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NEWS
July 17, 1986 | By Brian Miller, Special to The Inquirer
The Ardmore Manor American Legion baseball team got good and dirty Sunday. And that was just fine with coach Paul Bogosian. The Manor celebrated its 6-1 victory over Wayne by practicing belly-flops down the side of a muddy hill next to the Wayne field after a thunderstorm hit the area. It was just schoolboy fun for late adolescents, but it proved to Bogosian how much camaraderie his undefeated team has. "They were playing like little kids splashing around in the puddles," Bogosian said.
NEWS
January 2, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
No African head wrap or oversize Afro for Erykah Badu on New Year's Eve: the Dallas funk-soul diva shuffled onstage at the House of Blues in Atlantic City in full flapper regalia, as if walking straight out of the Harlem Renaissance. Bundled in an overcoat and peering from under a broad-brimmed hat, Badu put down her overnight bag and thermos full of "sugar water" and locked into a laid-back groove, singing: "I came to hear the band today/I ain't thinking about you/I came to hear my drummer play.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | By Barbara Smith
Linda Wright Moore's column (Dec. 8) on black women's natural hair was very encouraging. I started my natural locks just before the Million Woman March in Philadelphia in October 1997. "Locks" is the popular term for natural hair sectioned and twisted. "Everything You Need to Know About Hairlocking" by Nekheria Evans gives information on the spiritual and historical nature of locks. Coily hair, she writes, clearly distinguishes people of African ancestry from all others. "Dreadlocks" relates specifically to a way of life that is known as Rastafarianism.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | By Maureen Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County Jail inmates have caused security problems at the Woodbury prison by devising a way to dismantle electrical cell-door locks with a ballpoint pen. The broken locks have prompted the jail to bypass fire laws and install deadbolts on about a dozen of the cells. The deadbolts would need to be opened manually in case of a fire, said Sheriff James N. Hogan. The electrical locks are opened automatically by one switch in control rooms located outside the cells. The problem was caused in recent weeks by inmates who have sabotaged 30 of the jail's 200 cell doors with a procedure that Hogan said could take less than three minutes.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Whitman signed legislation into law yesterday that will require every handgun sold in the state to come equipped with a trigger lock or lock box - making New Jersey one of only four states requiring the devices. "Trigger locks are designed to prevent the accidental discharge of a loaded handgun," Whitman said during a signing ceremony in her outer office. She was flanked by legislators who sponsored the bill in both houses. "By adding this safety device to handguns, responsible gun owners can help ensure that their guns are not used by irresponsible parties - especially by children, whose curiosity often exceeds their judgment, with tragic results," she said.
NEWS
May 29, 2004 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Darby Mayor Paula Brown locked herself in her office yesterday after the Borough Council tried to change the locks. She remained there last night as about a half-dozen supporters marched outside the Borough Hall. President Janice Davis, a member of the council faction that opposes Brown, said she told Brown weeks ago that the Police Department needed more space and that council members wanted Brown to move into another office in the borough's Resource Center on Ninth Street. Davis said she told Brown she had until yesterday to move.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Len Boselovic, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Many of Pennsylvania's - and America's - locks and dams are on the brink of failure, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the agency charged with maintaining them. Conditions along the nation's 11,000-mile inland waterway system constitute "a crisis headed for a catastrophe," one high-ranking corps official said last month at an industry meeting in Washington. The precarious status of the waterway system stems from what government and industry officials agree is a broken method of maintaining and replacing aging locks and dams.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | By RICHARD E. ROY
WE'RE NOT interested in stirring up controversy. We're not interested in starting arguments. We are interested in producing and delivering clean, safe water and protecting lives and property. Not that your readers would know it from Carla Anderson's unfair and irresponsibly reported column on fire-hydrant locks and illegally opened hydrants (Aug. 7). In that column, Ms. Anderson, the Urban Warrior, starts by asserting the water department's center compression locks (CCLs)
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Roger Runningen and Brian Faler, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - President Obama signed into law a catchall government-funding bill that ends the 2013 budget fight and locks in $85 billion in budget cuts the president opposes. With Obama's signature, day-to-day operations of cabinet departments and federal agencies will continue without interruption through Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year. With the automatic cuts known as sequestration, the spending will amount to about $984 billion. The previous funding authorization had been due to expire Wednesday.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the owner of Lestardo's bar and package store in Bear, Del., the last call early Saturday was one her customers never heard. Avon Lestardo, 61, called and called for hours from the trunk of her car, where she had been left by a robber who had been awaiting her return home shortly after 2:30 a.m. The robber, wearing a Halloween-type mask, forced Lestardo into the trunk after a struggle, police said. New Castle County police said Thomas P. Pendergast of the first block of Cornwall Drive, New Castle, had been waiting when Lestardo pulled into her garage at her home near Newark, carrying about $48,000 in cash, checks and Delaware lottery receipts.
