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Liver Transplant

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NEWS
June 5, 2003
When Northeast Philadelphia resident Louis G. Ditto received a liver transplant at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in December 2001, he came away grateful and in awe of the medical team that saved his life. "There's nothing I would not do for Jefferson as a whole and the nursing staff in particular," said Ditto, 52, an office worker who also received a kidney. "Those people are wonderful. " Given success stories like that, Jefferson's pioneering program stands firmly alongside the four other adult liver-transplant programs in the Philadelphia region: Each year, they give scores of patients with failing organs a new lease on life.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Casey's chief of staff, James W. Brown, has been through the routine before. The physician consultations, the medical examinations, the operation. So after yesterday's announcement that Casey would undergo tests this weekend to determine his fitness for a liver transplant, Brown was mindful of events six years ago when the governor needed bypass surgery. "I guess my mood is cautiously optimistic," said Brown, settling with a subdued expression into a high-backed, well-worn, brown leather chair in the governor's reception room.
SPORTS
April 3, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Broadcaster Pat Summerall was hospitalized in stable condition yesterday awaiting a donor organ for a liver transplant. The 73-year-old former NFL kicker is on the waiting list at St. Luke's Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., spokesman Erik Kaldor said. He could not say how long it would take before Summerall received a transplant. The veteran broadcaster was flown by air ambulance to Jacksonville from Fort Worth, Texas, where he had been hospitalized in Methodist Medical Center's intensive-care unit since early this week.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
John Keppler is glad to be home. "Ninety-two days (in the hospital) is a long time, too long," he said. Keppler, 33, of Sharon Hill, returned to his Ridley Avenue home last week about three months after he was hospitalized on Feb. 26 for a liver transplant operation at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. "I'm tired, really tired, but it feels good to be home," he said. Keppler underwent a 13-hour liver transplant operation on Feb. 27. He had been waiting for a donor for about three weeks after doctors determined that he was in the final stages of liver disease and could not be "sufficiently managed by medical therapy or other surgical procedures," hospital spokesman Steve Brown said.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN and BOB WARNER, Daily News Staff Writers
The city doesn't know yet exactly where it will get $130,000 to pay for firefighter Tyrone Appling's liver transplant, but City Finance Director Carlo R. Gambetta said yesterday he hoped to "squeeze out" the money from a $135 million fund used for city employees' health and welfare benefits. Both Gambetta and Mayor Goode said the decision to pay for the operation was done as a unique, humanitarian gesture and that they did not believe it would set a precedent for other ill city workers to seek city aid. Appling, meanwhile, was listed in critical condition this morning at Pittsburgh's Presbyterian-University Hospital.
NEWS
March 3, 1987 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia firefighter Tyrone Appling died last night in a Pittsburgh hospital where he was awaiting a liver transplant which the city, in an unprecedented decision, had agreed to pay for. A hospital spokeswoman said Appling, 33, died of "systemic complications, due to acute hepatitis. " Appling, 33, of West Oak Lane, was airlifted to Presbyterian-University Hospital Feb. 19 after the city officials said the city would pay for the $130,000 transplant. A doctor who had treated Appling for hepatitis at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Northern Division, before the fireman went to Pittsburgh said then that Appling was "gravely ill. His only chance is for a transplant operation.
SPORTS
June 7, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Hall of Famer Mickey Mantle has developed progressive liver failure and might need a liver transplant. Mantle, 63, was admitted May 28 to Baylor University Medical Center. Hospital spokeswoman Denise Kile Walton said he was in stable condition. Roy True, a Dallas attorney and longtime friend of the former New York Yankees centerfielder, said in a statement that doctors have characterized Mantle's condition as progressive liver failure due to infection. True quoted Drs. Daniel DeMarco and Kent Hamilton, specialists in gastroenterology, as saying Mantle might require a liver transplant.
