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Local Food

FOOD
September 6, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
How did we ever find food before the Internet? Joining the collection of online tools are a few new apps for the Web and iPhone designed to make foraging easier. Software developer Joe Krill seems, on paper, to be a major food-truck fan, given that he just launched Chowspotter.com , a Web resource for those trying to find Philadelphia's migratory culinarians. But no. "I haven't really eaten at a lot of them," he said. "I tend to eat healthy and pack my own salad. " He simply was looking for something to do on the side.
NEWS
August 18, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the sun set Thursday evening over Germantown Avenue, hungry visitors formed lines dozens deep for local food of all types: caramel ice cream, biscuit sandwiches, pizza baked in a mobile oven. The event, dubbed the "Mount Airy Edition," was the seventh in the Night Market Philadelphia series put on by the Food Trust, a city nonprofit. Other Night Market events have taken place in East Passyunk, Chinatown, and University City. Mount Airy, which hosted a Night Market last August, was the first repeat location.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bumper crop of vegetables and fruits at the Haddonfield Community Gardens is overflowing to the point that local residents plan to share with the local food bank. This week those with extra tomatoes, peppers, or squash can drop donations in bins that will be distributed immediately to those in need. "We have a real shortage of fresh produce," said Lydia Cipriani of the South Jersey Food Bank in Pennsauken. "We have refrigerated space and trucks to distribute it immediately, but there is always a shortage of fresh produce.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's farmer's market season once again, and Bob Pierson is zipping around the edges of Rittenhouse Square this Saturday morning long before any customers arrive, helping farmers hoist their white tents, moving folding tables and heavy coolers, counting heads, and ticking off the minutes till the eight-year-old market reopens, like it's the Kentucky Derby or something. On the dot of 9, Pierson shouts, "OK, we're ready to sell! We're open!" Within a half-hour, the sidewalks around the square are bustling with walkers, runners, and shoppers loaded up with babies, dogs, and canvas bags, many stopping to sample teeny squares of goat cheese or dabs of homemade hummus from the very farmers and artisans who made it. As head of Farm to City, which runs this and 15 other farmer's markets in Philadelphia and the suburbs, Pierson is in his element, which is to say smack dab in the forefront — and middle — of the local food movement in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I'm racking my brain trying to come up with creative ways to eat three square meals on $35 a week. Will $5 a day fill me up? Provide the occasional fruit or vegetable? Can I even stretch $35 over seven days before my money gets funny and my stomach starts to growl? Well, starting Monday, I'll find out by taking the Greater Philadelphia Food Stamp Challenge. With the mean-spirited, totally unnecessary asset test looming May 1 - you know, the Corbett administration mandate that punishes people with more than $5,500 in savings (for those 60 and over it's $9,000)
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Laura Cofsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emily Teel's introduction to the local food industry was as a volunteer. She worked at Reading Terminal Market's Fair Food Farmstand while it was still only a folding table. After a year, she wrote herself a job description and told her employer, "You need to hire me. " In 2005, she became the stand's first manager. "Food became an event," said Teel, now director of public programming for Greener Partners, an organization that supports and raises awareness of local food growers.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Laura Cofsky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emily Teel's introduction to the local food industry was as a volunteer. She worked at Reading Terminal Market's Fair Food Farmstand while it was still only a folding table. After a year, she wrote herself a job description and told her employer, "You need to hire me. " In 2005, she became the stand's first manager. "Food became an event," said Teel, now director of public programming for Greener Partners, an organization that supports and raises awareness of local food growers.
FOOD
March 1, 2012 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The four-course feast featured black-soybean soup with a ceviche of marinated raw beets, turnips, and rutabaga. Next, a salad of hydroponically grown butterhead lettuce with cornmeal croutons tossed in apple cider vinaigrette. The braised lamb, organically grown and grass fed, came with caramelized onions, sweet potato gratin, wilted greens, and cranberry creme. Warm apple cake with cheddar cheese ice cream rounded out the meal. Everything on that farm-to-plate menu was grown within about 100 miles, no easy feat in winter.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jere Gettle's been called "a young, countrified Elvis," and you can see why. The guy runs around in hokey tunics and overalls, goofy shirts and hats. Please read The Heirloom Life Gardener, by Jere and his wife, Emilee, with Meghan Sutherland, just published by Hyperion ($29.99). You'll learn a ton about this unusual fellow, who deserves respect for his family's commitment to the local food movement - specifically, heirloom seeds from around the world, which they sell through their 13-year-old company, Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, in Mansfield, Mo. In 2009, they also converted a 1920s bank building in Petaluma, Calif., into the Seed Bank, and last year, they bought the venerable seed company Comstock, Ferre & Co., in Wethersfield, Conn.
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