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Litter

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NEWS
October 10, 2011 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
KAREN KANE thought that a"Circular Free Property" sticker from the city meant that the days of returning from work to find take-out menus and unwanted coupons scattered near her Port Richmond home were over. She was wrong. The ads and menus kept coming after she happily slapped the sticker on her screen door about two years ago, even though disobeying the sticker's order carries a $100 fine for the business distributing the unsolicited junk. "Not only do they deliver to our doors, but they throw the menus all over the street," she said.
NEWS
August 24, 2011
AFTER READING a Daily News cover story urging Philadelphians to join the fight against litter and illegal dumping, longtime 102.9 WMGK morning radio host John DeBella will remove trash from the Montgomery Drive exit off I-76 this morning. Q: What about the story made you want to pick up trash from the side of the road? A: I saw it on the front cover . . . within the week, I'm driving out of the city - back out to Bala - so I said I'll just get off at Montgomery Drive.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden City Council adopted a more stringent litter ordinance yesterday that gives the city the power to fine or jail people who abandon their cars and discard old tires in unauthorized places. The stricter ordinance also will make the city eligible for $85,000 in state funding through the Clean Cities Act, which provides money for receptacles and cleanup crews. Once Camden gets the money, it will hire youths to sweep and pick up rubbish, and will put trash receptacles every quarter mile in commercial zones.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
JOETTA JOHNSON hops in my car and points ahead. Drive, she says. We're going tire hunting. Johnson, for those of you who are new to this space, is one of the women of North Sydenham Street, a feisty group of we-will-not-be-ignoreds I wrote about when they diverted Mayor Nutter to their block to deal with a long list of long-standing issues. Their strategy mostly worked, except for Jenesta Jones still waiting for the city to seal the exterior wall she was left with after an adjoining home was taken down.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
It could end up being the biggest party in South Philadelphia since the Mummers strutted up Broad Street on New Year's Day. Well, maybe not exactly a party . . . On Saturday at 9 a.m. at least 200 South Philadelphians, including dozens of volunteers from the nearby Philadelphia Navy Base, are expected to descend on South Philadelphia's biggest recreation area, Franklin D. Roosevelt Park on South Broad Street. Their daylong mission: to clean up the place and try to restore it to the days, decades ago, when the big city park teemed with happy families, strollers, fishermen, boaters and picnickers.
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | By JANE AMARI, Los Angeles Daily News
It's impossible to talk about Rome without talking about cats. The cats of Rome are everywhere. They bed down in the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. They scamper over the crumbling columns of Piazza Argentina. They meander languidly down city streets, intent on their own affairs, ignoring the humans. They stand as silent sentinels at the Pyramid, near the Protestant cemetery where Shelley, Keats and Byron are buried. They are, it is said in the city, master mechanics. They know at 50 feet if the engine - and hence the warmest part - of a recently parked car is in the front or the back.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Caln Township manager had trash on his mind last week. Mostly, he was thinking of ways to stop it. For years, township manager Samuel Moore said, litter has been blowing from the Jamesway shopping center across Municipal Drive onto the township's park and ballfields. "We clean that park daily, sometimes twice a day, and it just looks like a pigpen from the litter," he said. "There's no question where it's coming from - it's coming from the shopping center. " Wrappers, waste paper and even money blows across the road, ending up in the Little League dugouts, Moore said at Wednesday's Board of Commissioners meeting.
NEWS
April 30, 1986 | BY JOAN SPECTER
Have you ever been hit by a UFO? No, I'm not referring to aliens from outer space, but rather to flying objects of this planet - stone pellets, metal pieces, paper products and other loose material carried by truckers who fail to cover their cargoes. Because of their negligence, loads of this sort often wind up spewn all over our highways, littering our neighborhoods, and damaging a windshield or two along the way. In order to prevent these dangerous and often aggravating occurrences, I recently introduced a resolution in City Council calling for Council's support of State Senate Bill 1381 and State House Bill 2152, introduced by Sen. Frank Salvatore and Rep. Fran Weston respectively.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Penny Jeannechild, Special to The Inquirer
Litter isn't his life, but Adm. Jim Eckelberger has made it his duty. "Everyone is waiting for someone else to do the job, whether it's litter that needs picking up, a letter that should get an answer or a phone call left unreturned," said Eckelberger. "So the issue is not just trash. "The issue is, 'What am I responsible for?' " The admiral, who commands the Navy Aviation Supply Office (ASO) at 700 Robbins Ave., has announced his responsibility by hanging a boast at the compound's Oxford Avenue entrance.
