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Log Cabin

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NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
The mayor of Woodlynne and her councilman-husband are battling with the president of a group of Scout leaders over a log cabin that had been used by scouts in the tiny borough for the last 50 years. George W. Hesser Jr., president of the Cabin Board of Trustees, is fighting a decision by Woodlynne Mayor Ethel Schiavo and the Borough Council that effectively took control of the cabin away from Hesser. The borough government decided in July not to continue leasing the cabin to the board after the lease expired at the end of last month, Schiavo said.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry and Doris Rink open their Gibbstown home - which includes the oldest log cabin in North America - to tourists any time they are home. Once, a British woman stopped in after midnight, and she got a tour, Harry Rink says. Yesterday, the Rinks had 200 more visitors (they get 2,000 to 5,000 a year) when, in a mixing of cultures, Lithuanian-Americans held a celebration in the little cabin built around 1640 by Finnish woodsmen during the Swedish settlement of New Jersey. It was the fifth year that the Rinks, whose heritage is German, have hosted a December cultural celebration, an event sponsored by the Greenwich Township Cultural and Heritage Committee.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mystery of the origin of the Upper Darby Swedish log cabin deepened last week. The architect the township hired to restore the landmark building, believed to have been built in 1654 by Swedish settlers, carried the latest twist - in three brown crumpled grocery bags - to a meeting with township officials Wednesday night. Warren P. Eck of West Chester said he had been on the job a few days when he began finding these troubling clues. Then he opened the bags and pulled them out: Old nails.
NEWS
July 27, 1986 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
The meeting was called "Medford Lakes - Our Past is Our Future. " But it easily could have been dubbed a log-cabin owners' convention. Dick and Rita Stevenson, who have owned their log home in the borough for six years, were there. So was Jon Rodman, a borough resident for nine years who took his 15-month-old son, Danny, along. In fact, a standing-room-only crowd of about 100 log-cabin owners turned out Wednesday night at Oaks Hall to find out just how much the proposed Medford Lakes Historic District Ordinance will control what they can and cannot do to their homes.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Except for the night that the cops cornered a car thief hiding inside an 18th century privy near their log cabin, Shellie and Courtney Freeman have lived a blissfully bucolic life in the middle of the city. It's a rent-free pocket paradise filled with towering shade trees, birds, barking dogs, raccoons, rabbits and history. The Freemans live on the grounds of Stenton Mansion, one of Philadelphia's oldest and most impressive colonial manors. "It's so neat. It's great," says Freeman, a jolly 6-foot-7 giant who is constantly banging his noggin on the 6-foot-2 ceilings in the bedroom of his 200-year-old log cabin.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
The campaign for two Borough Council seats in Woodlynne has been inflamed by a battle between an independent candidate and the borough mayor and her councilman husband, who is seeking a second term. The focus of the fight between independent Democratic candidate George W. Hesser Jr. and Democratic Mayor Ethel Schiavo and her husband, Anthony S. Schiavo, has been control of a log cabin used by scouts in the borough for the last 50 years. The fight has become a political and personal battle among the three, with Hesser and the mayor involved in shouting matches at several council meetings.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Kay Raftery, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
For almost 200 years, the Van Leer log cabin on the grounds of Conestoga High School in Berwyn has stood against time. Once a pioneer outpost, it is now only a hint of what things must have been like when Tredyffrin was on the frontier of America. The cabin that sheltered rustic farmers now is itself protected from the onslaught of students by a modern chain-link fence. It is named for the Van Leer family that emigrated to the New World in 1697, and is believed to have been built in 1800 because machine-made nails were used throughout.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Medford Lakes Borough has passed a measure aimed at preserving the rustic charm of the log cabins built several decades ago, when the community was a resort town. The borough council unanimously adopted the Medford Lakes Historic District Ordinance at its meeting Thursday night, establishing a historic district and creating a historic-preservation commission charged with administering and reviewing construction applications and maintaining design standards within the district. More than 30 people attended the public hearing, during which few residents voiced opposition to the measure establishing the district.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
If Medford Lakes residents Carolyn and Bill Hard have their way, a landmark in this former summer resort community will get a new lease on life. The Hards, who publish the Hard Report, a weekly trade magazine for rock radio stations, are asking the borough's zoning board to grant them a use variance to convert Big Timbers from a privately owned home facing Lower Aetna Lake into a location for their business. Big Timbers is one of the largest log homes in the community and was one of the first homes constructed by developer Leon Todd in the 1920s.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After five years of talking about Oaks Hall, the deteriorating log-cabin municipal building, inspector Thomas R. Heck yesterday put his foot down. Yellow "Danger" signs now hang on locked doors. Two full-time administrators and a dozen part-timers were sent home, while Borough Manager Paul E. Thomas Jr. worked all day in the nearby public works building, mainly fielding questions about the building's condemnation. Thomas said he hoped municipal employees could reinforce the building this weekend so it could reopen on Monday.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hillshire Brands has agreed to pay $4.2 billion for Pinnacle Foods Inc., which started in 2001 when a Dallas private equity firm bought Campbell Soup Co. castoffs Vlasic pickles and Swanson frozen dinners out of another company's bankruptcy, the firms said Monday. With the acquisition of Pinnacle, which in subsequent deals expanded its product line to include Birds Eye frozen vegetables and Duncan Hines cake mixes, Chicago-based Hillshire is pushing further outside the deli case.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
