CollectionsLocomotive
IN THE NEWS

Locomotive

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 43-year-old locomotive that once hauled coal to Exelon's Cromby Generating Station in Phoenixville is getting a new life. Exelon Power is donating Locomotive 7706, a GP38 model with a 16-cylinder 2,000-horsepower diesel engine valued at $140,000, to the West Chester Railroad, a nonprofit that preserves and operates vintage trains in Chester County. Exelon had used the former Conrail locomotive since the 1990s to pull coal hoppers to the power plant, which was retired at the end of 2011 and is undergoing decommissioning.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1988 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
They like to call the sprawling locomotive works on the east side of town the Factory of the Future, but Building 10 - the cavernous main assembly building - was built in 1912 and looks like it. The floors are still paved with durable wooden blocks. Men behind steel masks still crouch with their welding torches on the massive locomotive frames lined up like battleships on the shop floor. A 200-ton crane shuttles overhead, occasionally lifting one of the hulks to another station.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Ed Sholl's garage on Willow Street in Bordentown City stands an exquisite 14-foot replica of a railroad locomotive, a three-ton testament to the majesty of metal in the hands of a craftsman. If archaeologists were to come upon it a thousand years from now, they would be awed by the precision of his one-sixth scale steam engine - and bewildered as to why it was made. Sholl is a little bemused himself these days after spending more than 25,000 hours and 15 years creating this exact replica of the engine that pulled the Pennsylvania Railroad's crack Nelly Bly Limited.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About a half-century ago, on a spring afternoon, a New York railway executive struck a gentleman's deal with a St. Louis railroad physician that would reverberate many years after their telephone conversation ended. The doctor succeeded in acquiring a rare camelback locomotive that once hauled people through the rugged hills and mountains of northern New Jersey and Pennsylvania, its engine whistling and smokestack belching white clouds of steam. And since 1953, engine No. 952 has rested on tracks behind the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, subjected to years of rain and snow as weeds wrapped around the dormant steel wheels.
NEWS
June 17, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A series of Main Line fires - including a serious house blaze - caused by a malfunctioning Amtrak locomotive has alarmed Lower Merion residents who live near the busy tracks. And they're worried about Amtrak's response to the April fires. Amtrak dispatchers initially refused firefighters' requests to halt the malfunctioning train or to stop other trains to give firefighters better access to battle the fires, Lower Merion Fire Chief Charles McGarvey said. "I'm certain it probably will happen again," said Caroline Cuthbert, who lives on Hathaway Lane in Wynnewood, where one house was seriously damaged and other homeowners lost fences and trees to the rapidly spreading flames.
SPORTS
October 6, 1992 | By Dave Caldwell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Want another Herschel Walker story to tell your grandchildren? How about this: Now you can say you saw this guy run right out of his shoes. OK, so maybe it was only one shoe. And maybe a defender pulled it off. But his 9-yard touchdown burst and 61 second-half rushing yards helped the Eagles gain their biggest victory of the young season - the 31-7 plastering of the previously undefeated Dallas Cowboys. He finished the game with 86 yards and two touchdowns on 19 carries.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | Inquirer photographs by Andy Nelson
The wedding was a joint idea, but the location was the groom's inspiration, the groom being Ed Cevasco, a railroad engineer and president of the New Hope & Ivyland Railroad. Cevasco and Lynn Taylor were married aboard a company locomotive yesterday in New Hope and took off afterward on a trip with the groom at the throttle of the train. After the ceremony, the couple (above) stepped down briefly from the balcony of the locomotive cab to greet guests and receive congratulations. Beforehand (right)
NEWS
December 12, 2003 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
Royal Mail next month will issue six special stamps recalling the birth and evolution of the steam locomotive that appeared in Britain just prior to the debut of the world's first postage stamp, the Penny Black. The stamps are peculiar in format, measuring nearly 2? inches horizontally and about 1 inch vertically. The extra-wide breathing room allows the designs to include the classic engines pulling coaches amid scenic landscape and puffing smoke. Five of the six stamps, which will be issued Jan. 13, picture locomotives originally owned and operated by the Big Four rail companies: the Great Western Railway; the London, Midland and Scottish Railway; the London and North Eastern Railway, and the Southern.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along hundreds of miles of railroad tracks, mourners stood silently, reverently, as a doleful whistle and wisps of smoke and steam announced the approaching funeral train. Many wept and bowed their heads as it passed. In towns where the locomotive stopped, thousands surged forward, pushing and jostling to get a better view. Bands played melancholy tunes and preachers offered up solemn prayers. They focused on a dark maroon railcar, swathed in black crepe, carrying the martyred Abraham Lincoln, who had come on another train four years earlier to tell throngs at Independence Hall that he'd "rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender" the country.
