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Log House

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NEWS
December 13, 1987 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
After three centuries in one place, Downingtown's historic - and neglected - log house is about to be moved and renovated. On Wednesday night, the Borough Council gave final approval to the local Historical Society to proceed with plans to move and restore the landmark building. For Francis Brown, a lifelong resident of Downingtown who has worked for more than a decade to save the structure, the action came as a triumph. "I can remember even my parents saying this house is the most important thing Downingtown has, and that was a long time ago," said Brown, who is 70. "We really can view it as one of the truly priceless houses in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Downingtown Borough Council is mending fences over a disputed $35,000 pledge for restoration of its historic Log House. During the council's work session Wednesday, the group held a generally favorable discussion of a compromise proposed in a Tuesday memo by Council President William J. Whiteman. In the plan, the borough would hold the project's cost to $140,000, limit its own contribution to $35,000 and actively raise funds to lessen that contribution. Any money pledged by the council would come from a 20-year loan, not from the borough surplus.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Preservation and protection were the main themes at a work session Wednesday of the Downingtown Borough Council, which discussed an ordinance controlling underground storage tanks and the completion of the historic Log House project. Leonard Sideman, president of the Downingtown Historical Society, told the council that project architect Robert L. DeSilets has determined it will cost $55,925 to complete the renovation of the Log House, the oldest standing structure in the borough, and possibly all of Chester County.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of negotiations, words about relocating Downingtown's historic Log House finally have been replaced with work crews. Two weeks ago, borough officials and members of historical societies met to break ground on the foundation for the building, about 50 feet away from the present location. And last week, a crew of workers from Newark, Del., began preparing the site for a move that could be completed by the end of the month. The Log House, which was built around 1700 and is considered one of the oldest houses in the state, has for years been subject to the destructive force of traffic along Lancaster Avenue.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | By Catherine Quillman, Special to The Inquirer
During her 22 years as a Philadelphia Police officer with the Juvenile Aid Division, Martha Brown of East Marlborough Township says, she learned to face the facts, to obtain the "who, what, where and when" of every story. Now Brown, 60, is retired and has a problem she's not sure she can solve: She wants to save a log house on her property. To do so, however, she must break a legal agreement she made with the township in February 1989. Brown grew up in the house but said she didn't realize that the house had historic value until a few months ago, when she hired a contractor to begin dismantling the structure, in compliance with the township agreement, by removing layers of old siding.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
The restoration of the oldest standing structure in Downingtown - and possibly all of Chester County - should be finished by the end of the year. At a work session Wednesday night, the Downingtown Borough Council heard a progress report on the Log House, which was built in 1701 and is believed to be one of the oldest standing structures in the state. Deterioration over the years and botched restoration efforts led to a coordinated push by the Downingtown Historical Society and the Borough Council to raise money for the restoration.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Michael Rinker, Special to The Inquirer
The Downingtown Borough Council has tentatively approved additional funds to complete restoration of the historic Log House. The council agreed at a work session Wednesday to provide $28,335 to complete the project after representatives from 18th Century Restoration of East Nantmeal said that unforeseen problems had pushed the total cost beyond the original estimate. The council will vote on final approval at its public meeting on Feb. 7. The Log House, built in 1701, is believed to be one of the oldest standing structures in the state.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
Work on Downingtown's historic Log House - which has been on hold since the house was moved last spring - is scheduled to begin in earnest this fall. Four bids for restoration of the house are now being reviewed by the Downingtown Historical Society, and an archaeological dig near the 18th- century house in Kerr Park will begin Saturday. "After a bit of a hiatus since the house was moved some months ago, we're ready to complete the project," said Leonard Sideman, president of the Historical Society.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dispute between the Downingtown Borough Council and the Historical Society that could have left the Log House restoration project underfunded apparently will be resolved when the society releases a financial statement, Leonard Sideman, the president of the society, said Wednesday. "We're not interested in bickering (about) this question of money," Sideman said. "It is the society's intention and desire that this project actually get accomplished. " The dispute began two weeks ago, after the society asked the council to turn over more than $8,000 in profits from the sale of the book The History of Downingtown, published in 1982.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a spirited debate on spending - and before a walkout by the mayor - the Downingtown Borough Council has pledged $35,000 to help restore the borough's historic Log House. The vote at the meeting Wednesday night was 5-1, with only Councilwoman Denise DiEuliis arguing that the borough should not set aside extra money for the long-awaited restoration, which has risen in cost from $100,000 to $140,000. The borough has agreed to pay the rest of the project's cost if the Downingtown Historic Society fails to raise more money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to build a megachurch in Hatfield Township that prompted a public outcry now may have something that seemed implausible 10 months ago - neighborhood support. A revised plan, born of months of meetings, coffee chats, and site visits by Hatfield officials, church leaders, and residents, elicited cautious signs of approval from residents attending a township meeting Wednesday night. "Thank you for working so hard. I am happy about some of the ideas," said Cindy Bourgeois, a resident of the Montgomery County town, who had collected 1,000 signatures opposing a zoning change that Montgomeryville's Keystone Fellowship church would need to build.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Ula Ilnytzky, Associated Press