ABINGTON Before it was hemmed in by stores, offices, hospitals, and homes, Abington Presbyterian Church stood apart in the Montgomery County landscape, a Romanesque sanctuary "whose steeple, crowning the hills, can be seen afar for many miles," as a pastor wrote in 1889. For 70 years before the current church was built, the church occupied a simpler stone meetinghouse. And for 70 years before that, congregants worshipped in a modest log cabin nestled beneath a tree on a corner of the reverend's farm.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN Cole Porter wrote "Let's Do It" about the myriad number of creatures who mate ( "The most refined lady bugs do it/When a gentleman calls/Moths in your rugs they do it/What's the use of moth balls" ), one species that didn't make the list was the Galapagos tortoise. Galapagos tortoises are the largest in the world and can live for more than 150 years. But they've struggled to fend off predators and are now under threat. In part, because, although there are horned tortoises, the Galapagos are not horny tortoises.
REAL_ESTATE
October 28, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When he was 20 years old, single, and the beneficiary of a small inheritance, Adam Berr purchased a vintage 1939 log cabin in Medford. Its condition was not pristine, and, at 870 square feet, the cabin was hardly commodious. Today, Berr, 33, is a specialist in computer adaptation for the handicapped, married since 2007, and a father. And his bachelor log cabin has grown up, too. It's been expanded, improved, and transformed into a better version of itself, since Berr and his wife were determined to hang onto the cabin's log roots while expanding its livability.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
By Brian Palmer Fox News analyst Brit Hume dubbed it the "destitution derby. " At the Democratic National Convention this week, Michelle Obama talked about her husband's rusty car and worn-out shoes. Keynote speaker Julián Castro mentioned his orphaned grandmother, who dropped out of school to help her family. Republicans offered the same themes last week. Sen. Marco Rubio said his immigrant mother worked as a maid and stock clerk. Ann Romney waxed nostalgic about the days when she and Mitt lived in a basement apartment and subsisted on pasta and tuna fish.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
By David Holahan When I was a child, my family shared an aluminum extension ladder with the Harmon clan and another neighbor in Long Island. Sometimes finding it was a kind of shell game: Which garage, shed, or porch is the ladder under now? The money saved by not buying our own ladders couldn't have been much, but the Harmons had 10 kids, and I had four brothers, so every little bit helped. And how often did any of us need a ladder? The boundary between us and the Harmons was vague.
NEWS
October 16, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
A LONE LOG CABIN sits at the end of Joe Mason Road in Cape May County, just before the road fades into sand and twists off into miles of dark cedars and pines. John "Jack" Schlump used to live in the cabin on that quiet, secluded road in Belleplain. Family members said the avid hunter felt at home in the vast forest beyond his old front porch. But his then-wife and one of his stepsons, who shared the home with him but were on the outs with him, said recently that things weren't always quiet when Schlump was around, particularly the last time.
NEWS
August 15, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first surprise came in February, as they inspected the stucco on a Haddonfield house before repainting it. They removed pieces around the windows and discovered beautifully preserved red brick. Over the next few months, Mark Welsh and his son Ted knocked off 10 tons of stucco, revealing a side of a historic house that hadn't been seen for centuries. Out of its shell emerged the stately home of Thomas Redman, a prominent Quaker businessman who settled in town in the 1730s and owned a portion of the colonial-era building that houses the Indian King Tavern.
LIVING
February 22, 2008 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
April and Bryan Zilai were looking for something different in a home, something truly original. They found it in an authentic log cabin in Rancocas Woods, an enclave of about 50 homes in Mount Laurel whose wooded trails and distinctive dwellings seem straight out of a storybook. Still, a few homes on these winding streets have broken the mold and no longer look anything like the log cabins they started out as in the late 1930s. In fact, turning a corner in this neighborhood occasionally yields a big surprise.
NEWS
March 25, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
They carefully maneuvered through often too-narrow doors and into the lower level of the Franklin Institute yesterday morning, dodging occasional raindrops that could turn their model houses' marshmallow bricks to mush or cause paint to trickle down cardboard walls. This seemingly endless procession of more than 500 fifth graders from public and private schools on both sides of the Delaware was not to honor King Tut, whose treasures temporarily fill the science museum's upper floors.
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