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Lobbyist

NEWS
November 19, 1986 | By SUSAN BENNETT, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Bob Warner contributed to this report.)
A lobbyist who was paid $266,000 to represent the City of Philadelphia in Congress the past 16 months will not have his contract renewed and must now compete with other lobbying groups for next year's work, city officials say. David Boonin, head of Mayor Goode's intergovernmental affairs office, said the city is soliciting proposals from a number of lobbyists and lobbying firms, including Anthony L. Jones, who has run the city's office in Washington...
NEWS
June 11, 1997
Last year Congress and President Clinton required welfare recipients to work after two years on the dole, but their brand of reform didn't do enough to help folks with paltry skills and experience. This year's budget deal channels extra money - $3 billion over five years - into hiring people off the welfare rolls. The easy thing to say is that it's not enough. The shocking thing to realize is that it could have been worse. As Republicans pushed for cutting taxes every which way and Mr. Clinton bargained for his own tax cuts cum new spending, there was a real chance that the welfare-to-work funding would be even skimpier.
NEWS
May 10, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
After living lavishly as a political operative and lobbyist, Robert Stears landed a new job - as federal inmate No. 41335-050 - serving food to fellow prisoners for $45 a month. He went to prison after telling a judge in 2008 that he overbilled the Burlington County Bridge Commission in a scheme to kick back contributions to the county Republican Party. Lately he's been getting ready for freedom. His release, scheduled for last weekend, coincides with a changed political climate in New Jersey, where opportunities for shenanigans with the public's money still abound but are under a harsher spotlight.
NEWS
November 19, 2001 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Otilie English is finally getting traction where she once spun her wheels. English, the Washington lobbyist for the Northern Alliance that is fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, has been besieged since Sept. 11 by U.S. officials and media seeking information about the rebel movement. Her Arlington, Va., apartment, the unofficial Washington office of the Northern Alliance, hums as English and aides hurry about, cell phones glued to their ears. It wasn't always so. Before Sept.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
While Michael Nutter wooed the sugar haters in Washington last week, given that he was against soda before Bloomberg blew up on Big Gulps, things were souring back home in a supersized way. The mayor was playing beautifully on the road but getting dismal reviews back home. City Council was unhappy. You do not want City Council unhappy. There were problems with millage, the homestead exemption, Actual Value Initiative (AVI), and the aggregate value of all city property, complicated issues that matter greatly.
REAL_ESTATE
March 18, 1990 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years ago, when City Council was getting ready to approve the nation's highest real estate transfer tax, the city's Realtors put up a fight - but not a very effective one. In fairness, they didn't know what was about to hit them. "No one did," said Nancy Zambelli, spokeswoman for the Philadelphia Board of Realtors. Council approved a 63 percent increase in the transfer tax - from 2.50 percent to 4.07 percent - that added $1,136 to the tax bill of an $80,000 house at settlement.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When the Ciba-Geigy Corp., the Swiss chemical giant, wanted to keep piping millions of gallons of waste-water into the Atlantic Ocean, its executives knew the man to call. When Republican Tom Kean was caught in a public relations nightmare over plans to boost tolls on the Garden State Parkway, his aides knew where to go for help. And when Democratic Gov. Michael S. Dukakis of Massachusetts faced a crucial presidential primary test in New York last year, his campaign knew just the operative to lend a hand.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | By Peter Nicholas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Peter Peyser was a city lobbyist here for 18 years, since Bill Green was mayor. He worked for W. Wilson Goode, Edward G. Rendell, and, until recently, John F. Street. Now Peyser is out - he hears - and he's not sure why. Peyser says he has gotten no word from the Street administration - not a letter, fax or phone call telling him he has been bounced from the city's lobbying team to make room for a new group that the mayor hopes is better wired with the Bush White House. The few clues about his ouster, Peyser says, have come from people outside the Street administration.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2006 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary McManus, Comcast Corp.'s newest Federal Communications Commission lobbyist, will be on familiar territory. Before joining the Philadelphia cable company this month, she worked in the FCC's Office of General Counsel, in a bureau that focuses on competition in the telecommunications industry, according to an announcement from Comcast yesterday. McManus, who has an English degree from Trinity College and a law degree from Georgetown University, has worked on many issues, including auctions of wireless frequencies.
NEWS
July 16, 2008 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A close friend of former U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon has agreed to plead guilty to destroying records soon after the FBI interviewed her about the congressman. Cecelia M. Grimes, 43, a real estate agent who became a highly paid defense lobbyist, is the second person charged in an influence-peddling investigation involving Weldon, who became an influential member of the House Armed Services Committee during his 20 years in Congress. Grimes had no Washington experience, and worked out of her home in Media.
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