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Lockerbie

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NEWS
August 20, 2003
In a world beset by terrorism, some acts are so evil they can't be forgotten. Such an event happened on Dec. 21, 1988, when a bomb tore apart Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, as it journeyed toward New York. Dead were 259 passengers and crew, including 35 Syracuse University exchange students heading home for the holidays; 11 residents on the ground died instantly as pieces of the burning plane hit their homes. Last week - nearly 15 years after the bombing and more than two years after an international court held a Libyan guilty for it - Libya's government admitted responsibility and agreed to pay at least $5 million to each of the families of the 270 who died.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | Associated Press Inquirer staff writer Douglas A. Campbell contributed to this article
Edward Blaus said he had never expected to trigger the celebration that rocked this community of 2,500 nestled in farmlands 60 miles south of Edinburgh yesterday. The 14-year-old from Winslow Township, Camden County, wanted to compensate the children of Lockerbie somehow for the Christmas they missed after Pan Am's Flight 103 exploded and crashed into their community, killing 11 residents and all 259 aboard the plane. The Dec. 21 crash also wiped out an entire section of 41 homes.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Adel Omran and Lee Keath, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, a former Libyan intelligence officer who was the only person ever convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, died Sunday at home in Tripoli, nearly three years after he was released from a Scottish prison to the outrage of the relatives of the attack's 270 victims. He was 60. Scotland released Megrahi on Aug. 20, 2009, on compassionate grounds, allowing him to return home to die after he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. At the time, doctors predicted he had only three months to live.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, USA Today and the Washington Post
Prince Charles will visit Lockerbie, the Scottish site of the Pan Am Flight 103 disaster, on Jan. 24, Buckingham Palace said yesterday. The announcement came after massive criticism of the British royals last week when none of them showed up for a memorial service for the 270 victims. A palace source said Queen Elizabeth believed it was a mistake that no royal-family member went to the service. "There is a lot of heart-searching going on," the source said. Meanwhile, Elizabeth is in trouble with World War II vets, among others, for her decision to send Prince Philip to Emperor Hirohito's funeral next month.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bonnie O'Connor's grief began to harden into anger as she waited in a livestock warehouse at Kennedy Airport to claim her brother's body. Her brother, John Ahern, was killed in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 last December. This was his final homecoming. O'Connor was surprised to find no representative of Pan Am or the U.S. government waiting at the warehouse. She was even more surprised when her brother's coffin arrived without ceremony, packed in a cardboard shipping box. As she watched a forklift move the box into the chilly warehouse, past pens where cattle were housed, O'Connor said her rage began to rise.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | By Sheila Hamilton
The men and women of Lockerbie saw things that no one should ever have to see. They did things that few people outside the town ever knew about. For years, Bill Parr would wake in the night screaming. His nightmares would come in Technicolor, and the bodies he found would speak to him. Those of us who drove into Lockerbie, Scotland, as reporters on that terrible night of Dec. 21, 1988, when Pan Am 103 en route from London bound for New York was blown into more than 10,000 pieces over Lockerbie, saw only part of the story.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | by Kathleen Flynn, New York Times
When I heard about TWA Flight 800, I could barely breathe. J.P., my 21-year-old son, was killed in an explosion on Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. My family was forced to deal not only with the loss but also with unconscionable treatment by Pan American World Airways. From what I have heard about this latest tragedy, it seems the airlines have learned little. In the hours after the crash, TWA could barely get its facts straight. It got the departure time wrong. It issued an incorrect 800 number for information.
NEWS
February 2, 2001
The Lockerbie verdict offers the faintest of hopes that one day the truth about the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 may emerge. Not because the trial itself came near to answering all the questions, but because it provides the solid foundation on which any future inquiry will rest.. . .Everyone, including the Libyan regime, seemed content that the case should be self-contained and placed at the door of the two Libyans accused. That in itself should send out warning signs - it was all just a little too convenient.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After the only man convicted of the 1988 Lockerbie plane bombing was reported to have died Sunday, two South Jersey families who lost daughters that day were left to wonder if anyone else will be brought to justice. Susan Cohen, of Cape May Court House, and Stan Maslowski, of Haddonfield, say there are lingering questions about who else was responsible for the bombing of a Pan Am plane that exploded over Scotland, killing 259 onboard and 11 on the ground. Cohen, whose 20-year-old daughter Theodora, a Syracuse University theater major, was among the dead, worries that the U.S. and British governments will see the death of Abdel Baset al-Megrahi as an excuse to stop investigating the bombing.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stan and Norma Maslowski's phone started ringing at 6:25 yesterday morning and it didn't stop ringing all day. The attention didn't surprise the Maslowskis, who had spent the night before tossing and turning, thinking about the crash of TWA Flight 800. The Maslowskis didn't have a family member aboard Flight 800, but the circumstances reminded them of a night 7 1/2 years ago when they did have one on a flight that crashed. On Dec. 21, 1988, their 30-year-old daughter, Diane, died when a bomb sent Pan Am's Flight 103 tumbling in a fireball from the skies over Lockerbie, Scotland.
