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SPORTS
January 7, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
After a long, overnight negotiating session lasting nearly 16 hours - or roughly the time it takes the Eagles and Chip Kelly to go from calamari to cheesecake - the National Hockey League and its players emerged from a New York hotel room early Sunday morning with a new collective bargaining agreement. There are three ways to look at this news, which was delivered in the wee hours by commissioner Gary Bettman and union boss Donald Fehr to a small contingent of unwashed reporters, five guys listening on radio in Canada, and exactly no one else.
SPORTS
October 2, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Fred Slaughter thought he was just beginning to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement for the NBA's staff of 58 referees. He didn't anticipate what he terms a "take it or we'll lock you out" offer. But that's what the attorney for the National Association of Basketball Referees says he received last Thursday. And that is why the league imposed a lockout yesterday and began its annual training camp for officials with more than 40 replacements. Slaughter believes the replacements would work in two-man crews, rather than the usual three.
SPORTS
September 9, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
When the ballots are counted Tuesday in New York to determine whether NBA players want to decertify their union, there will be at least one fewer vote than anticipated. That is because Golden State's Rony Seikaly could not make last-minute flight connections that would have sent him from his native Beirut, Lebanon, through London to New York in time to vote Thursday afternoon. "He called to say that he had arrived at the airport in Beirut only to find that the flight had been oversold," said Steve Kauffman, Seikaly's agent.
SPORTS
September 27, 1994 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
A lockout of NBA players by the league's owners on or about Thanksgiving? In a pro sports world living uncomfortably with a major league baseball strike and the threat of a lockout in the NHL, what's one more dark, foreboding rumor in one more sport? Sorry, but even though no one professes to know the exact source, the dreaded specter of a lockout has begun to surface in pro basketball as well. And that's in a league that has never experienced a work stoppage, that three times has begun seasons without a collective-bargaining agreement with its players.
SPORTS
September 18, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
The lead negotiator and spokesman for the NBA's referees union said a lockout appears "imminent and unavoidable" following the latest breakdown in talks. Lamell McMorris said the officials made another $1 million in concessions in a proposal yesterday, but believes it's evident the league is not interested in further discussions. The officials then headed home after spending the last 24 hours meeting in Chicago. The contract between the NBA and its officials expired Sept. 1 and the sides have been trying to reach a new, 2-year deal.
SPORTS
December 20, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
The Chicago Blackhawks were sued yesterday by a season ticketholder who claims the team violated the Consumer Fraud Act by failing to give full refunds to fans after the NHL lockout. Darryl Taggart claims that at the time the Blackhawks were selling season tickets, team officials knew reaching a collective bargaining agreement with players was unlikely. The lawsuit, filed in Cook County Circuit Court, contends the Blackhawks have not refunded the $1,000 premium paid by season ticketholders in the "club section.
SPORTS
March 19, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
With talk of a possible lockout that could substantially curtail or even cancel next season, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman believes a work stoppage can be avoided. Bettman, speaking with reporters before the Rangers played the Capitals in Washington last night, said the expiration of the collective bargaining agreement on Sept. 15 gives the league and union an opportunity to fix the sport's problems. "I view September 2004 as an opportunity to go forward," Bettman said. "I'm optimistic.
SPORTS
July 21, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Guess who's coming to breakfast? The answer is Billy Hunter, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association. Hunter is scheduled to meet this morning with NBA commissioner David Stern to see whether they can make any headway in ending the work stoppage that has been in effect since July 1. When the most recent collective bargaining agreement expired June 30, the owners locked out the players. "I'm prepared to sit down and engage in compromise negotiations," said Hunter, who spoke with Stern last Thursday to arrange the meeting.
SPORTS
July 10, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The NBA imposed a lockout that lasted slightly longer than 2 1/2 hours. The 76ers, on the other hand, couldn't keep Jerry Stackhouse out of the gym. All 29 NBA teams can go back in the gym today while a moratorium extended until 5 p.m. tomorrow on personnel moves allows time to finalize adjustments on a collective bargaining agreement. Yesterday's lockout went into effect after an all-night bargaining session in which the union waited until just before dawn to ask for an additional $50 million in profit-sharing revenue from the league's television contracts.
SPORTS
March 11, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
Baseball's lockout enters Day 25 today, with no end in sight. With that in mind, we've asked - and answered - 10 questions about the negotiations and what the lockout will mean to fans. Question - Why is the issue of eligibility for arbitration after two or three years so important? Answer - A lot of history and bad blood are rooted in this issue. For more than a decade, players had the right to take their salary disputes to arbitration after completing two years in the majors.
