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Liver Failure

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NEWS
June 4, 1994 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kaitlyn Schmidt, a rosy-cheeked, blue-eyed 15-month-old with a broad smile, is about to go home after spending more time in the hospital than most people do in a lifetime. But her path to that happy homecoming, scheduled for Monday, has included not only two liver transplants but a mystifying bout with medical bureaucracy that prolonged her hospital stay by three weeks. Other than about eight weeks scattered throughout last fall and winter, the baby has spent nearly all of her life in St. Christopher's Hospital for Children.
NEWS
October 25, 2011
Reginald Curry, 59, of Olney, a Philadelphia jazz musician, died of liver failure Tuesday, Oct. 18, at Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Curry graduated from Bishop Neumann High School. A friend, Carvel Watson, said that after studying in a Model Cities Arts Program in Philadelphia in the 1970s, Mr. Curry became a bassist with Wiusie Metribu, a Philadelphia quintet. Mr. Curry played and recorded with vibraphonist Khan Jamal and drummer Sonny Murray in the 1980s, Watson said.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES - Jeff Hanneman, a founding member of Slayer whose career was irrevocably changed after a spider bite, has died. He was 49. Slayer spokeswoman Heidi Robinson-Fitzgerald said Hanneman died yesterday morning of liver failure at a Los Angeles hospital with his wife, Kathy, by his side. The guitarist had recently begun writing songs with the band in anticipation of recording a new album later this year. He had been recovering from what was believed to be a spider bite that nearly cost him his arm after he failed to seek immediate treatment.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A GUT ISSUE If you think Congress is hard to stomach, imagine how the people who have to work there feel. According to a new survey, heartburn strikes congressional staffers at nearly twice the rate of the general public. Ninety percent of Capitol Hill staffers say working for members of Congress is either somewhat or very stressful, and 59 percent indicate their jobs bring on their indigestion, according to the survey by the Glaxo Institute for Digestive Health. AIDS COMPLICATION New research indicates the AIDS virus increases the likelihood of liver failure and hastens its development among hepatitis C patients.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last three weeks, the Food and Drug Administration has approved two new drugs that are expected to dramatically improve treatment of chronic hepatitis C, a liver-damaging viral infection that afflicts more than 3.2 million Americans. Sovaldi (sofosbuvir), made by Gilead, and Olysio (simeprevir), made by Janssen Therapeutics, could improve cure rates while reducing serious side effects. Jonathan M. Fenkel, a transplant hepatologist who directs Thomas Jefferson University's Hepatitis C Center, answered questions about the disease and the new drugs.
NEWS
August 6, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kevin P. Myers, 57, one of the firefighters sickened by hepatitis C whose diagnoses five years ago were a wake-up call for Philadelphia's department, died Monday of liver failure at home in North Cape May. Mr. Myers had been living at the Jersey Shore since 2002. Like most city firefighters, Mr. Myers did more than put out fires. He also was an emergency medical technician, a position that put him in contact with others' blood, the chief medium for transmitting the virus. Mr. Myers joined the Philadelphia Fire Department in 1974 and retired in 1997, after he was diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Fifties balladeer Johnnie Ray, 63, known as the "Prince of Wails" for his vocal histrionics on such songs as "Cry," died yesterday of liver failure. Mr. Ray had entered Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on Feb. 16 with liver failure, said hospital spokesman Ron Wise. In the early 1950s, the slender, boyish singer revolutionized popular music with his blend of rhythm and blues, country and gospel. He would jump about as he sang, bend his knees and cup his hand to his left ear, where he had worn a hearing aid since an injury at age 10. As he sang, he contorted his face, tugged at his hair and cried.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Dr. Saurabh Jha, For The Inquirer
John woke up before the alarm went off. He could have sworn he felt a sudden sharp pain below his rib cage. His head hurt from last evening's revelry. Perhaps he should have stopped at the fourth or fifth glass of craft beer. Walking to the train station, he became conscious of his breathing. He quickened his pace. But he felt he was oddly aware of his breaths, imagining his diaphragm rising and falling. What an amazing piece of muscle that never rested. Except now it wanted a break.
NEWS
February 19, 2004
MICHELLE Malkin's recent commentary regarding the safety of hepatitis B vaccines ("Beware of the Vaccine Bullies," Feb. 9) may cause unnecessary concern and fear among parents. Simply put, the hepatitis B vaccine is safe. It provides the best possible protection against hepatitis B infection, which now affects more than two billion people worldwide - including more than a million Americans. Hepatitis B can lead to liver problems, including liver failure or even cancer. Prior to routine immunization, 5,000 people died every year in the United States from causes related to hepatitis B. Forty percent of all people with hepatitis B have no known risk factors prior to being infected.
SPORTS
January 29, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
JERSEY CITY, N.J. - You're getting interviewed at the Super Bowl, people expect sweetness and light. It's a given that you're the luckiest guy in the world, so fortunate to be playing for the best gosh-darned organization in sports. Just about every question is about how this or that wonderful aspect of your team has helped bring you to the brink of winning the NFL championship. Sometimes the story is a little more complicated. Michael Robinson, the Seattle Seahawks fullback who led Penn State to the 2005 Big Ten title as a quarterback, definitely feels lucky to be here.
