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BUSINESS
October 11, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All you need is shampoo - or so you say. You go to Target, ignore the giant red shopping carts at the entrance, and dart to the health and beauty aisle, determined to stay focused. The next thing you know, you're at the checkout juggling a snowman doormat, a Captain America kiddie T-shirt, a box of Cheerios, and a stash of paper towels big enough for a bomb shelter. You are Target's dream customer, and there are a lot of you out there. But now the Minnesota retailer wants you to drop by more often, so it has come up with new bait it's testing across the Philadelphia area before launching it nationwide.
NEWS
July 27, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob and Leda Muth started their business in Gloucester County eight years ago, there weren't many farmers like them. They set up a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) enterprise in Williamstown that sold memberships to people interested in getting fresh produce every week. Today, more than 400 members each spend $250 to $639 - depending on their plan - to pick up supplies of vegetables and fruits over 16 weeks. Hundreds of others are on a waiting list to join. Across the region, a growing number of CSA farms, many of them certified organic, are taking root as consumers look for locally grown produce at prices that are often less than those in the supermarkets.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A global giant that dishes out food and drink to Olympics athletes, sports fans and schoolchildren will likely add the Chester County Prison to its client roster. The Chester County Commissioners today are expected to award a $795,101 food service contract for the prison to Aramark, the low bidder for a job that has been done by county employees. County Government Services Director Wayne Rothermel said the county can expect $132,000 in savings next year by contracting out the service, primarily due to the economies of scale a company as large as Aramark can offer.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Farm Aid is coming to the Garden State. The annual all-star fund- raising concert, which was founded in 1985 by Willie Nelson after Bob Dylan made remarks in support of American farmers at Live Aid in Philadelphia that year, will take place at the Tweeter Center in Camden on Sept. 30. The 19th Farm Aid - the concert took three years off in the late '80s and early '90s, but has been an annual event since 1992 - will feature Nelson and his three fellow Farm Aid board members - Neil Young, Dave Matthews and John Mellencamp.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting comfortably in the middle of the cool Hanapepe River, Helen Dotimas scraped her knife over the scales of a fish as her great-grandchildren splashed nearby. Devastated by Hurricane Iniki like everyone else, she was nevertheless planning a good dinner - without government help. "We were supposed to pick up supplies, but I think we have enough," said Dotimas, 67. "Usually, I don't do this, but since the hurricane came . . . ," she shrugged, pointing to a plastic bag full of opi fish that her son had speared.
FOOD
September 5, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The farm-to-table movement has become so pervasive, it's moved beyond trend status to the expected norm for any serious modern kitchen. The table-to-farm movement, however, is only just taking root. And as local farmers dedicated to sustainable agriculture strive to share their mission with consumers by bringing them to the source, they are finding that one feature is just as essential as the picturesque landscape and grass-fed meats: a restaurant. "The whole purpose of this farm for me was to raise the food this way and sell directly to people," said Dean Carlson, who recently added an alfresco dinner service to his Wyebrook Farm in Honey Brook, Chester County.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
PETER WOOLSEY should be thankful that acting chops were not a prerequisite when FringeArts came looking for a food guy to run the new restaurant inside its Delaware River headquarters. Aside from appearing in a ninth-grade production of the musical "Gypsy," he doesn't have much experience as a thespian. But that hasn't stopped the chef/owner of Bistrot La Minette from buying into the unexpected parfait of food, drink, culture and entertainment behind La Peg, offering Philly's art and food communities something they've never seen before.
NEWS
May 6, 2010
Letter carriers will collect nonperishable food Saturday as part of a nationwide initiative to fight hunger. The annual initiative, the largest one-day food drive in the nation, is sponsored by the National Association of Letter Carriers and the U.S. Postal Service. Residents should place food items near their mailboxes before mail delivery Saturday. Letter carriers will deliver the donations to a local food bank or pantry. - Kristin E. Holmes
NEWS
July 11, 2014
The deal: It's dangerous to food-shop on an empty stomach, especially at the Whole Foods in Plymouth Meeting, a massive store full of pricey temptations. As a precaution, we walked upstairs to the rooftop taco truck for a pre-shop snack. The menu: Go with one of the beef, pork, fish, chicken or vegan soft taco options ($2.50 each or three for $7.50) or build your own taco, burrito, rice bowl, tostada, nachos or taco salad ($7.50). Some extras, like queso fresco or fajita veggies, are free; some, like arroz con frijoles or guacamole, cost extra.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012 | BY CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
TONY LUKE Jr. isn't nearly the man he used be. And that's one of two reasons the 50-year-old cheesesteak-and-roast-pork entrepreneur may be the happiest he's ever been (more on the second reason later). A year ago, when I profiled the modern-day Renaissance man for the Daily News , Luke didn't so much tip the scales; he crushed them, weighing almost 350 pounds. But just about a year later, here is Luke (real name, Anthony Lucidonio Jr.) sitting at a back table in his favorite Italian eatery, the deep-in-the-heart-of-South Philly Franco & Luigi's, carrying a mere 243 pounds on an impressively toned, 5-foot-9-inch frame.
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