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SPORTS
December 1, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
DeMeco Ryans knew the severity of his injury the moment it happened. He did not need an official diagnosis or prognosis from the medical staff to realize the daunting recovery ahead of him. Ryans, the Eagles inside linebacker who was the defensive captain and one of the most respected players on the team, ruptured his right Achilles tendon on Nov. 2 against the Houston Texans. It's the same injury Ryans suffered four seasons earlier and has plagued other players. It came on the same field as the first injury and in just about the same spot.
SPORTS
September 25, 2014
TORONTO - Chris Pronger has not skated in an NHL game since Nov. 19, 2011. Yet Pronger, in addition to every player on the Flyers' payroll in 2012-13, will receive a long-awaited bonus check in the mail next month. Every player with an NHL contract from the lockout-shortened campaign will receive the first of three "transition payments" on Oct. 15, when their first paycheck is distributed. The payment was first reported by sportsnet.ca's Chris Johnston. The transition payments, doled out on Oct. 15 in 2014, 2015 and 2016, were negotiated as part of the NHL's new Collective Bargaining Agreement when the lockout ended.
NEWS
May 14, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Workers returned to the job at the Pennsylvania Convention Center Monday morning as members of two fellow unions protested against being shut out from the sprawling complex. Police outnumbered the union protesters. During the morning, about 40 to 50 demonstrators - most, if not all, from Teamsters Local 107 - held positions around the sprawling complex, carrying signs saying "Locked Out" and shouting at workers entering the building. Some members of Carpenters Union Local 8 handed out literature to passersby.
SPORTS
December 22, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Howe, the soft-spoken son of a hockey icon, the former Flyers defenseman who went into the Hall of Fame in 2011, wanted no parts of collaborating on a book. "My life is boring; why would anyone want to read about me?" he said to Jay Greenberg, an author and one-time Flyers beat writer who approached him with the idea. Greenberg persisted, even after Howe told him he didn't like his sample chapter, calling it too "jumpy. " Finally, after a lot of friendly give and take, Greenberg struck a chord.
SPORTS
October 3, 2013 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
SCOTT HARTNELL left with his mind in a million places. His end-of-season exit interview with Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren was blunt - as it usually is with Holmgren. "He was pissed off at the end of the year," Holmgren said. "He was pissed off at his game. He said to me that he looked like a third-line player out there. "My comment to him was something like, 'Yeah, and a bad one at that.' Then, he went and did something about it. " For Hartnell, much of his embarrassing year can be traced to the NHL lockout and his lack of conditioning.
SPORTS
June 10, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TWO FRANCHISES, rich in history, talent and star power. Two winning teams that know what it takes to bring home the Stanley Cup. Intrigue, in the form of a schedule that kept them away from each other for an entire season. Oh, there's plenty to love about this series. The Stanley Cup finals kick off Wednesday night when the Chicago Blackhawks host the Boston Bruins in the first finals matchup of Original Six franchises since Montreal beat the New York Rangers in five games way back in 1979.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The rebranded NBC Sports Network is looking for sports fans. The National Hockey League lockout and a transition to new sports programming - after dropping UFC mixed-martial arts bouts and bull-riding - resulted in the Comcast Corp.-owned 24-hour sports network posting eight months of lower prime-time viewership in 2012. In December, its worst month, an average of 58,000 homes tuned in to the channel during prime time compared with 158,000 homes the previous year, according to Nielsen.
SPORTS
January 26, 2013 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
It doesn't matter how you get there - losing streaks, injuries, labor wars, plague of locusts. Whatever. Going eight months without winning a game is enough to make everybody start thinking dark thoughts. The Flyers came back from the NHL's farcical lockout and immediately lost their first three games. They did not look especially sharp doing it. Was that a side effect of the long layoff and short prep time, or was it a sign that this roster just isn't talented enough to contend?
SPORTS
January 20, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The nerves were jangling and his heart was beating loud in his ears when Scott Laughton jumped onto the ice in an NHL game for the first time in his young life on Saturday. The Flyers' first-round draft pick, just 18 years old and trying desperately not to get sent back to juniors, also had the advice of teammate Scott Hartnell in his ears. "He just told me to play my game and do the things that got me here," Laughton said. "Do every little thing right and the rest will take care of itself.
SPORTS
January 20, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a 113-day lockout, months of posturing and legal mumbo-jumbo, and fans being aggravated to the Nth degree, the abbreviated NHL season arrives Saturday. Here are some of the story lines: The Nash factor The New York Rangers have the best goalie on the planet, Henrik Lundqvist, and many feel they have added the missing piece that will bring them their first Stanley Cup since 1994: Rick Nash. If Nash, one of the game's best snipers, can get past the culture shock of going from Columbus to Broadway, he complements a deep lineup (Brad Richards, Ryan Callahan, Marian Gaborik et al)
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