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NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Cassandra Vinograd, Associated Press
LONDON - British Prime Minister David Cameron made an unexpected visit to the Libyan capital of Tripoli on Thursday and announced that British police officers will travel to the North African nation to investigate the Lockerbie bombing. He also held bilateral talks to explore what support and expertise Britain can offer to Libya to strengthen its security and defeat terrorism. Cameron told a news conference in Tripoli he was "delighted" that police would be able to visit Libya and "look into the issues" around the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over the Scottish town.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
After the only man convicted of the 1988 Lockerbie plane bombing was reported to have died Sunday, two South Jersey families who lost daughters that day were left to wonder if anyone else would be brought to justice. Susan Cohen of Cape May Court House and Stan Maslowski of Haddonfield say there are lingering questions about who else was responsible for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 that exploded over Scotland, killing 259 onboard and 11 on the ground. Cohen - whose daughter Theodora, 20, a Syracuse University theater major, was among the dead - worries that the U.S. and British governments will see the death of Abdel Baset al-Megrahi as an excuse to stop investigating the bombing.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After the only man convicted of the 1988 Lockerbie plane bombing was reported to have died Sunday, two South Jersey families who lost daughters that day were left to wonder if anyone else will be brought to justice. Susan Cohen, of Cape May Court House, and Stan Maslowski, of Haddonfield, say there are lingering questions about who else was responsible for the bombing of a Pan Am plane that exploded over Scotland, killing 259 onboard and 11 on the ground. Cohen, whose 20-year-old daughter Theodora, a Syracuse University theater major, was among the dead, worries that the U.S. and British governments will see the death of Abdel Baset al-Megrahi as an excuse to stop investigating the bombing.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Adel Omran and Lee Keath, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - Abdel Baset al-Megrahi, a former Libyan intelligence officer who was the only person ever convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, died Sunday at home in Tripoli, nearly three years after he was released from a Scottish prison to the outrage of the relatives of the attack's 270 victims. He was 60. Scotland released Megrahi on Aug. 20, 2009, on compassionate grounds, allowing him to return home to die after he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer. At the time, doctors predicted he had only three months to live.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kara Weipz cried Thursday at her Mount Laurel home when she saw the news report of ousted Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's death. Once again, she was reminded of her 20-year-old brother, Rick Monetti, who was killed in the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland - a 1988 attack later tied to Gadhafi. "I truly believe [Gadhafi's] suffering and pain will endure forever," said Weipz, 38. "He will always have to answer to someone higher than me and receive punishment for the acts he's committed.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kara Weipz cried Thursday at her Mount Laurel home when she saw the news report of ousted Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's death. Once again, she was reminded of her 20-year-old brother, Rick Monetti, who was killed in the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland - a 1988 terrorist attack later tied to Gadhafi. "I truly believe [Gadhafi's] suffering and pain will endure forever," said Weipz, 38. "He will always have to answer to someone higher than me and receive punishment for the acts he's committed.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Scotland has asked Libya's new authorities to help track down those responsible for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103 over the Scottish town of Lockerbie, but the Libyan transitional justice minister said Monday that "the case is closed. " In Tripoli, the minister, Mohammed al-Alagi, noted that the only person charged in the bombing - former Libyan intelligence officer Abdelbaset al-Megrahi - had been freed from a Scottish prison on compassionate grounds in 2009 because of illness.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By MICHAEL EICHERT
STRUGGLING to recover from the financial assault by Wall Street, and drowning in foreclosures, lost jobs, rising taxes, escalating medical costs, cuts to school programs which inevitably lead to burgeoning prisons, we're engaged in yet another military conflict in a Muslim nation. We're barely out of Iraq, which has cost U.S. taxpayers a staggering $782 billion. (Sound familiar? It's the amount of our economic stimulus.) Also entrenched in a futile conflict in Afghanistan, which has cost more than $390 billion and is climbing, we find ourselves reluctantly dragged by our European allies, the Arab League and the plaintive cries from Libyan rebels who faced extermination by their leader of 42 years, the delusional madman Moammar Gadhafi.
NEWS
August 8, 2010 | By Robert P. George
The U.S. State Department has attempted to quell the growing outrage over last year's release of the Lockerbie bomber from a Scottish prison by publishing a letter it says proves the Obama administration's sustained opposition to letting this mass murderer return to Libya a free man. The letter proves precisely the opposite, and the American people - and citizens of the other 20 nations who lost countrymen in the bombing - should be more outraged than...
NEWS
August 26, 2009 | By Trudy Rubin
How could anyone release the only man convicted in the bombing of Pan Am flight 103? Does anyone really believe that Scottish officials sent Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi back to Libya for "compassionate" reasons? Yes, the former Libyan intelligence agent is purportedly dying of cancer. But as a London Times columnist asked: Would the same Scots release Robert Black, the Scottish serial killer of young girls, if he were on death's door? Clearly something is going on here that has little to do with compassion.
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