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BUSINESS
October 11, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All you need is shampoo - or so you say. You go to Target, ignore the giant red shopping carts at the entrance, and dart to the health and beauty aisle, determined to stay focused. The next thing you know, you're at the checkout juggling a snowman doormat, a Captain America kiddie T-shirt, a box of Cheerios, and a stash of paper towels big enough for a bomb shelter. You are Target's dream customer, and there are a lot of you out there. But now the Minnesota retailer wants you to drop by more often, so it has come up with new bait it's testing across the Philadelphia area before launching it nationwide.
NEWS
July 27, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob and Leda Muth started their business in Gloucester County eight years ago, there weren't many farmers like them. They set up a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) enterprise in Williamstown that sold memberships to people interested in getting fresh produce every week. Today, more than 400 members each spend $250 to $639 - depending on their plan - to pick up supplies of vegetables and fruits over 16 weeks. Hundreds of others are on a waiting list to join. Across the region, a growing number of CSA farms, many of them certified organic, are taking root as consumers look for locally grown produce at prices that are often less than those in the supermarkets.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A global giant that dishes out food and drink to Olympics athletes, sports fans and schoolchildren will likely add the Chester County Prison to its client roster. The Chester County Commissioners today are expected to award a $795,101 food service contract for the prison to Aramark, the low bidder for a job that has been done by county employees. County Government Services Director Wayne Rothermel said the county can expect $132,000 in savings next year by contracting out the service, primarily due to the economies of scale a company as large as Aramark can offer.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Farm Aid is coming to the Garden State. The annual all-star fund- raising concert, which was founded in 1985 by Willie Nelson after Bob Dylan made remarks in support of American farmers at Live Aid in Philadelphia that year, will take place at the Tweeter Center in Camden on Sept. 30. The 19th Farm Aid - the concert took three years off in the late '80s and early '90s, but has been an annual event since 1992 - will feature Nelson and his three fellow Farm Aid board members - Neil Young, Dave Matthews and John Mellencamp.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting comfortably in the middle of the cool Hanapepe River, Helen Dotimas scraped her knife over the scales of a fish as her great-grandchildren splashed nearby. Devastated by Hurricane Iniki like everyone else, she was nevertheless planning a good dinner - without government help. "We were supposed to pick up supplies, but I think we have enough," said Dotimas, 67. "Usually, I don't do this, but since the hurricane came . . . ," she shrugged, pointing to a plastic bag full of opi fish that her son had speared.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
THE SOUTH Jersey suburb where David Miscavige grew up was utopian by design, a prefab paradise where footballs and fireflies floated over lush, green lawns and parents played pinochle long after the ice cubes melted in their cocktails. Miscavige's middle-class Catholic upbringing in Willingboro, N.J., abruptly changed four decades ago when his childhood asthma led the family to another utopian vision - that of L. Ron Hubbard. Miscavige, 51, a high-school dropout, today is the worldwide leader of the Church of Scientology, which Hubbard founded.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015 | Drew Lazor, For the Daily News
The cashier, an employee of a certain Swedish purveyor of stylish yet affordable home furnishings, took one look at the items I placed on his conveyor belt - six glass bottles with stopper tops - and perked up. "Nice. You making coquito?" He was dead-on. Right now, as we bear down on Christmas, we're in the thick of peak coquito season, when Puerto Ricans swarm their kitchens to blend up big batches of their island's answer to eggnog. To many, the creamy coconut concoction is just as crucial to the holiday experience as candy canes, glazed ham, and cookies shaped like tiny men. But as much fun as it is to make and drink, it serves a more broad-minded purpose: sharing this specialty is more meaningful than sipping it. In the coquito economy, 'tis better to give than to receive - though receiving is pretty sweet, too. 'Little Coconut' While Anglo nog typically comprises a combination of eggs, milk, sugar, and spices cut by any number of spirits, coquito is built upon two elements vital to boricua life: coconut and rum. Sipped cold in small portions, it's sweet, rich, and warmly spiced like conventional nog, but its lighter, yolk-free consistency and well-balanced tropical bite set it apart.
NEWS
May 6, 2010
Letter carriers will collect nonperishable food Saturday as part of a nationwide initiative to fight hunger. The annual initiative, the largest one-day food drive in the nation, is sponsored by the National Association of Letter Carriers and the U.S. Postal Service. Residents should place food items near their mailboxes before mail delivery Saturday. Letter carriers will deliver the donations to a local food bank or pantry. - Kristin E. Holmes
BUSINESS
February 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant is teaming with a Greenwich, Conn.-based private-equity firm to expand the brewpub's regional footprint, making it the latest Philadelphia-area food and beverage chain to get a boost from a deep-pocketed benefactor with a broad geographic scope. Iron Hill received the investment from A&M Capital Opportunities to support the Wilmington-based chain's expansion into new Mid-Atlantic markets, the companies said in a statement Thursday. The investment from AMCO puts Iron Hill on a footing with La Colombe Torrefaction Inc. coffee roasters and Honeygrow fast-casual eateries in tapping private investment to take a locally developed concept to broader markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | Lauren McCutcheon
A few local food trucks that do catering: Sweet Box Serves: Cupcakes Owner: Gretchen Fantini Phone: 215-237-4647 Facebook: Iheartsweetphilly Lil' Dan's Serves: Italian cuisine, sandwiches Co-owner: Daniel Pennachietti Phone: 215-252-1677 Facebook:LildansFood Little Baby's Ice Cream Serves: Ice cream, including vegan Owners: Pete Angevine, Martin Brown,...
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