SPORTS
July 11, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Morgan Wootten, the acclaimed high school basketball coach who has sent a dozen players to the NBA, had a life-saving liver transplant in Baltimore yesterday, and his doctors said he might be able to coach next season. The 5 1/2-hour operation on the DeMatha High School coach went as planned, said James Burdick, director of the kidney transplant program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Wootten was listed in critical condition in the surgical intensive care unit. Burdick said the prognosis was good and Wootten could be released next week.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The days and weeks of waiting for baby Vanessa Lopez Andino and her mother, Belinda, may soon be over. One-year-old Vanessa, who needs a liver transplant, is first on the list to receive a liver from St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. Meanwhile, the fund drive to raise the $150,000 needed to save the baby's life is continuing. A benefit concert to help the baby, who was brought to the United States by her mother last summer, will be held at the 23 East Caberet on Lancaster Avenue in Ardmore at 8 p.m. Thursday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 2014
A story Sunday incorrectly described veterans' financial responsibility when seeking evaluation for a liver transplant at a VA transplant center. The VA covers the costs of travel to the center. An obituary Monday for the actress Kate O'Mara incorrectly described her role on the TV show Absolutely Fabulous . She was a recurring character but was not one of the billed stars. A "Suburbs&State" brief Friday incorrectly described the late historian Howard Zinn. He was white.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
COATESVILLE Rick Ortega doesn't hide the fact that he's made some mistakes in his 63 years. He abused alcohol, and in May, 25 years after going to rehab, he received his liver-cancer diagnosis. He's always known he had to deal with the consequences of his choices and didn't make excuses, a lesson he passed on to his two children, his son Matt said. "That's how he led his life," Matt Ortega, 39, said, "and I respect him for that. " The lessons he learned from his father, he said, made the choice to donate part of his liver to him easy.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
COATESVILLE Matt Ortega spent the last few months worrying, but the next football game wasn't what kept the Coatesville head football coach up at night. He found out this summer that his father, Rick, needed a liver transplant. "He spent many sleepless nights thinking he may not be a match," said Corrie Ortega. "My husband was very adamant he wanted to be the one to do it. He's very, very close to his dad. " After months of trips to the hospital and many blood tests, screenings, consultations, and a biopsy, Matt Ortega, 39, found out in November that he was a match.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pegram A. Johnson, 62, of Wayne, a biochemist and life-sciences product manager, died Monday, Nov. 25, of liver failure at her home. Dr. Johnson worked for FMC Corp.'s BioProducts divisions in Philadelphia and Rockland, Maine, for 12 years ending in 1999. She managed product and sales development for specialty gelling polymer products that are made using a substance in seaweed. She was most recently employed as a senior product manager for Cambrex Bio Science of Walkersville, Md., specializing in commercial and business development of gelling polymers.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheryl Grover Mack, 61, of Delran, a computer systems analyst for the former Moorestown packaging and distribution center of Tyco Toys Inc., died of kidney failure Friday, Oct. 25, at her home. Mrs. Mack received a liver transplant "about 13 years ago," her husband, Barry, said. "She lived longer than most transplants, but it started giving out. " Born in Riverside, Mrs. Mack graduated from Riverside High School in 1969 and from the IBM Educational Center in Center City in 1975, he said.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
As he reached the end of a grueling 20-hour drive that took him halfway across the country, Bob was dreaming of what he would do when he reached home. He wanted to stretch his legs, visit his elderly mom, buy himself a dozen fresh crabs, steam them, and sit down to watch the Eagles. Not necessarily in that order. For years, Bob had been what doctors might categorize as a train wreck. A recovering alcoholic, he had been used to consuming a liter of vodka every few days. He smoked heavily too, and by the time he had reached his 40s, his body showed signs of all that hard living.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newest patient for a former Philadelphia surgeon is the City of Rome. Last week, Ignazio Marino won 64 percent of the votes in the Italian capital's mayoral race. He resectioned Rome's ties to incumbent Mayor Gianni Alemanno, promising to suture the Eternal City with a more transparent government. Marino, 58, worked extensively in Philadelphia before his foray into politics. From 2002 to 2006, he did nearly 200 organ transplants at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. In his last year, he headed the transplant division.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
After winning a biggest-loser contest at her church, Myra Garcia of Trenton was dismayed when her stomach started growing for no reason this year. A "prophetess" who visited the church urged Garcia, who felt just fine, to seek help. The next week, she started feeling tired and nauseated, and went to a doctor. A series of medical tests came up with an unusual explanation: a type of "benign" tumor that rarely grows beyond a couple inches wide had engulfed the right side of her liver.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
LONDON - For the first time, doctors have successfully transplanted a vein grown with a patient's own stem cells, another example of scientists producing human body parts in the lab. In this case, the patient was a 10-year-old girl in Sweden who was suffering from a severe vein blockage to her liver. In March 2011, the girl's doctors decided to make her a new blood vessel to bypass the blocked vein instead of using one of her own or considering a liver transplant. They took a 31/2-inch section of vein from a deceased donor, which was stripped of all its cells, leaving just a hollow tube.
SPORTS
December 1, 2010 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com kramm@phillynews.com
Timeline for transplants SUNDAY, Nov. 22 11:30 p.m. After discussion with family, Sonia signs the consent form for Paco to be an organ donor and directs kidney to Paco's uncle, Ramon Tejeda, if compatible. Midnight Information relayed to the Chicago organ donor program, Gift of Hope, regarding directed kidney donation to Paco's uncle. MONDAY, Nov. 23 1 a.m. Medical testing to determine organ suitability begins at Hahnemann University Hospital. 4 a.m. Donor blood sent to Chicago for kidney compatibility testing for Paco's uncle.
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