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Loading Dock

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NEWS
November 9, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Warminster Township Planning Commission has conditionally approved a 15,000-square-foot building in the Warminster Industrial Park. At Wednesday's regular meeting, the commission voted unanimously to approve the plans by Jotosa Construction Co., pending a legal opinion from township solicitor Richard T. Molish. Molish was asked to determine whether a zoning requirement for an off-street loading dock is applicable in this case. According to the township zoning code, an off-street loading dock is required for all industrial buildings larger than 6,000 square feet.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The Conshohocken Borough Council approved the addition of a loading dock at an East Elm Street business and heard a report on the progress of a borough cleanup campaign Wednesday. The seven-member council voted unanimously to approve a request from the Plymouth Pump Co. to build the loading dock and storage area, at 445 E. Elm St., next to the sewer plant. The property owner, Edward Weil, explained that the loading dock was necessary because he lost access to his property when construction of the new sewer plant began.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Jotosa Construction Co. can proceed with plans for a new building in the Warminster Industrial Park. At Wednesday night's meeting of the Warminster Township Planning Commission, chairman William Bauer announced that a favorable interpretation of the township's loading-dock requirement will permit Jotosa president Tom Yurkovic to construct a 15,000-square-foot building. Yurkovic first presented his plans to the township Oct. 15. They were rejected at that time because of an ordinance that requires all buildings over 6,000 square feet to have an off-street loading dock.
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art on Tuesday pulled off what had to be a first for the city: More than a hundred of Philadelphia's wealthiest, most culturally connected citizens gathered at the museum to celebrate the ground-breaking for a loading dock. Never have so many come to marvel at the site of future truck bays. Trumpets rang out. Smoked salmon-bearing waiters wove in and out of the crowd. At its center was impish, 81-year-old architect Frank Gehry, all in black, shock of white hair riffling in the breeze, confiding with a smile, "I'm just a little guy. " To be fair, all the hoopla was not simply for what the museum officially terms its new Art Handling Facility, about 68,000 square feet of new backstage space.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Abraham Lincoln strikes a swashbuckling pose belying his humble surroundings. This has to be a first, one of the greatest presidents in history chilling on a loading dock. Lincoln looks beefier than I've ever seen him. He clasps a telescope in his left hand and casts a determined gaze, like a sailor searching for land. To the right of the nation's 16th leader rest two mattresses and rolls of bubble wrap. To his left, stacks of English and Continental furniture awaiting sale or delivery.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two men were severely burned yesterday in a flash fire that erupted while they were cleaning the basement of an old loading dock in the city's Frankford section. Witnesses reported hearing an explosion and then immediately seeing the fire in the 1600 block of Unity Street, just east of Frankford Avenue, shortly after noon. One of the victims ran out of the building. Neighbors rushed to his aid to put out the flames. Tullis Jackson, 51, of the 6000 block of Nassau Road, suffered third-degree burns over 35 percent of his body, mostly his legs, said Executive Fire Chief Henry Dolberry.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A newborn girl weighing three pounds was found yesterday afternoon on the loading dock of a Chester County Intermediate Unit facility in the 1500 block of Lincoln Highway in Caln Township, police said. Wrapped in a sheet, the baby was found by Intermediate Unit employees at 12:24 p.m., Caln Police Sgt. Brian Byerly said. An employee took the baby inside the Stanley K. Landis building, which houses Head Start and early-intervention programs and where a last-day-of-class celebration was underway.
NEWS
October 6, 2000 | By Brian Woodward, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nearly two months after being found abandoned, swaddled in a bedsheet and clinging to life, a baby girl discovered on the loading dock of a Coatesville school is in a foster home and on her way to adoption. "She was released from the hospital in mid-September," said Jim Forsythe, director of the Chester County Department of Children, Youth and Families, "and she is doing really well. " Forsythe said the girl, who was briefly called Baby Brandy and then temporarily Bobbi Anderson, was in an agency foster home.
REAL_ESTATE
August 15, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
To say the apartments at Fairmount@Brewerytown are going like hotcakes would not be far from wrong. They're going so quickly, Michele DiVeterano said, that she has stopped creating model units. As many as eight to 10 apartments are renting each week. "Once I get a model set up, it is gone in a couple of days," said DiVeterano, vice president of operations for the developer, McSpain Properties. "It is a lot of hard work to create one for such a short time. " Although at the end of July, 35 of the building's 161 studio, one- and two-bedroom units were occupied - all on the fourth, fifth and sixth floors - Fairmount@Brewerytown is still a work in progress, attracting a target audience of millennials.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | G.W. MILLER III/ DAILY NEWS
Guests and employees of the Philadelphia Housing Authority and the Metropolitan AIDS Neighborhood Nutrition Alliance watch the dedication yesterday of a mural painted in a loading dock of the PHA building at 12 S. 23rd Street. The surreal mural was painted by Parris Stancell and Catherine Hughes.
