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Liver Disease

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NEWS
June 11, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Singer and pianist Ray Charles, 73, whose ebullient recordings melded jazz, blues, gospel and R&B into the basic DNA of soul music, died of acute liver disease yesterday morning at his Beverly Hills home. The dapper dynamo, blind since age 7, had been in declining health since hip-replacement surgery last year. He made his last public appearance at an April 30 ceremony to designate his Los Angeles studio a historic landmark. "He was a fabulous man, full of humor and wit," Aretha Franklin said of Mr. Charles, whose hits included "Georgia on My Mind," "Hit the Road Jack," "Busted," and "I Can't Stop Loving You. " "And, of course, he introduced the world to secular soul singing.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia researchers have begun using gene therapy to treat an inherited liver disease that kills most victims before they are old enough to vote. The experimental treatment may someday lead to a cure for the half million Americans who have high cholesterol because of a milder form of the disease. The treatment was completed on the first patient at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania on Monday. "At this time, our patient is doing very well, with no signs of complications," said James Wilson, director of Penn's Institute for Human Gene Therapy.
NEWS
February 27, 2002 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Death-row inmate Frederick A. Thomas finally got his day in court yesterday to try to prove that he was not involved in the 1993 slaying of a FedEx courier, and the first witness backed him up, testifying that the killer was a local drug dealer named "Little Man. " Thomas, 56, who is dying of liver disease, was convicted and sentenced to death in 1995 for the December 1993 shooting death of the courier, William "Skip" Moyer Jr. of Delaware County....
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The surgeon slipped his hands into the patient's chest cavity and slid out a shrunken, hard, grayish liver. He held it in his palms so George Casey, a Philadelphia firefighter watching the operation, could take a closer look. "This is what hepatitis C does to you," said Cosme Manzarbeitia, director of the transplant program at Albert Einstein Medical Center. "It's bumpy and disgusting. " With only his ice-blue eyes showing above a surgical mask, Casey blinked hard. He wanted to see a liver transplant because so many members of his union were infected with the virus that causes hepatitis C. Standing beside the operating table, he thought about Franny and Norm and Mary - firefighters and friends.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Dr. Nancy Young, For The Inquirer
A middle-aged man came to Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia after enduring seven months of diarrhea and joint pain. He'd lost a great deal of weight, even though his diet was normal. A physical examination showed him to be severely debilitated, with muscle wasting and a markedly distended abdomen. Four liters of fluid were removed from his abdomen for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. The most common causes of that kind of fluid accumulation - called ascites - are liver disease, kidney disease, and malignancy.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Charitha Gowda and Vincent Lo Re III, For The Inquirer
'I'm more tired than usual, doctor," the patient said, though she really thought nothing was wrong. At 60, she assumed age was catching up with her, and was at the doctor's office for her routine checkup. Indeed, all her blood work was normal - except for the panel revealing elevated liver enzymes. A liver ultrasound suggested the damage had been going on for some time. Aside from hypertension, she had no other active medical conditions. The only drugs she took were a diuretic and a multivitamin.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
When surgeons at St. Agnes Medical Center operated on Cardinal John Krol in May, they were able to stem the internal bleeding that had felled the leader of nearly 1.3 million Catholics in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. But Krol's doctors didn't disclose the underlying cause of the condition that they treated surgically, a condition that is generally a symptom of liver disease. Krol was treated for varicose veins of the esophagus (the muscular tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach)
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Experts on liver disease will meet today in Philadelphia to promote workplace screening for hepatitis B and C, diseases that can cause liver failure and cancer but often have no symptoms for years. So far, such screening, which costs $40 a person, has been done primarily for workers in high-risk occupations such as health care, said Deborah Katz, director of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the American Liver Foundation. She argues that other types of businesses should be offering the blood tests, as well.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: Please comment on the pros and cons of undergoing surgery for insertion of a shunt to eliminate or reduce ascites due to liver disease. A: Ascites is the accumulation of excess fluid in the abdominal cavity. It is commonly due to liver disease, which interrupts normal venous blood flow. For a variety of complex reasons, this causes massive leakage of clear fluid (serum) into the abdomen. Ascites can also be caused by heart disorders and kidney failure. Symptoms of ascites are enlarging girth, abdominal discomfort and - in its severest form - difficulty breathing.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Francis "Frank" A. Zampiello, 75, of Philadelphia, an early advocate for better health care through his work with the U.S. Public Health Service, died Thursday, Dec. 1, at home of complications from autoimmune liver disease. Before retiring, Dr. Zampiello was national director of the Quality Center in the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Primary Health Care, where he served from 1997 until 2002. In that role, he worked to reduce errors and increase efficiency in the nation's health-care delivery.
