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NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration last week announced a plan to phase out the use of antibiotics to promote weight gain in livestock - a widespread practice thought to have contributed to the spread of drug-resistant bacteria. The agency is asking antibiotics manufacturers to indicate on their labels that the drugs are intended only for the treatment or prevention of disease. Traditionally, such drugs have been administered to also make animals grow faster and improve "feed efficiency," meaning they need less food to gain the same amount of weight.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
GRANTS PASS, Ore. - As long as wolves have been making their comeback, biologists and ranchers have had a decidedly Old West option for dealing with those that develop a taste for beef: Shoot to kill. But for the last year, Oregon has been a "wolf-safe" zone, with ranchers turning to more modern, nonlethal ways to protect livestock. While the number of wolves roaming the state has gone up, livestock kills have not - and now conservation groups are hoping Oregon can serve as a model for other Western states working to return the predator to the wild.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Standing inside the livestock pavilion at the California State Fair, where cattle lowed and city folks stared, James Vietheer held his breath as he spritzed rose-scented oil onto his prize Black Angus bull. Chumlee, a show-ring prima donna who tips the scales at a buff 2,400 pounds, needed to be pretty for the livestock show judges. The animal's hooves had been polished to a shine, but his hairy ankles looked kind of fat. Vietheer reached for a comb and plugged in a commercial hair dryer to restyle the hair to make the ankles look slimmer.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
It has been more than 80 years since foot-and-mouth disease was last seen in this region, but the current outbreak rapidly spreading across Europe has concerned Pennsylvania and New Jersey livestock farmers and prompted state officials to urge extra vigilance to protect area herds. Game officials in both states said yesterday that they have been alerted that deer could contract the highly contagious illness and spread it from their dense population to livestock. The viral disease affecting cattle, swine, sheep, goats and deer and some other animals was eradicated from the United States in 1929, but the global movement of people and goods is causing some authorities to predict that it is not a question of whether foot-and-mouth disease will arrive here, but when.
NEWS
March 28, 1996 | By Alexander Cockburn
There's a sour irony to the fact that it's taken the extremely rare mad cow disease, which has thus far killed a very small number of people in the United Kingdom, to raise the alarm about the consequences of intensive meat and milk production. After all, over the past 150 years, such production has destroyed much of the world's ecological balance and impoverished or otherwise ruined the lives of millions. The U.S. government, of course, maintains that no cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, as mad cow disease is formally known, have been discovered in the United States.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / THERESA McGETTIGAN
The Goshen Country Fair took place last week, with proceeds going to the Goshen Fire Company. Fairgoers enjoyed the Jimmy Ray & Patti Comedy Magic show, several bands, pie-eating contests, tug of wars and livestock shows. There also was the judging of such things as livestock, baked goods, vegetables, flower arrangements, candy, and jams and jellies. Competitors were from Chester and Delaware Counties.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
The cat - make that pig - is out of the bag: Pigs are gaining favor as pals around the house. Specifically, the Vietnamese miniature potbellied variety, which has a growing camp of devotees in Bucks County. They are neat and easily trained, their owners say, and they don't smell, bite or bark. And their adult size won't require the addition of a room - the adult carries about one-tenth of the bulk of the common livestock variety. Their demands are minimal: "It is their greatest pleasure to eat," says Susan Armstrong of Rushland.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During Pennsylvania's earliest days, the area that is now Salford, Montgomery County, was known as the bread basket of the colony because of its production of grain. But while grain crops thrived, animal husbandry was neglected. As a result, farm animals fared poorly far into the 19th century. Except for turkeys, there were no native farm animals in Penn's Woods. What was to become the foundation of American livestock was shipped by boat from Europe. Dutch and Swedish settlers brought over horses, cows, oxen, sheep, hogs, geese and ducks in the 17th century, just before William Penn founded the colony.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a Lancaster County farm yesterday, Pennsylvania agriculture officials approved the first manure-management plan under new state rules that are among the most stringent in the United States. The estimated 2,500 farms in the state with large concentrations of livestock or poultry now must demonstrate that their manure is being properly applied on-site or disposed of safely elsewhere. The rules are intended to minimize manure runoff into streams and to limit the amount of animal waste spread on the ground to prevent pollution of groundwater or adjacent property.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Maple syrup, pulled pork, cotton candy. Honey ice cream, potato doughnuts, rib-eye sandwiches. And, of course, the famous milk shakes. "This," said Breanna Anderson, pointing with her fork to her surroundings. "The food court. " That's what it's about at the Pennsylvania Farm Show, where thousands turn out each year for livestock competitions, shopping, and, of course, the eats. On Saturday, young kids, reminiscing parents, and giddy teens filled the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center in Harrisburg for opening day of the show.
