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Local Food

NEWS
July 27, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob and Leda Muth started their business in Gloucester County eight years ago, there weren't many farmers like them. They set up a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) enterprise in Williamstown that sold memberships to people interested in getting fresh produce every week. Today, more than 400 members each spend $250 to $639 - depending on their plan - to pick up supplies of vegetables and fruits over 16 weeks. Hundreds of others are on a waiting list to join. Across the region, a growing number of CSA farms, many of them certified organic, are taking root as consumers look for locally grown produce at prices that are often less than those in the supermarkets.
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the demand for emergency food in the region up 31 percent over last year, two hunger relief agencies - Philabundance and the Food Bank of South Jersey - joined The Inquirer yesterday to launch a food drive. The increased need for food comes at a time when food supplies are down 26 percent over last year, said Bill Clark, Philabundance executive director. Inquirer publisher Brian P. Tierney said in a statement that "our region is hurting and we want to help. " The food drive is a "meaningful way for our locally owned company to give back to the community that has supported us for so many years," he said.
FOOD
January 25, 2007 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Zelov has a rare job: He's a full-time farmer in Philadelphia. Weavers Way Co-op in Mount Airy hired him last week to manage the organization's tiny but expanding farm at Awbury Arboretum in Germantown. Zelov's new position is the latest sign of growth in Philadelphia's local-food and urban farming scene, which was celebrated at last week's Urban Sustainability Forum at the Academy of Natural Sciences. "If you live in Philadelphia, want to buy local food, want to use your food dollar to make a positive impact on the environment and the local company, and you are willing to do a little research, you have a lot of opportunity to do so," Ann Karlen, director of the White Dog Cafe Foundation's Fair Food Project, said during her remarks.
NEWS
December 31, 2006 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
With the confidence and swagger of an experienced eater, Marc Bruno approaches the counter at Jim's Steaks on South Street and orders Cheez Whiz with. Between bites into the soft roll full of chopped steak and Cheez Whiz - with grilled onions - he deliberates on its innards. "Notice how they put the cheese on first? I think it makes the cheesesteak drier than Pat's Steaks because the cheese is absorbed in the bread. " Bruno, who moved to Wallingford from Manayunk less than a year ago, is no ordinary cheesesteak fan. He is regional vice president for Aramark's business services.
NEWS
October 22, 2006 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
It had been an exceptionally busy summer of eating on the job in Philadelphia, and I was hoping for a little break. Perhaps something a bit lighter than the usual restaurant critic's fare. Maybe even home-cooked in the rustic quietude of a mountaintop retreat. So, what was I thinking going on "vacation" to Vermont? The Green Mountain State has rustic quietude to spare, of course. But my resolve to go easy on the food hunt began to crumble within moments of our arrival when, stocking up at Singleton's Store in Proctorsville, I found myself lingering near the giant wheel of Cabot cheddar in back, where a butcher's counter also yawned with beautiful slabs of cob-smoked bacon and storemade country sausage.
NEWS
August 31, 2006
Re: "Suburban dining: First, you wait," by staff writer Adam Fifield, July 16. We all seem to be living among suburban sheep who think that Cheesecake Factory, Outback Steakhouse and the like are the only eating places around. I shook my head in disbelief when I read the quotes from the masses and restaurateurs. I also couldn't believe that the president of Outback Steakhouse, Ben Novello, had the nerve not to apologize for the way his patrons are sometimes treated - like the cattle he serves.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Farm Aid is coming to the Garden State. The annual all-star fund- raising concert, which was founded in 1985 by Willie Nelson after Bob Dylan made remarks in support of American farmers at Live Aid in Philadelphia that year, will take place at the Tweeter Center in Camden on Sept. 30. The 19th Farm Aid - the concert took three years off in the late '80s and early '90s, but has been an annual event since 1992 - will feature Nelson and his three fellow Farm Aid board members - Neil Young, Dave Matthews and John Mellencamp.
NEWS
June 28, 2006 | By Marty Spiegel
We were out at 5:30 a.m. putting up handmade signs with directions. Our banner had been hung over the train station canopy. And we'd done as much local advertising as we could with our limited budget. It was the first day of the new farmers' market in downtown Swarthmore, and everyone was nervous. We had worked with Bob Pierson of Farm to City, the organization that helps communities set up farm markets, and had four of our five farmers ready to go on the last Saturday in May. But, we worried, what if we threw a party and nobody came?
BUSINESS
May 30, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Franca Fusco is particular about what she eats. "I'm so worried that the things I buy from the grocery store are not as nutritionally wholesome as they are if I grow them myself," she said, "or buy them from a local farmer. " Thanks to Fusco and other consumers who are putting a lot more thought and effort into food, sales of locally grown food are climbing, forcing changes in the U.S. food system, which excels at moving goods over long distances. Consumers have lots of reasons to buy local food when possible: They think it is fresher and more nutritious; they want to keep small farmers in business; they like unusual varieties of vegetables that do not ship well; they want their children to know that food ultimately comes from farms, not factories and supermarkets; and they think it saves energy.
SPORTS
May 9, 2001 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Brad Kielinski performs volunteer work the same way he plays sports - with every body part moving furiously. Except his mouth. The senior at Kennedy-Kenrick High goes all out, all the time, whether he's playing soccer or basketball, running and jumping in track and field, or helping out at the Patrician Society of Central Montgomery County, which is located in Norristown. Whenever he's asked, and even when's not, Kielinski can be found at the Patrician Society's emergency food cupboard.
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