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Local Food

NEWS
July 27, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob and Leda Muth started their business in Gloucester County eight years ago, there weren't many farmers like them. They set up a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) enterprise in Williamstown that sold memberships to people interested in getting fresh produce every week. Today, more than 400 members each spend $250 to $639 - depending on their plan - to pick up supplies of vegetables and fruits over 16 weeks. Hundreds of others are on a waiting list to join. Across the region, a growing number of CSA farms, many of them certified organic, are taking root as consumers look for locally grown produce at prices that are often less than those in the supermarkets.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A global giant that dishes out food and drink to Olympics athletes, sports fans and schoolchildren will likely add the Chester County Prison to its client roster. The Chester County Commissioners today are expected to award a $795,101 food service contract for the prison to Aramark, the low bidder for a job that has been done by county employees. County Government Services Director Wayne Rothermel said the county can expect $132,000 in savings next year by contracting out the service, primarily due to the economies of scale a company as large as Aramark can offer.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Farm Aid is coming to the Garden State. The annual all-star fund- raising concert, which was founded in 1985 by Willie Nelson after Bob Dylan made remarks in support of American farmers at Live Aid in Philadelphia that year, will take place at the Tweeter Center in Camden on Sept. 30. The 19th Farm Aid - the concert took three years off in the late '80s and early '90s, but has been an annual event since 1992 - will feature Nelson and his three fellow Farm Aid board members - Neil Young, Dave Matthews and John Mellencamp.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting comfortably in the middle of the cool Hanapepe River, Helen Dotimas scraped her knife over the scales of a fish as her great-grandchildren splashed nearby. Devastated by Hurricane Iniki like everyone else, she was nevertheless planning a good dinner - without government help. "We were supposed to pick up supplies, but I think we have enough," said Dotimas, 67. "Usually, I don't do this, but since the hurricane came . . . ," she shrugged, pointing to a plastic bag full of opi fish that her son had speared.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Think It's a Wonderful Life and Oliver! - with a reptilian twist. Or Saving Green Fruit Loop. That works, too. About a week ago, Sally Mabon, a Princeton mom and policy researcher, was washing some tatsoi, a kind of Asian spinach bought at a local health-food store, only to find an unexpected houseguest - a little lizard nestled in the leaves. Surprised, she called over daughter Faye Steingart, the family's resident kindergartner, to take a peek. Admittedly, the little creature wasn't looking good: brown, shriveled, limp from a couple of days in the family's refrigerator.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
ANYONE well-versed in contemporary commerce will tell you that while credit is convenient, cash is king. Unless you're in South Philadelphia, where an ancient form of currency holds even loftier influence, and goes great with a little cheese. The painstaking art of hand-making soppressata - the heavily spiced, cured pork salami closely associated with southern Italy - is not lost, but it's not exactly easy to find. That's why anyone armed with a bucket of the stuff - "super-sod" past Snyder Avenue, "soupie" in coal-mining country, a thousand colloquial variations everywhere else - might as well be strutting down the street with a wallet fatter than a hog set to slaughter.
NEWS
February 21, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
First of two parts. He was one of the first great chefs of Philadelphia - in fact, of the young nation. The chief cook in President George Washington's home here in 1790 had only one name: Hercules. In the mansion's open-hearth kitchen, where elaborate banquets were prepared, where spitted meats sizzled and "fricaseys" simmered in cast-iron pans over hickory fires, underlings scurried to execute the orders of Hercules, "the great master-spirit," according to one account, who seemed to be everywhere at once.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015 | Drew Lazor, For the Daily News
The cashier, an employee of a certain Swedish purveyor of stylish yet affordable home furnishings, took one look at the items I placed on his conveyor belt - six glass bottles with stopper tops - and perked up. "Nice. You making coquito?" He was dead-on. Right now, as we bear down on Christmas, we're in the thick of peak coquito season, when Puerto Ricans swarm their kitchens to blend up big batches of their island's answer to eggnog. To many, the creamy coconut concoction is just as crucial to the holiday experience as candy canes, glazed ham, and cookies shaped like tiny men. But as much fun as it is to make and drink, it serves a more broad-minded purpose: sharing this specialty is more meaningful than sipping it. In the coquito economy, 'tis better to give than to receive - though receiving is pretty sweet, too. 'Little Coconut' While Anglo nog typically comprises a combination of eggs, milk, sugar, and spices cut by any number of spirits, coquito is built upon two elements vital to boricua life: coconut and rum. Sipped cold in small portions, it's sweet, rich, and warmly spiced like conventional nog, but its lighter, yolk-free consistency and well-balanced tropical bite set it apart.
NEWS
May 6, 2010
Letter carriers will collect nonperishable food Saturday as part of a nationwide initiative to fight hunger. The annual initiative, the largest one-day food drive in the nation, is sponsored by the National Association of Letter Carriers and the U.S. Postal Service. Residents should place food items near their mailboxes before mail delivery Saturday. Letter carriers will deliver the donations to a local food bank or pantry. - Kristin E. Holmes
BUSINESS
November 5, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Manayunk Bridge dominates the view from the outdoor deck behind Gaily's Crazy Cow Cafe. The nearly 100-year-old bridge reopened Friday as a pedestrian and bicycle throughway connecting Lower Merion and Philadelphia. "I'm hoping they'll see me from the bridge and come down here," said Gaily Moore, the owner of the restaurant on Manayunk's Main Street. She is among business owners looking to the bridge to bring new customers. The proximity of Main Street shopping to the bridge has some envisioning Manayunk as the go-to shopping and eating destination for Lower Merion's Bala Cynwyd community.
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