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | By Tom Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report
A man with a two-foot-long machete and a burning desire to blow his own horn halted a northbound Amtrak passenger train just outside Baltimore for more than 90 minutes yesterday, while several hundred passengers fumed. No one was hurt, and the man, identified by an Amtrak spokesman as Reginald Leon Moore, 34, of Baltimore, eventually was subdued by railroad and city police. The spokesman, John Jacobson, said police would decide whether to file charges against Moore after he is examined at a local hospital.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 29, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA plans to spend up to $154 million for 18 new Regional Rail locomotives, the authority's biggest railroad acquisition in a decade. The electric locomotives would replace eight aging engines operating on the Lansdale-Doylestown, Paoli-Thorndale, Trenton, and Wilmington-Newark lines, and add capacity to other regional lines. The SEPTA board is expected to approve the purchase on Thursday, with the locomotives to be delivered in 2018. SEPTA is buying 13 "Cities Sprinter" ACS-64 locomotives to be built by Siemens Industry Inc., the German conglomerate, at its factory in Sacramento, Calif.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
To improve safety, Amtrak will install video cameras to monitor the actions of engineers in locomotive cabs, Amtrak chief executive Joseph Boardman said Tuesday. The use of such cameras has beenurgedfor five years by the National Transportation Safety Board and opposed by the engineers' union. The cameras will allow managers and accident investigators to review engineers' actions. Similar cameras, facing outward from the front of the locomotives, already are in place. The action is the second major safety move by Amtrak after the May 12 derailment of Train 188 at Frankford Junction in Philadelphia killed eight people and injured about 200 passengers.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along hundreds of miles of railroad tracks, mourners stood silently, reverently, as a doleful whistle and wisps of smoke and steam announced the approaching funeral train. Many wept and bowed their heads as it passed. In towns where the locomotive stopped, thousands surged forward, pushing and jostling to get a better view. Bands played melancholy tunes and preachers offered up solemn prayers. They focused on a dark maroon railcar, swathed in black crepe, carrying the martyred Abraham Lincoln, who had come on another train four years earlier to tell throngs at Independence Hall that he'd "rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender" the country.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vice President Biden used a trip to 30th Street Station on Thursday to tout Amtrak's newest locomotive as an engine of the economy and a savior of middle-class jobs. The first of 70 new electric locomotives will begin revenue service Friday in Boston, pulling Amtrak coaches on the Northeast Corridor. Amtrak is spending $466 million on the new 125-m.p.h. locomotives, being built by the rail systems division of Siemens Industry Inc. in Sacramento, Calif. The new "Cities Sprinter" locomotives will replace models that are 25 to 35 years old. They eventually will power all Northeast Regional trains between Boston and Washington, and also will operate on the Keystone Corridor between Harrisburg, Philadelphia and New York.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
VICE PRESIDENT Joe Biden, a self-confessed railroad geek, strode to the podium at 30th Street Station yesterday to sing the praises of Amtrak's smart new electric locomotive - and quickly noticed that U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, Philly's Democratic Party chairman, was missing. "I don't know where the hell Brady is," Biden told the crowd in mock shock-and-awe. "Tell him I marked him 'absent.' " Then Biden, who U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx introduced as "president of the Amtrak fan club," launched into a riding-the-rails rap with the fervor of a man who made 7,000 round-trips between Washington and his Wilmington home during his 36 years in the Senate.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2012
In the Region Suture monopoly alleged Drug distributor Cardinal Health Inc. and medical products distributor Owens & Minor Inc. were sued by a Pottsville, Pa., health system for allegedly monopolizing the sutures market. The companies' dominance in the U.S. markets for sutures and endomechanical products led to artificially inflated prices, lawyers for Schuylkill Health System said in the complaint, filed in federal court in Philadelphia. Schuylkill Health, which operates two hospitals, is seeking to represent all direct purchasers of sutures and endo products.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 43-year-old locomotive that once hauled coal to Exelon's Cromby Generating Station in Phoenixville is getting a new life. Exelon Power is donating Locomotive 7706, a GP38 model with a 16-cylinder 2,000-horsepower diesel engine valued at $140,000, to the West Chester Railroad, a nonprofit that preserves and operates vintage trains in Chester County. Exelon had used the former Conrail locomotive since the 1990s to pull coal hoppers to the power plant, which was retired at the end of 2011 and is undergoing decommissioning.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades ago, the trains used to stop at the quaint brick railroad station in Pemberton, then chug away again to Fort Dix and other towns on the way to Hightstown. But two historic locomotives and 10 rail cars now at the station aren't going anywhere, if the Pemberton Township Historic Trust has its way - even though a judge has ordered their removal. The nonprofit trust, which opened the station as a museum in 1999, was told Friday by Superior Court Judge Karen Suter to find a new location for the cars within 60 days.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
When we were growing up as teens in the 1970's, Saturday mornings filled my sister and me with funky anticipation. We'd race downstairs, flip on the Magnavox, and settle in to experience "the hippest trip in America" - Soul Train . See, Soul Train wasn't just any television dance show. Soul Train belonged to us. Soul Train showcased our R&B music, our artists, our dances, heck, even our black hair-care products. It was our cultural touchstone at a time when we were learning that, yes, black was beautiful - even if we weren't quite sure if we believed it yet. But Don Cornelius, Soul Train's pinstripe-suited, haystack-afro'ed, deep silken-voiced creator and host, affirmed it for us. That's why it's so ironically sad that news yesterday of Cornelius' death at 75, from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound at his home outside of Los Angeles, came on the first day of Black History Month.
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By David Singleton, SCRANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE
SCRANTON - Like the other students attending RailCamp 2011 this week at Steamtown National Historic Site, Mitchell Smithbauer hopes to come away with a better understanding and appreciation of railroading past and present. Unlike most of his fellow campers, however, he arrived with some hands-on, real-world experience - his family operates Bucksgahuda & Western Railroad Co., a two-foot-gauge railroad at St. Marys founded by his grandfather, Bill Bauer, and three of his brothers. "I already know a lot of the stuff that people are talking about," Mitchell, 14, said Tuesday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|