PARSIPPANY, N.J. - A unique costume exhibit in New Jersey offers visitors an up-close experience of what it might have been like to be female and live in an upper-middle-class household at the turn of the 20th century. The house, in this case, is the former estate of Gustav Stickley, a major figure in the American Arts and Crafts movement. It's now the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms in Parsippany. The exhibit, "Styling an American Family," running through Jan. 6, features 32 female and two male mannequins arranged in groupings throughout the two-story log house depicting happy and celebratory vignettes: a wedding, a party, playing games, readying for a tennis match, packing trunks for a trip, trying on dresses after shopping.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Kathleen Lynn and THE RECORD (Hackensack
HACKENSACK, N.J. — Tony DiOrio wanted a rustic home, but his heart sank when his real estate agent drove him up to a West Milford, N.J., log house in 1999. "It was not really what I was thinking of," DiOrio recalled. "The whole thing was slathered with this obnoxious brown paint. " But something clicked when he stepped inside. "I knew I was home," he said. "I could see where all my furniture went. " In the years since he bought the home, DiOrio has extensively renovated the property, figuring out how to do a lot of the work himself because he couldn't always afford to hire contractors.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hal Taussig wears baggy jeans and fraying work shirts that Goodwill might reject. His shoes have been resoled three times. He bought his one suit from a thrift shop for $14. At age 81, he doesn't own a car. He performs errands and commutes to the office by bicycle. He lives on the outskirts of Media in a narrow wood-frame house that was built for mill and factory workers. And he has given away millions. Given the fortune that Taussig has made through Untours, his unique travel business, and has given away through the Untours Foundation, you could call him the Un-millionaire.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What we like: This house, in Kulpsville, is a meticulously restored example of an early colonial German log house, with 90 percent of its original design retained. It is on the National Register of Historic Places. Special features: The house has its original center-hall fireplace and pegged roof trusses, as well as bead-board partitions, doors and floors that date to its 1695 construction. A pent roof, a kind of overhang, was re-created on three sides of the house where the first floor meets the second.
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Downingtown, whose colonial-era grist mills fed George Washington's army, will host a gathering of Revolutionary War reenactors on Saturday. A similar Downingtown Patriots Day in 2002 drew about 1,000 people to the borough's Kerr Park, said Glenn A. Usher, chairman of the Downingtown Historical and Park Commission, the day's organizer. While Downingtown, on the East Branch of the Brandywine Creek, was not a scene of fighting during the Revolution, its strategic location during the days of the nearby Battle of Brandywine, the subsequent Paoli Massacre, and the fall of Philadelphia into British hands in September 1777 warranted a hasty deployment of defensive battlements then - and a fine excuse for a party in 2005, Usher said.
NEWS
October 5, 2003 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For New Jersey history buffs, here's a question: Name the state's two governors. Gov. McGreevey is the easier answer, but the other may be difficult - unless you know that the first colonists in this region weren't the English but the Swedes and a few Finns. The other is Ron Hendrickson, 49, of Moorestown, the newly elected governor of the Swedish Colonial Society and a great - make that 10 greats - grandson of Johan Hendriksson who arrived in Wilmington in 1654, a good 28 years before William Penn came to check out his holdings.
REAL_ESTATE
May 11, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
It didn't take Jim and Gwen Klein long to figure out that the 1741 stone farmhouse they bought 23 years ago in northern Chester County was too small. They had chosen the house, which sits on 26 acres, because, when you come down to it, real estate is all about location. Unlike comparable places they had looked at, it was well off the road in the center of the property, so the noises of civilization were far away. The location also was "mutually inconvenient," Gwen Klein said: about halfway between Jim Klein's job as a banker in Berks County and hers as an interior designer in the Lehigh Valley and Philadelphia suburbs.
REAL_ESTATE
September 8, 2002 | By Kate Campbell FOR THE INQUIRER
Thick clouds hung low over the historic Morgan Log House, bringing sweet promise of relief from the drought. Still, raindrops menaced the roofing crew hammering atop the two-story Montgomery County dwelling that once was home to Daniel Boone's grandparents. Their ministrations to the 1700s-vintage structure's partially rotting roof was the final piece of a painstaking makeover that included four years of fund-raising and research on construction methods and materials used in the 18th century.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Back in the days when the crime of stealing chickens or even a horse could land you in prison for up to 18 years, a gang of six brothers pillaged farms in Chester and Lancaster Counties, doing just that. Their family name was Buzzard, and although they often raided henhouses, few reporters in the 1880s saw any humor in the name. They were the Johnston brothers of their day, only they were on horseback and carried hunting rifles. Newspaper accounts of the brothers' activities from 1861 to 1884 speak in the tones of an old Western novel, using words such as "posse" "ambush" and "desperado.
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