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Local Food

NEWS
March 17, 2011
By Bryan Collins The face of City Council is changing. At least five new Council members will replace retiring incumbents in January, and there is fierce competition for other seats. This new energy should be harnessed to enhance the city's environmental quality, strengthen its neighborhoods, and increase its economic competitiveness. During the 2007 mayoral election, the Next Great City coalition, led by PennFuture and 130 partner organizations, urged the candidates to focus on neighborhood quality-of-life issues such as parks, energy efficiency, recycling, and transportation.
FOOD
March 3, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dinner at the Kensington home of John Vick and Amanda Jaffe is as simple as roast chicken, mashed potatoes, salad, and biscuits - and as complicated as farm-raised, sustainably grown, homemade, and locally sourced. Jaffe uses chicken from Griggstown Quail Farm outside Princeton, unaltered by hormones or antibiotics. Vick mashes the All Blue potatoes, a variety that produces colorful flesh as well as skin, from Tuscarora Organic Growers in Hustontown, Pa., adding butter from Hometown Provisions in Lancaster County and whole milk from Trickling Springs Creamery in Chambersburg, Pa. For his biscuits, Vick blends heirloom cornmeal from Rineer Family Farms in Lancaster and buttermilk from Maplehofe Dairy in Quarryville, Pa. The salad greens, baby arugula, and baby spinach were grown hydroponically at Woodland Produce in Fairton, N.J., by a farmer who recently got a grant from the USDA to install photovoltaic cells in order to run his greenhouses on solar energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
THINK GREAT American food towns and what comes to mind? Definitely San Francisco/Napa for wine and farm-to-table cuisine. Then there's New Orleans for eclectic Creole bites, Memphis, Tenn., for barbecue. And don't forget Boulder, Colo., home to an awesome farmer's market and a slew of innovative food companies. Or Portland, Maine, where craft beer and fresh seafood form a perfect union. New York? Natch. But aren't we forgetting something? How about our hometown? Philadelphia deserves much more than its connection to the cheesesteak when it comes to making a culinary splash.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Something was cooking yesterday at the Reading Terminal Market, but it wasn't just DiNic's roast pork. The Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corp. launched the Philly Homegrown project inside the market to get more people to buy locally grown food. Philly Homegrown was created to help the region become known for more than just cheesesteaks, said Jeff Guaracino, vice president of communications for GPTMC. "People don't normally think of Philadelphia as this place with lots of healthy, home-grown food," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
For those who desire to vote with their food dollars in support of a different food system, Milk & Honey Market at 45th Street and Baltimore Avenue is a good option. The market focuses on locavore, whose definition depends on whom you ask. For some, it means adding as much fresh and local foods to the shopping cart as possible. Others have geographic boundaries - eating or drinking nothing that comes from beyond a 150-mile radius or, in the extreme, 50 miles. I'll admit my bias here.
FOOD
November 26, 2009 | By Christine Burns Rudalevige FOR THE INQUIRER
Smoked duck with lingonberry and pecan glaze, braised mustard greens and oyster chowder were on the menu at Philadelphia University's Thanksgiving dinner for 600 students last week. Chefs were carving roasted turkey; cherry chutney, parsnip mash, and a cranberry and sour cherry polenta tart were among the offerings. If that wasn't impressive enough for a college dining hall, consider this: The entire menu was sourced locally, the free-range turkey from Koch's Farm in Lewistown Valley, the produce from 12 surrounding farms, the oysters from Long Island (OK, a stretch there, but still within 150 miles)
BUSINESS
October 11, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All you need is shampoo - or so you say. You go to Target, ignore the giant red shopping carts at the entrance, and dart to the health and beauty aisle, determined to stay focused. The next thing you know, you're at the checkout juggling a snowman doormat, a Captain America kiddie T-shirt, a box of Cheerios, and a stash of paper towels big enough for a bomb shelter. You are Target's dream customer, and there are a lot of you out there. But now the Minnesota retailer wants you to drop by more often, so it has come up with new bait it's testing across the Philadelphia area before launching it nationwide.
NEWS
July 27, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob and Leda Muth started their business in Gloucester County eight years ago, there weren't many farmers like them. They set up a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) enterprise in Williamstown that sold memberships to people interested in getting fresh produce every week. Today, more than 400 members each spend $250 to $639 - depending on their plan - to pick up supplies of vegetables and fruits over 16 weeks. Hundreds of others are on a waiting list to join. Across the region, a growing number of CSA farms, many of them certified organic, are taking root as consumers look for locally grown produce at prices that are often less than those in the supermarkets.
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the demand for emergency food in the region up 31 percent over last year, two hunger relief agencies - Philabundance and the Food Bank of South Jersey - joined The Inquirer yesterday to launch a food drive. The increased need for food comes at a time when food supplies are down 26 percent over last year, said Bill Clark, Philabundance executive director. Inquirer publisher Brian P. Tierney said in a statement that "our region is hurting and we want to help. " The food drive is a "meaningful way for our locally owned company to give back to the community that has supported us for so many years," he said.
FOOD
January 25, 2007 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Zelov has a rare job: He's a full-time farmer in Philadelphia. Weavers Way Co-op in Mount Airy hired him last week to manage the organization's tiny but expanding farm at Awbury Arboretum in Germantown. Zelov's new position is the latest sign of growth in Philadelphia's local-food and urban farming scene, which was celebrated at last week's Urban Sustainability Forum at the Academy of Natural Sciences. "If you live in Philadelphia, want to buy local food, want to use your food dollar to make a positive impact on the environment and the local company, and you are willing to do a little research, you have a lot of opportunity to do so," Ann Karlen, director of the White Dog Cafe Foundation's Fair Food Project, said during her remarks.
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