanup plan from federal regulators. That means work at the site will wait until the Environmental Protection Agency decides how the former lithium-processing plant in East Whiteland Township should be cleaned up. James Feeney, the EPA caseworker, could not be reached for comment yesterday. He has said that the final plan, which will address groundwater contamination and low levels of radioactive soil, could be ready in September.
NEWS
May 22, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lithium, a drug commonly prescribed for manic depression, may also slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to University of Pennsylvania scientists. The Penn researchers tested lithium on mice genetically engineered to develop a form of Alzheimer's disease. They found the drug prevented the buildup of protein deposits, called plaques, that are characteristic of Alzheimer's and perhaps responsible for the devastating mental decline associated with it. The findings are published in today's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
August 13, 1997 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If a "drug-induced psychosis" caused the explosive outburst that led Nicholas Borsello to murder his wife 13 years ago, it wasn't a prescribed drug that did the damage, a forensic psychiatrist testified yesterday in Delaware County Court. Instead, said Perry A. Berman, Borsello likely committed the killing under emotional duress heightened by stimulants not prescribed by a doctor. "I believe that he killed her in a moment of extreme heat of passion, at an emotionally aroused level, which was augmented by methamphetamines," Berman, a private psychiatrist who also advises the Philadelphia Public Defenders' Office, told jurors in the second day of a civil trial.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Malvern company with a long history in Chester County is closing its operations here and moving to North Carolina, a move that will cost 40 people their jobs. In June, Cyprus Foote Mineral will move its headquarters and research and development operations to Kings Mountain, N.C., one of four other U.S. facilities it operates. But the firm will continue to be involved in the cleanup of one of its Chester County properties, which was declared a hazardous-waste site last summer.
NEWS
July 1, 1993 | By Sid Holmes, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The state health department has declared another industrial site in East Whiteland a public health hazard because of chemicals contaminating ground water, but it was unable to say what the effect of drinking the water would be. Using data gathered from soil borings and ground water samples taken between four and five years ago, the Department of Health report has said that the site of the Foote Mineral Co. represents a health hazard to humans based...
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William L. Dyson, 77, a successful surgeon who took up psychiatry when he was 50 and was one of the first doctors to use lithium to treat manic- depressive illness, died Wednesday at his home overlooking the second fairway at Pine Valley (N.J.) Golf Club. "He was one of the first people in Philadelphia to use (lithium)," said his wife, Susan Wise Dyson. She said he had read about its accidental discovery by an Australian doctor and began to use it at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine about 1966.
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