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Lizard

NEWS
April 6, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's the bare-bones plot of Tri-Star Pictures' $100 million sci-fi blockbuster "Godzilla," scheduled for release May 20: A huge lizard with big spiked plates down his back - a dead ringer for a dinosaur - shows up in the middle of New York City. It's up to Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno and Hank Azaria, among others, to stop the creature before it whomps and stomps Manhattan - as well as the rest of the world - into dust. Does this sound familiar? Of course. After all, there have been 22 previous movies about Godzilla.
NEWS
November 30, 1997 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paul Winke still remembers the thrill he witnessed in the eyes of his science students more than 30 years ago when "Herbie" the lizard landed safely, strapped to a parachute, after he was launched in a model rocket from behind Walnut Street School. Before risking the pet's life, the students in Winke's model rocket club had launched eggs, padded with cotton and assorted cushions, during trial runs. "The eggs came back down in perfect condition," said Winke, 61, unable to hide his amusement at the memory.
NEWS
December 14, 1995 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services, the New York Daily News, USA Today and Wahington Post contributed to this report
Yeah, he showed up on Barbara Walters, and has made one or two amazing appearances at New York events, but Christopher Reeve wasn't able to go home - until yesterday. Almost seven months after the riding accident that left him paralyzed from the shoulders down, the actor left the North Jersey facility where he's been in rehab for his home in upstate New York. "As I leave Kessler Institute, I experience many profound feelings," Reeve said in a statement issued yesterday. "Most of all, happiness to be going home with my wife and children.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're ugly. They bite. They can be infectious. And they're wildly popular. Green iguanas. "The number of reptiles imported into the United States has increased dramatically . . . and primarily reflects importation of iguanas (27,806 in 1986 to 798,405 in 1993)," states a May 5 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One of those lizards belongs to Rene Massey. Massey runs a dog-grooming business in South Ardmore. She usually has to keep her iguana at home in Kensington.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
You recognize him immediately in the crowd: the tall, well-dressed gentleman with a Nat Sherman cigarette delicately dangling from one hand and a frosted-over martini glass of Kettel One vodka cupped in the other. The silver hair greased back. The faint smell of aftershave. The tanned face, bobbing like a boxer to buss the cheeks of fading beauties in tight dresses and the gray-suited, middle-aged lizard men who lust after them - and know him: The Last Playboy. On this night in the Palm Restaurant Bar, Harry Jay Katz, wooer of women, sultan of schmooze, King of Late Night and Early Morning, looks like he hasn't lost a step since one of his dates happened to drown in his hot tub two months ago. "Harry !
NEWS
January 27, 1995 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brain researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have uncovered strong evidence of what everybody already knew. In some important respects, men and women don't think alike. They literally use their brains differently. A study of brain use patterns in 61 Philadelphia-area subjects reported in the current issue of Science found a biological basis for long-noted behavioral differences between the sexes - differences such as that, for instance, men are far more prone to violence than women, or that women tend to have a harder time with math.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Ever hear the one about Flute the horny horn frog, who every morning at 2 o'clock during mating season would make this whistling sound ("like a kid's sliding flute") hoping to attract a honey? Or about Igor the irrepressible iguana, who escaped from its cage, knocked out the screen in the kitchen window and went squiggling down the alley in search of a partner? Lisa Bryant has. Knows why they did it, too. It's called nature. "You don't just invite them into your house and expect them to stop this mess," explained Bryant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Colorful, cartoony screens wheel into view and unfold to define the interior of a house. Huge, black-fabric rectangles, outfitted with flapping arms, glide here and there. A quartet of women in outsize masks chants and sings in the manner of a Greek chorus. Before a backdrop on which a handwritten manuscript is overlaid with projections of the Andalusian countryside, silhouetted figures walk silently across the rear of the stage, stooped from the burdens of a world gone mad. And the hero's alter ego - his imagination, his muse, his inner reality - hovers around his corporeal self, offering advice and caution.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
On July 14, 1936, Federico Garcia Lorca, Spain's best-known poet and playwright, arrived in Granada to visit his mother and father for the family's annual celebration of St. Frederick's Day. Just over a month later, in the early morning, in an olive grove on a hill outside the Andalusian city, he was executed by a firing squad. What happened in the period between Lorca's arrival in Granada and his death - which was a tragedy for art, a tragedy for Spain, and a tragic case of Lorca's being in the wrong place at the wrong time - is the subject of Sign of the Lizard, a new play by Louis Lippa opening Friday at People's Light & Theatre Company in Malvern.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louisiana crickets aren't making it to Pennsylvania in time for dinner. The crunchy insects, the diet of choice for pet lizards, are freezing to death en route, say local pet store owners. Last week, for example, not one of the 8,000 crickets survived the low temperatures while being shipped from a Louisiana cricket breeding company to Worldwide Aquarium & Pets in Upper Darby, said manager Tim Flood. "There are a lot of hungry lizards," said Tim McKenna, who owns Pet Paradise in Boothwyn.
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