NEWS
August 16, 1991 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Immaculately dressed and precisely coiffed, Georges Perrier stood in the alley behind his Center City restaurant and gestured hotly at the trash lining his neighbors' sidewalks. Next door, heaps of tiny, white styrofoam packaging fillers spilled into the street. Down the block, soggy cardboard boxes piled up next to a dumpster. But the space behind Perrier's Le Bec-Fin was clean and getting cleaner as an employee hosed down the walk. Perrier pointed this out to litter cop Anthony Gordy with French-accented despair.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 2016
By Michelle Feldman and Beth McConnell No matter the neighborhood, Philadelphians are frustrated by the constant battle against litter and illegal dumping. Our neighborhood commercial corridors, residential blocks, parks, and playgrounds should be clean and free of debris that is unattractive and unsafe, and can hinder economic development and community pride. Active and engaged residents and businesses that work to improve our neighborhoods, including community-based organizations ranging from civic associations to community development corporations and business improvement districts, need support to win the battle against litter.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY RYAN BRIGGS, The Next Mayor rbriggs@philly.com
THIS IS the second in a series that The Next Mayor project is embarking on throughout the summer that looks at some of the problems facing Philadelphia's next mayor. We'll identify problems, examine why they exist, and find best practices implemented elsewhere. At the end of each piece, we'll offer a fix. The problem Talmadge Belo Jr. remembers North Philadelphia's golden days - a time when people washed the front steps of their tidy rowhouses, pitched in to sweep litter off the street and painted sidewalk curbs bright white.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
PHILADELPHIA didn't get the nickname Filthadelphia for nothing. Sidewalks, gutters, alleys and vacant lots across the city serve as litter zones for those who don't bother to find actual trash cans and recycling bins. Could it be that there are too few cans and bins in the city? City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown believes so, and yesterday introduced two bills that would require food businesses and some residential landlords to furnish their properties with trash cans and recycling bins.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
WITH LITTERING fines $150 a pop, the city's SWEEP (Streets & Walkways Education and Enforcement Program) tries to keep things clean, but it's still far from meeting its goal. In his latest economic report, City Controller Alan Butkovitz said yesterday that the city collected $5.1 million in fiscal year 2014, which ended June 30, in fines of people for improperly disposing of garbage, rubbish, refuse and plain old litter. It has collected a total of $26 million since 2009, but many more millions go uncollected, he said - almost $70 million since 2009, according to an agency receivables report by the Revenue Department.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
ILLEGAL DUMPING is nothing new in Philadelphia, but even the most discreet of muck miscreants had managed to keep it to vacant lots and side alleys. But in recent years, Deputy Streets Commissioner Donald Carlton said problems with illegal dumping have seeped into the city's downtown business corridors and shopping avenues, making those who have to witness it bitter about litter. Of the 900 public litter baskets on street corners across the city, he said many are being used as household garbage receptacles when they are intended to give residents and visitors a place to stash their trash.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
JOETTA JOHNSON hops in my car and points ahead. Drive, she says. We're going tire hunting. Johnson, for those of you who are new to this space, is one of the women of North Sydenham Street, a feisty group of we-will-not-be-ignoreds I wrote about when they diverted Mayor Nutter to their block to deal with a long list of long-standing issues. Their strategy mostly worked, except for Jenesta Jones still waiting for the city to seal the exterior wall she was left with after an adjoining home was taken down.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When Jerry and Barbara Cohen of Jenkintown received a $150 citation in the mail from the City of Philadelphia in May for leaving litter on a Queen Village street, they ignored it. Couldn't be them. They had not been in the city in months. But when they received a second notice - with a $40 late penalty tacked on - in September, they took notice. Jerry Cohen called the city to explain and complain. The response he got was indisputable: City workers had found a Tuesday Morning catalog with his wife's name and their address on it in one of five trash bags that someone had left at Fifth and Bainbridge Streets in May. They even had photos of the catalog to prove it. The workers also found the names and addresses of three other people.
NEWS
September 24, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IF EAGLES WIDE receiver Riley Cooper provided a viral-video reminder by dropping the n-word at a Kenny Chesney concert, the head of the Coatesville Area School District and the high-school athletic director have added the exclamation point - lots of exclamation points. This is not the country the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had a dream about 50 years ago. Post-racial America? Yeah, right. Look no further than the text messages between then-Superintendent Richard Como and then- director of athletics and activities Jim Donato, which were leaked to the Chester County District Attorney's Office and include dozens of uses of racial epithets, according to a transcript.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
OFFICERS WHO visited a Logan home to deliver an arrest warrant yesterday morning found no working toilets, feces and trash strewn around, and other conditions so deplorable that they removed the three young girls who lived there. Several detectives went to the rowhouse on 9th Street near Rockland just after 9 a.m. to arrest a woman there for an unrelated domestic assault, police Capt. Jack Fleming said. But the home was so filthy that the officers alerted their supervisors, who called in special-victims investigators and the city's Department of Human Services.
SPORTS
March 31, 2013
The Dubai World Cup Meydan, Race 9 - Post 2:05; $10 million (Grade I), about 1 1/4 miles, 3 y.o. & up 1. Treasure Beach. . . Christophe Soumillon. . . 20-1 2. Red Cadeaux. . . Gerald Mosse. . . 30-1 3. Dullahan. . . Gary Stevens. . . 6-1 4. Hunter's Light. . . Silvestre De Sousa. . . 7-2 5. Capponi. . . Ahmad Ajtebi. . . 20-1 6. Side Glance. . . Jamie Spencer. . . 30-1 7. Planteur. . . Ryan Moore. . . 30-1 8. Royal Delta. . . Mike Smith. . . 4-1 9. Meandre.
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