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REAL_ESTATE
August 15, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
To say the apartments at Fairmount@Brewerytown are going like hotcakes would not be far from wrong. They're going so quickly, Michele DiVeterano said, that she has stopped creating model units. As many as eight to 10 apartments are renting each week. "Once I get a model set up, it is gone in a couple of days," said DiVeterano, vice president of operations for the developer, McSpain Properties. "It is a lot of hard work to create one for such a short time. " Although at the end of July, 35 of the building's 161 studio, one- and two-bedroom units were occupied - all on the fourth, fifth and sixth floors - Fairmount@Brewerytown is still a work in progress, attracting a target audience of millennials.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
When Rodney Talbo Shelton II took a Megabus from Hampton, Va., to Philadelphia last June, he was armed with a 9mm handgun, prepared to commit a robbery, and willing, authorities say, to use the gun if necessary. Three days later, at a quiet loading dock in Yeadon at 3:30 a.m., with the same gun in tow, they say, Shelton had the opportunity he needed: an older target, a secluded location. Authorities say Shelton attempted to rob Thomas Childs, 63, a delivery driver from Aston, at the Ridgway Industries loading dock along Baltimore Pike.
NEWS
May 31, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
From the front gate, Revolution Recovery looks like any other dump. Trucks are constantly pulling off I-95 and unloading mini-mountains of junk - about 350 tons a day. But the Northeast Philadelphia recycling center also is an established wellspring of creativity through the nonprofit Recycled Artist in Residency (RAIR), founded in 2010. Now, with the help of a $60,000 grant from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the recycling dump has become a performance venue where RAIR continues to blur the lines between trash and art, and raise awareness about sustainability.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2016
Yards Brewing Co. sells enough beer - 42,000 barrels last year - that it is running out of space at the 40,000-square-foot plant it opened in 2007 on Delaware Avenue, a few blocks north of the Ben Franklin Bridge. The brewery - Yards' third since president Tom Kehoe opened the original tiny plant in Manayunk 22 years ago - is crowded with 22 shining 200-barrel fermenter tanks; cold storage; a loading dock; a research lab; a tasting room/restaurant, which opens at noon daily; and offices, all in the riverside neighborhood near the SugarHouse Casino.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
These days, every truck in JCI Transportation's fleet has a flat-screen television and satellite radio. Company-supplied refrigerators in the cab are becoming the norm, and drivers, if they want, can plug in a microwave. "We try to give them all the comforts of home," said Larry Mertz, operations director at the Pennsauken trucking company. On any given day, Mertz, like nearly every trucking executive in the country, is desperately seeking more drivers - the industry needs 47,500 more of them.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
ADMIRERS OF the historic Boyd Theatre haven't let it go down without a fight, and neighbors aren't letting anything new go up without one either. The fight carries on after the architectural committee of the Historical Commission denied the proposed plan yesterday for the property on Chestnut Street near 19th. Plans are still up in the air until the full commission votes on the project June 12. Current owner Pearl Properties intends to build a residential tower, retail and restaurant spaces, and an underground parking structure while maintaining some of the structure of the 1920s-era theater.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the busiest week of the year for United Parcel Service, the Boscov's loading dock at Neshaminy Mall was a bustling gateway Monday. A 48-foot trailer stuffed with online orders had already been hauled away, and UPS driver Bob Young was back for more. "What I scanned was 2,311 pieces," Young said before loading a 24-foot truck with another big stash. The shipping giant would pick up a projected 34 million packages globally Monday, its most hectic day of the year. But Boscov's Department Stores Inc., the modest family-owned retailer, was showing that you don't need to be big and brawny to muscle into the online market.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
C HRISTOPHER CERA, 35, of Bella Vista, is founder and chief technology officer of Arcweb. The firm, which started in 2011, operates out of the co-working space Indy Hall in Old City. It builds workflow-, logistics- and operations-software products that streamline business processes. Cera, an Upper Darby native, is also a co-founder of Philly Startup Leaders. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Arcweb? A: It happened by accident. I was consulting and did a lot of founder dating and worked with entrepreneurs.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
  A 20-story residential tower planned at the entrance to the popular Schuylkill River Park won final approval Tuesday from the Civic Design Review board, despite concerns that the project could seriously affect pedestrian safety and an adjacent community garden. The unanimous decision cleared the way for developer Carl Dranoff to start construction next fall. Joan Wells, president of the Schuylkill River Park Community Garden, said she was disappointed that the review board gave the project a green light, especially after several board members pointed out problems with the design.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A goose was killed by an amusement-park ride at Six Flags Great Adventure and as spectators watched in horror, according to a published report. The Asbury Park Press says the ill-fated goose landed on the sloped conveyor belt that pulls rafts up to a loading dock of the Congo Rapids ride on Sunday at the Ocean County amusement park. Witness Nicole Cora, 26. of Stonington, Conn., told the newspaper that operators stopped the belt and tried to scare the bird, but it did not budge.
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