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SPORTS
September 7, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
This is Pat Narduzzi's second season as the head coach at Pittsburgh, so he's never had the chance to experience the heightened intensity - not to mention the bad blood - that used to mark the Panthers' 96-game rivalry with Penn State. However, with the two teams preparing to end a 16-year hiatus and meet Saturday at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Narduzzi wants to make sure his team's preparation time is unaffected, which is why he told reporters Monday that his players would be off-limits for interviews all week.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Jeff McLane, STAFF WRITER
It isn't very often that a 33-year-old running back receives a contract extension, let alone one during the first week of training camp. But that's just what the Eagles did on Friday when they added another year onto the remaining year of Darren Sproles' deal. The Eagles have been generous to their elder players this offseason. They gave 31-year-old tight end Brent Celek a two-year extension in January, and they retained 34-year-old tackle Jason Peters even though his salary and last season's regression suggested they might do otherwise.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Dave Chappelle never just phones it in. The comic is always improvising, said his new friend Graham Dugoni. Fans lucky to score Chappelle tickets for shows Tuesday and Wednesday at the new Punch Line Philly comedy club in Fishtown will be required to do the same, living in the moment by going "phone-free" and concentrating "Yondr" on the talent. For this, all praise and maybe a few curses are due to a Dugoni invention of the same name, Yondr, which Chappelle now uses to protect his routine from getting posted online.
NEWS
May 31, 2016
Solid new evidence on preventing drunken-driving deaths validates Pennsylvania's new law requiring more DUI offenders to have ignition interlock devices on their cars. That's also the right route for New Jersey, which is considering similar legislation. In Pennsylvania, the long drive to require most first-time offenders to have Breathalyzer-equipped locks on their cars ended successfully with Gov. Wolf's signature last week. The milestone came just before the long Memorial Day weekend, a time when typically heavy traffic too often leads to fatalities when alcohol becomes part of the mix. The new law could lead to a 15 percent reduction in alcohol-related highway deaths within a few years, according to University of Pennsylvania researchers, who surveyed states that already require devices that prevent vehicles from being started by an intoxicated driver.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - After being pushed for years by advocates, legislation to require some first-time drunk drivers in Pennsylvania to use ignition-interlock devices is inching toward becoming law. The House on Monday voted, 193-2, to approve a bill that would force the use of ignition interlocks by first-time offenders whose blood-alcohol concentration was at least 0.10 percent. After returning to the Senate, which unanimously approved an earlier version, the bill would head to Gov. Wolf, who supports it, according to a spokesman.
NEWS
March 26, 2016
Two pit bulls missing for about a week were found Friday after a tip led rescue officials to an abandoned building where the dogs were being held, likely to be trained for dogfighting. On Friday, Justice Rescue reunited the pit bulls with their owner, who had been looking for them since they got away a week earlier. Justice Rescue officers got a call last week about dogs locked in an abandoned building in Chester. The group said it gets many calls about dog fighting in the area and had rescued dogs from that building before.
NEWS
February 18, 2016
A man wanted in an attempted-murder case in Wildwood was arrested Tuesday in Egg Harbor Township, Atlantic County, after a police chase during which two schools were placed on lockdown. About 7:45 a.m., Egg Harbor police responded to a domestic incident on Glenn Avenue. A woman told them that her ex-boyfriend, Hakim Clark, 25, of Atlantic City, broke her vehicle's windshield, made threats against her, and fled on foot. Before Clark was found by cops about an hour and a half later, the Joy Miller Elementary School and Alder Avenue Middle School were put on lockdown.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
More than 15 million years ago, the delicate flowers fell to the floor of a muggy, tropical forest, and somehow did not rot and wither away. Instead, they were trapped in sticky globs of tree resin, hardened into amber, and carried on the high seas to what is now a Caribbean mountain range. The first Lena Struwe heard of all this was last April at Rutgers University, when she opened an email depicting the fragile petals trapped in golden splendor. On Monday, the botanist and her collaborator, Oregon State University's George O. Poinar Jr., who found the two amber fossils, announced that the plants they contained represented a new species, Strychnos electri . For Agatha Christie fans, this is a distant cousin of the plant that contains the poison substance strychnine.
NEWS
February 15, 2016 | By Edith Newhall, FOR THE INQUIRER
O f the artists who composed the Pictures Generation - Cindy Sherman, Richard Prince, Barbara Kruger, Sherrie Levine, David Salle, and others who appropriated images from various sources in their art - Matt Mullican, born in Los Angeles in 1951 to artist parents, and a student of John Baldessari at the California Institute of the Arts, always seemed to be off in his own world. He sort of was, it turned out. Looking at Mullican's mid-1970s pictographs of everyday signs (say, the isolated male figure indicating the men's room, or the lighted cigarette with the diagonal line crossing it)
SPORTS
February 4, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, Staff Writer
The roller coaster that is the Penn State recruiting process for the Class of 2016 swung upward on Tuesday, when the Nittany Lions received a pair of oral commitments from two players, one a 305-pound junior college transfer who will shore up the defensive tackle position. The Lions, who have picked up commitments from four players in the last three days to reverse some recent negative momentum, enter Wednesday's national signing day hoping to hold on to at least two of the players who committed to them last summer, and perhaps pick up one or two more from those announcing their college decisions.
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