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SPORTS
January 29, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
JERSEY CITY, N.J. - You're getting interviewed at the Super Bowl, people expect sweetness and light. It's a given that you're the luckiest guy in the world, so fortunate to be playing for the best gosh-darned organization in sports. Just about every question is about how this or that wonderful aspect of your team has helped bring you to the brink of winning the NFL championship. Sometimes the story is a little more complicated. Michael Robinson, the Seattle Seahawks fullback who led Penn State to the 2005 Big Ten title as a quarterback, definitely feels lucky to be here.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Dr. Saurabh Jha, For The Inquirer
John woke up before the alarm went off. He could have sworn he felt a sudden sharp pain below his rib cage. His head hurt from last evening's revelry. Perhaps he should have stopped at the fourth or fifth glass of craft beer. Walking to the train station, he became conscious of his breathing. He quickened his pace. But he felt he was oddly aware of his breaths, imagining his diaphragm rising and falling. What an amazing piece of muscle that never rested. Except now it wanted a break.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the last three weeks, the Food and Drug Administration has approved two new drugs that are expected to dramatically improve treatment of chronic hepatitis C, a liver-damaging viral infection that afflicts more than 3.2 million Americans. Sovaldi (sofosbuvir), made by Gilead, and Olysio (simeprevir), made by Janssen Therapeutics, could improve cure rates while reducing serious side effects. Jonathan M. Fenkel, a transplant hepatologist who directs Thomas Jefferson University's Hepatitis C Center, answered questions about the disease and the new drugs.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES - Jeff Hanneman, a founding member of Slayer whose career was irrevocably changed after a spider bite, has died. He was 49. Slayer spokeswoman Heidi Robinson-Fitzgerald said Hanneman died yesterday morning of liver failure at a Los Angeles hospital with his wife, Kathy, by his side. The guitarist had recently begun writing songs with the band in anticipation of recording a new album later this year. He had been recovering from what was believed to be a spider bite that nearly cost him his arm after he failed to seek immediate treatment.
NEWS
October 25, 2011
Reginald Curry, 59, of Olney, a Philadelphia jazz musician, died of liver failure Tuesday, Oct. 18, at Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Curry graduated from Bishop Neumann High School. A friend, Carvel Watson, said that after studying in a Model Cities Arts Program in Philadelphia in the 1970s, Mr. Curry became a bassist with Wiusie Metribu, a Philadelphia quintet. Mr. Curry played and recorded with vibraphonist Khan Jamal and drummer Sonny Murray in the 1980s, Watson said.
NEWS
August 6, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kevin P. Myers, 57, one of the firefighters sickened by hepatitis C whose diagnoses five years ago were a wake-up call for Philadelphia's department, died Monday of liver failure at home in North Cape May. Mr. Myers had been living at the Jersey Shore since 2002. Like most city firefighters, Mr. Myers did more than put out fires. He also was an emergency medical technician, a position that put him in contact with others' blood, the chief medium for transmitting the virus. Mr. Myers joined the Philadelphia Fire Department in 1974 and retired in 1997, after he was diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver.
NEWS
February 19, 2004
MICHELLE Malkin's recent commentary regarding the safety of hepatitis B vaccines ("Beware of the Vaccine Bullies," Feb. 9) may cause unnecessary concern and fear among parents. Simply put, the hepatitis B vaccine is safe. It provides the best possible protection against hepatitis B infection, which now affects more than two billion people worldwide - including more than a million Americans. Hepatitis B can lead to liver problems, including liver failure or even cancer. Prior to routine immunization, 5,000 people died every year in the United States from causes related to hepatitis B. Forty percent of all people with hepatitis B have no known risk factors prior to being infected.
SPORTS
May 7, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
In 4 years with the Miami Dolphins, David Woodley replaced a future Hall of Famer at quarterback, started in a Super Bowl and lost his job to another future Hall of Famer. Woodley, 44, died of liver and kidney failure Sunday at a hospital in his native Shreveport, La., said his niece, Lucy Woodley. He underwent a liver transplant in 1992. A former star at Louisiana State, Woodley succeeded Bob Griese as a Dolphins rookie in 1980. He started in the 1983 Super Bowl, which Miami lost, 27-17, to Washington.
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | Daily News wire services
Shuttle prober: Melted aluminum found on tiles Molten aluminum was found on Columbia's thermal tiles and inside the leading edge of the left wing, bolstering the theory that the space shuttle was destroyed by hot gases that penetrated a damaged spot on the wing, the accident investigation board said yesterday. Roger Tetrault, a board member, said he suspects the melting of the spaceship's aluminum framework occurred because of the piercing gases and also because of the intense heat of falling through the atmosphere.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | By Mark Fazlollah and Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Joe Jude was terrified as he stood before a judge in a Camden courtroom on Jan. 11, 2000. It wasn't prison time that scared the antiques burglar, but the thought of being locked away without his medicine for a potentially fatal liver disease - hepatitis C. If he could take the medicine for three more months, he had a good chance of virtually wiping out the virus. "I begged the judge to please postpone sentencing so that I could continue my interferon therapy to save my life," said Jude, now 41. Superior Court Judge Stephen Thompson gave Jude seven years, but was swayed by his plea for care.
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