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NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Maple syrup, pulled pork, cotton candy. Honey ice cream, potato doughnuts, rib-eye sandwiches. And, of course, the famous milk shakes. "This," said Breanna Anderson, pointing with her fork to her surroundings. "The food court. " That's what it's about at the Pennsylvania Farm Show, where thousands turn out each year for livestock competitions, shopping, and, of course, the eats. On Saturday, young kids, reminiscing parents, and giddy teens filled the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center in Harrisburg for opening day of the show.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
'OK," a woman's voice called out Wednesday from the white loudspeakers above the bleachers. "All our teams will be coming into the pull now at 4,000 pounds. " Afternoon was turning to evening in Springfield Township as a crowd of 300 gazed on a majestic team of golden horses being walked to a massive sled, weighted with concrete blocks, at the center of a narrow, muddy field. Now approaching, said the announcer, were Bruce and Todd, two Belgian geldings with a combined weight of 3,290 pounds, owned by Tom Bowman of Orangeville, Pa. In a moment, the two were hitched to the sled, their owner let out a "haaa!
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration last week announced a plan to phase out the use of antibiotics to promote weight gain in livestock - a widespread practice thought to have contributed to the spread of drug-resistant bacteria. The agency is asking antibiotics manufacturers to indicate on their labels that the drugs are intended only for the treatment or prevention of disease. Traditionally, such drugs have been administered to also make animals grow faster and improve "feed efficiency," meaning they need less food to gain the same amount of weight.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spectators who went to the Middletown Grange Fair in Wrightstown, Bucks County, last week got a healthy dose of a classic American summer festival - apple pie contests, livestock shows, carnival rides, and funnel cake. But some of the most popular attractions were newcomers, including the "Dancing Diggers," a group of heavy-machinery operators who choreographed a dance to rock music. Observers called it "backhoe ballet. " For Doug Taylor, who led the crew, it was an opportunity to demonstrate the power and dexterity of the machines he sells at the family store, Earthborne Equipment in Warrington.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
GRANTS PASS, Ore. - As long as wolves have been making their comeback, biologists and ranchers have had a decidedly Old West option for dealing with those that develop a taste for beef: Shoot to kill. But for the last year, Oregon has been a "wolf-safe" zone, with ranchers turning to more modern, nonlethal ways to protect livestock. While the number of wolves roaming the state has gone up, livestock kills have not - and now conservation groups are hoping Oregon can serve as a model for other Western states working to return the predator to the wild.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a Chester County man shot and killed his neighbors' Bernese mountain dogs, which he said were threatening his sheep, the uproar led to criminal charges against the farmer. And the case also could lead to changes in state law. State Sen. Andrew Dinniman (D., Chester) plans to introduce bills that would fine-tune legal language to address the question of when deadly force against domestic pets is justified. Dinniman said one of the bills, which would be introduced before the end of next week, was directly inspired by the Chester Springs shootings, in which FedEx driver and sheep farmer Gabriel Pilotti shot and killed dogs belonging to his neighbors Mary and William Bock.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Jim Abrams, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House on Thursday voted to extend disaster assistance to livestock producers reeling from rising feed prices caused by the drought that has scorched much of the nation. The 223-197 vote to revive expired disaster-relief programs for cattle and sheep producers was one of the House's last actions before lawmakers left for their five-week August recess. The Senate was not acting on the bill as it wrapped up its pre-recess work, and Democratic opponents characterized the legislation as cover for Republicans having to explain to rural constituents why they put off action on a comprehensive five-year farm policy bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there! In 2008, Larry, a third-generation Delaware farmer, was visiting his friend, Dave, at the farmhouse he was renting in Chester County. The door opened, and in walked Dave's housemate, Kathleen. "That vision of her was burned into my head," Larry said. Larry was taken. But Kathleen, who grew up in Lansdale, was far too exhausted from a day of teaching sixth-grade English and science at the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District and graduate classes at Gwynedd-Mercy to pay much attention to any man, she said, even a "good-looking fellow" like Larry.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Tom Odula, Associated Press
ILKEEK-LEMEDUNG'I, Kenya - Crouching at dawn in the savannah's tall grass, the lions tore through the flesh of eight goats. Dogs barked, women screamed, and men with the rank of warrior in this village of Maasai tribesman gathered their spears. Kenya Wildlife Service rangers responded to the attack, but arrived without a veterinarian and no way to tranquilize the eight lions and remove them from Ilkeek-Lemedung'I, a settlement of mud and stone homes not far from the edges of Nairobi National Park.
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