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NEWS
December 31, 2006 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
With the confidence and swagger of an experienced eater, Marc Bruno approaches the counter at Jim's Steaks on South Street and orders Cheez Whiz with. Between bites into the soft roll full of chopped steak and Cheez Whiz - with grilled onions - he deliberates on its innards. "Notice how they put the cheese on first? I think it makes the cheesesteak drier than Pat's Steaks because the cheese is absorbed in the bread. " Bruno, who moved to Wallingford from Manayunk less than a year ago, is no ordinary cheesesteak fan. He is regional vice president for Aramark's business services.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All you need is shampoo - or so you say. You go to Target, ignore the giant red shopping carts at the entrance, and dart to the health and beauty aisle, determined to stay focused. The next thing you know, you're at the checkout juggling a snowman doormat, a Captain America kiddie T-shirt, a box of Cheerios, and a stash of paper towels big enough for a bomb shelter. You are Target's dream customer, and there are a lot of you out there. But now the Minnesota retailer wants you to drop by more often, so it has come up with new bait it's testing across the Philadelphia area before launching it nationwide.
NEWS
July 27, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob and Leda Muth started their business in Gloucester County eight years ago, there weren't many farmers like them. They set up a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) enterprise in Williamstown that sold memberships to people interested in getting fresh produce every week. Today, more than 400 members each spend $250 to $639 - depending on their plan - to pick up supplies of vegetables and fruits over 16 weeks. Hundreds of others are on a waiting list to join. Across the region, a growing number of CSA farms, many of them certified organic, are taking root as consumers look for locally grown produce at prices that are often less than those in the supermarkets.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A global giant that dishes out food and drink to Olympics athletes, sports fans and schoolchildren will likely add the Chester County Prison to its client roster. The Chester County Commissioners today are expected to award a $795,101 food service contract for the prison to Aramark, the low bidder for a job that has been done by county employees. County Government Services Director Wayne Rothermel said the county can expect $132,000 in savings next year by contracting out the service, primarily due to the economies of scale a company as large as Aramark can offer.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Farm Aid is coming to the Garden State. The annual all-star fund- raising concert, which was founded in 1985 by Willie Nelson after Bob Dylan made remarks in support of American farmers at Live Aid in Philadelphia that year, will take place at the Tweeter Center in Camden on Sept. 30. The 19th Farm Aid - the concert took three years off in the late '80s and early '90s, but has been an annual event since 1992 - will feature Nelson and his three fellow Farm Aid board members - Neil Young, Dave Matthews and John Mellencamp.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting comfortably in the middle of the cool Hanapepe River, Helen Dotimas scraped her knife over the scales of a fish as her great-grandchildren splashed nearby. Devastated by Hurricane Iniki like everyone else, she was nevertheless planning a good dinner - without government help. "We were supposed to pick up supplies, but I think we have enough," said Dotimas, 67. "Usually, I don't do this, but since the hurricane came . . . ," she shrugged, pointing to a plastic bag full of opi fish that her son had speared.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
You just ate a faux-colonial pot pie at City Tavern. You're trying to decide between Pat's and Geno's for your first cheesesteak. And where is that Bookbinder's place? Lemme guess . . . you're not from here. Can I please save you the disappointment of wasting precious meals on tourist traps and faded legends? I've got straight-up advice on the still-genuine spots that make Philadelphia a one-of-a-kind food destination. True, I've spent almost two decades here mostly touting the cosmopolitan dining scene that we've become with star chefs, BYOBs, gastropubs, and hot restaurant neighborhoods like Fishtown and East Passyunk.
FOOD
August 21, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
The iconic foodstuffs of the Delaware Valley are many. The roast pork sandwich has rightfully become a point of pride, recognized in publications local and national. And we can't seem to shake our notoriety for the cheesesteak, even though our local food scene has evolved so far beyond this humble sandwich. There is, however, one summertime staple that is pure Philly, deserves elite culinary status, and is largely unsung. My grandmother made it, and yours might have, too. If you have Italian heritage, a Jersey Shore tradition, and someone who likes to cook in your family, it may well be on this weekend's meal plan.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Give it 34 minutes (or less), and UberEats will bring you a sumptuous dinner. Or a snack. Or something in between. Presuming that you live within the core Philadelphia metro zone where the food-delivery service launches at 7 a.m. Wednesday and can work through the smartphone and tablet-based app that offers menu options and ordering commands. More than 100 local food-makers are partnering on Day One with this Uber ride spin-off, from Starr Restaurants faves El Vez, Pod, Jones, and Buddakan to Philly Pretzel Factory, for that nosh in time that'll save nine.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
At farmers' markets this season, alongside the kale and radishes, there are unaccustomed local offerings. Think tulsi bitters for digestion and relaxation, elderberry syrup for immune support, or raspberry leaf tea for pregnant women. Also new to farmers' market shoppers: disclaimers - that the wares are "not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. " This is an offshoot of the farm-to-table movement: Call it the farm-to-medicine-cabinet movement. It's powered by a new generation of farmer-herbalists like Amanda Midkiff, 26, who last year started Locust Light Farm in New Hope, one of a growing number of farm-based apothecaries in the area.
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