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NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Charitha Gowda and Vincent Lo Re III, For The Inquirer
'I'm more tired than usual, doctor," the patient said, though she really thought nothing was wrong. At 60, she assumed age was catching up with her, and was at the doctor's office for her routine checkup. Indeed, all her blood work was normal - except for the panel revealing elevated liver enzymes. A liver ultrasound suggested the damage had been going on for some time. Aside from hypertension, she had no other active medical conditions. The only drugs she took were a diuretic and a multivitamin.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Dr. Nancy Young, For The Inquirer
A middle-aged man came to Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia after enduring seven months of diarrhea and joint pain. He'd lost a great deal of weight, even though his diet was normal. A physical examination showed him to be severely debilitated, with muscle wasting and a markedly distended abdomen. Four liters of fluid were removed from his abdomen for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. The most common causes of that kind of fluid accumulation - called ascites - are liver disease, kidney disease, and malignancy.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Services will be held Tuesday, Dec. 23, for Phyllis Jean Lewis Prible, 82, a longtime resident of Malvern and a world traveler who died at home Friday, Nov. 14, of complications from liver disease. Born in Huntington, Ind., to Roscoe R. and Mildred Lewis, Mrs. Prible moved to Malvern in 1967 and remained there for 47 years. Her life was centered on her family. She and husband, Glen V. Prible, were four days short of celebrating their 64th anniversary. They had never spent an anniversary apart, said her daughter Susan P. Warmuth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
BOBBY Rydell readily admits that the Daily News already should have published his obituary. "You're not being overdramatic whatsoever," he responded, when asked if it would be too much to say that, logically speaking, he should be dead. "I [needed] a liver transplant, then found out I was going into renal failure and needed a kidney transplant - which, fortunately, boosted me up on the transplant [waiting] list. " The dire recollection of his July 2012 double-transplant surgery, proffered in the Eagles- and Phillies-decorated den of Rydell's Lower Merion home, was not at all hyperbolic.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catherine M. Blumstein, 51, of Berwyn, a former principal and grade-school teacher at SS. Colman-John Neumann School in Bryn Mawr, died Thursday, April 11, of complications of liver disease at home. "She had a lot of energy and she loved teaching children," said her husband, Lewis. Mrs. Blumstein's teaching career was from 1984 to 2012. During those years she taught students in third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh grades. She was an advocate for the use of technology in the classroom, her husband said.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
Joan Mulhern, 51, a forceful advocate for the environment who lobbied Congress and often rallied public support to sway lawmakers to her cause, died Dec. 18 of liver disease at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington. Her death was relayed by a sister, Marie Mulhern. Ms. Mulhern had been the senior legislative counsel for Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental law firm, since 1999. She fought repeated attempts by Congress to limit the scope of the Clean Water Act and battled coal companies and government officials over mountaintop-removal coal mining, in which mountains are blasted away to create strip mines.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roughly two million to three million baby boomers are chronically infected with hepatitis C, putting them at risk of serious liver damage if left untreated. Dramatic improvements in what is now a very unpleasant drug regimen are expected over the next several years. Should they wait? Before deciding that this story doesn't apply to you, note that chronic hepatitis C can lie dormant for decades with no symptoms. Most people who have it are unaware of the infection. So the first step is to get a blood test, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last month proposed recommending for everyone born from 1945 to 1965.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Secreto has no idea where he picked up hepatitis C. Tattoos made with India ink and needles passed among 12-year-old friends in South Philly? Hard drugs as a teenager? Blood from dialysis patients when he drove paratransit vehicles in the 1990s? The infection was a surprise, discovered after Secreto's wife heard about hepatitis and suggested he get tested a decade ago. Back then, the treatment didn't work for him. Now, midway through a new drug regimen, the virus is down to undetectable levels.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Deaths from liver-destroying hepatitis C are on the rise, and new data show that baby boomers are most at risk. Federal health officials are considering whether anyone born between 1945 and 1965 should get a one-time blood test to check if their livers harbor this ticking time bomb. Two-thirds of people with hepatitis C are in this age group, most unaware they have a festering virus that takes a few decades to do its damage. The issue has taken new urgency since two drugs hit the market last summer that promise to cure many more people than ever was possible.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Francis "Frank" A. Zampiello, 75, of Philadelphia, an early advocate for better health care through his work with the U.S. Public Health Service, died Thursday, Dec. 1, at home of complications from autoimmune liver disease. Before retiring, Dr. Zampiello was national director of the Quality Center in the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Primary Health Care, where he served from 1997 until 2002. In that role, he worked to reduce errors and increase efficiency in the nation's health-care delivery.
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