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NEWS
December 31, 2006 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
With the confidence and swagger of an experienced eater, Marc Bruno approaches the counter at Jim's Steaks on South Street and orders Cheez Whiz with. Between bites into the soft roll full of chopped steak and Cheez Whiz - with grilled onions - he deliberates on its innards. "Notice how they put the cheese on first? I think it makes the cheesesteak drier than Pat's Steaks because the cheese is absorbed in the bread. " Bruno, who moved to Wallingford from Manayunk less than a year ago, is no ordinary cheesesteak fan. He is regional vice president for Aramark's business services.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All you need is shampoo - or so you say. You go to Target, ignore the giant red shopping carts at the entrance, and dart to the health and beauty aisle, determined to stay focused. The next thing you know, you're at the checkout juggling a snowman doormat, a Captain America kiddie T-shirt, a box of Cheerios, and a stash of paper towels big enough for a bomb shelter. You are Target's dream customer, and there are a lot of you out there. But now the Minnesota retailer wants you to drop by more often, so it has come up with new bait it's testing across the Philadelphia area before launching it nationwide.
NEWS
July 27, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob and Leda Muth started their business in Gloucester County eight years ago, there weren't many farmers like them. They set up a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) enterprise in Williamstown that sold memberships to people interested in getting fresh produce every week. Today, more than 400 members each spend $250 to $639 - depending on their plan - to pick up supplies of vegetables and fruits over 16 weeks. Hundreds of others are on a waiting list to join. Across the region, a growing number of CSA farms, many of them certified organic, are taking root as consumers look for locally grown produce at prices that are often less than those in the supermarkets.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A global giant that dishes out food and drink to Olympics athletes, sports fans and schoolchildren will likely add the Chester County Prison to its client roster. The Chester County Commissioners today are expected to award a $795,101 food service contract for the prison to Aramark, the low bidder for a job that has been done by county employees. County Government Services Director Wayne Rothermel said the county can expect $132,000 in savings next year by contracting out the service, primarily due to the economies of scale a company as large as Aramark can offer.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Farm Aid is coming to the Garden State. The annual all-star fund- raising concert, which was founded in 1985 by Willie Nelson after Bob Dylan made remarks in support of American farmers at Live Aid in Philadelphia that year, will take place at the Tweeter Center in Camden on Sept. 30. The 19th Farm Aid - the concert took three years off in the late '80s and early '90s, but has been an annual event since 1992 - will feature Nelson and his three fellow Farm Aid board members - Neil Young, Dave Matthews and John Mellencamp.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting comfortably in the middle of the cool Hanapepe River, Helen Dotimas scraped her knife over the scales of a fish as her great-grandchildren splashed nearby. Devastated by Hurricane Iniki like everyone else, she was nevertheless planning a good dinner - without government help. "We were supposed to pick up supplies, but I think we have enough," said Dotimas, 67. "Usually, I don't do this, but since the hurricane came . . . ," she shrugged, pointing to a plastic bag full of opi fish that her son had speared.
FOOD
May 5, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
When Emma Cunniff, 25, started her own farm three years ago, she got a crucial infusion of capital by creating a community-supported agriculture program, or CSA. It let backers pay up front for shares of produce through spring, summer, and fall - and supplied Cunniff with money to buy seeds and tractors, and to eventually expand her Kneehigh Farm in Pottstown from two acres to seven. That's how it's worked ever since the CSA movement began 30 years ago. Now, though, small farmers like Cunniff are finding themselves in competition with a slew of subscription-based food vendors, from meal-kit boxes like Blue Apron to mail-order produce boxes like Farmbox Direct to aggregators who mix local produce with stuff from Florida or Mexico.
NEWS
May 6, 2010
Letter carriers will collect nonperishable food Saturday as part of a nationwide initiative to fight hunger. The annual initiative, the largest one-day food drive in the nation, is sponsored by the National Association of Letter Carriers and the U.S. Postal Service. Residents should place food items near their mailboxes before mail delivery Saturday. Letter carriers will deliver the donations to a local food bank or pantry. - Kristin E. Holmes
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
There are nearly 5,000 school gardens across the United States, living lessons that sprout on rooftops and lawns, in greenhouses and classrooms. Of the 133 in Pennsylvania, one of the more fruitful flourishes in a former courtyard at Bucks County's Bristol Middle-High School, where 4,000 plants occupy 30,000 neatly-tended square feet. A small farm, really. In four years, the garden has grown to 21 raised beds, with an herb wall, a pond graced by a waterfall, a cistern, arbors, tree-shaded picnic benches, and a new vermiculture system in which worms turn food waste into nutrient-rich compost.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
A lot of people seem to think the lies and insults unleashed in the current presidential race are unprecedented - one headline the other day declared, "Worst. Campaign. Ever. " - and that, by sinking so low, we have sullied the high-minded democracy envisioned by the Founding Fathers. But here's some perspective: The Founding Fathers actually wrote the book on how to brawl in the streets. In the words of historian Edward Larson, "They could write like angels and scheme like demons.
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