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Logic

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NEWS
May 31, 2002
JUDGE FRANCIS Cosgrove doesn't do explanations. So we can't unbraid the twisted logic in his refusal to hold former Police Captains James J. Brady and Joseph J. DiLacqua for trial. What a shame. You might want to try the same logic next time you get hauled into traffic court. Two rookie police officers who arrived on the scene moments after an apparently drunk Brady ran his city car into a pole told Cosgrove DiLacqua ordered them to submit false reports and to alter the scene to make it appear Brady had been forced off the road.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
ICAN'T believe that anyone would write a letter to the Daily News to defend Abu Abbas, the mass murderer and terrorist who plotted so many innocent deaths - but here comes a Mr. Eric Hammell, who writes that Abbas is innocent of the murder of Leon Klinghoffer because he was on shore and not on the boat when it happened. To say that Abbas told the hijackers on board not to hurt anyone is a blatant lie, and distortion of the facts, and Mr. Hammell should be ashamed of himself to write such a letter.
NEWS
September 25, 1986
Since the administration and Congress have made available $100 million in aid to the so-called freedom fighters in Nicaragua, would it not be appropriate to give a comparable sum (in relative terms, perhaps $500 million) to the "freedom fighters" in South Africa? Or, to reverse the situation, if "constructive engagement" is satisfactory in South Africa, would it not also be appropriate in Nicaragua instead of killing, maiming and impoverishing much further an already impoverished population?
NEWS
May 22, 1999
What sane, logical reason can any person give for the possession of an assault weapon, which sprays bullets instead of firing them one at a time? Such weapons should be outlawed, with the exception of the military, and possibly the SWAT teams of the police departments. There should be very severe fines and jail terms for anyone who possesses one of these very lethal weapons. There is no sense at all to any individual possessing one. Milton Shapiro Philadelphia Have an opinion on the news or issues of the day?
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
A longshoreman was charged by a federal grand jury yesterday in the theft last year of nine logic analyzers from the Philadelphia waterfront. What's a logic analyzer? That's what the thieves wanted to know. One of them had the nerve to call the owner of the pieces to ask, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Carlos A. Martir Jr., who announced the charges against James Roberson, 34, of 33rd Street near Lehigh Avenue. It was not clear whether the phone call led to Roberson's arrest.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
I NEED someone to explain something to me. If your grandmother or other relative was brutally murdered like Marie Lindgren, how could you not want the death penalty for the low-lifes who did it? I don't want the perpetrators to be able to watch cable, get educated, spend my hard-earned tax dollars and eventually come out into the world again. They took a human life and - in my eyes - they would do it again! I say give the death penalty without any appeals! Silvia Puglia-Velykis Philadelphia
SPORTS
October 5, 1988 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
One team had the best record in baseball (104-58), was never more than a half-game out of first place all season and stampeded down the stretch to go 20-7 after Sept. 2. The other team was nine games out of first at the all-star break, won fewer games (89) than any full-season American League East champion in history and stumbled through a final two weeks (nine losses in its final 13 games, six in its final seven games) that made the '64 Phillies look almost respectable. So if you were laying the odds on an American League playoff series between these two teams, whom would you favor?
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By Richard Cohen
A recent White House "issues lunch" reportedly went this way: The report of the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography came up. Patrick J. Buchanan, the White House director of communications, had what is for him a modest proposal - ban the sale of Penthouse and Playboy from military bases. There was a pause until someone said, "Well, that would certainly do wonders for our recruiting program," at which point everyone, President Reagan included, laughed. Next item, please. The anecdote is instructive.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | by Monsignor S.J. Adamo
Some years ago I was talking to a journalist friend of mine and it was around Easter time. Nonchalantly, I said I was overjoyed with the hope of rising from death some day and living again. What a great day it would be, I opined, to rise to a new life and be immortal. My friend thought for a while and then said, "I don't think I'd care to come back to life here; once was enough. " I was shocked into silence because I had always assumed that everyone would rejoice to rise from the dead.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | BY JACK KIRKWOOD
"Out with logic, on with lunacy" was the OWL Party of Oregon's campaign slogan a dozen years ago when it fielded a full state of statewide candidates. OWL platform planks included proposals like liquidizing the state's assets so taxpayers could see what they would look like in cash. This crowd made Lyndon LaRouche's bunch appear reasonable by comparison. Given recent international, national, regional and local events, the OWL Party could resurface and do quite well. The MOVE grand jury must have had several OWL adherents on it. How else do you explain their inane conclusions?
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SPORTS
February 26, 2015 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - I am going to double back on something I wrote yesterday, and because there are still 37 days left in spring training, I'm not going to feel bad about it. Words will be written on other topics. For now, though, let's look at an issue that several people raised via Twitter and email yesterday with regard to the Red Sox' signing of Cuban infield prospect Yoan Moncada. As I mentioned in the column, one of the mitigating factors that clubs had to consider before signing Moncada was the accompanying forfeiture of the right to sign any international players for more than $300,000 for 2 years.
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
MARC LAMONT HILL, the CNN political commentator and African-American studies professor, told an audience at Mother Bethel AME Church yesterday that there's an upside to the protests and looting that broke out in Ferguson, Mo., following the death of Michael Brown in August. It shined a national spotlight not just on police behavior in the St. Louis suburb, said the Philly native, but on the larger problem of cops around the country who see black people as "disposable. " "If they hadn't looted and burned down half of Ferguson, we wouldn't even be talking about Michael Brown right now. Ferguson is a story because of what they did," Hill said at the historic Society Hill church, referring to residents who were outraged by Brown's death at the hands of Officer Darren Wilson.
SPORTS
July 22, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
NOT EVERYONE can be Derek Jeter. Chipper Jones won his only world championship as a rookie. Cal Ripken Jr. was in his second season when the Orioles beat the Phillies to win his only World Series in 1983. Tony Gwynn reached the World Series twice, in 1984 and 1998, when his San Diego Padres were beaten in five games by Detroit and swept by the Yankees, respectively. Now in his 11th season with the Mets, his career batting average an even .300, David Wright has played in the postseason just once, when the Mets lost to the Cardinals in a seven-game National League Championship Series, in 2006.
REAL_ESTATE
May 11, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
She's already completed a half-dozen real estate development projects, and Sheila Dragon is just getting started. "Nicole Curtis, watch out!" Dragon said, referring to her television inspiration, the host of the DIY Network reality show Rehab Addict , who rescues historic houses. Dragon is one of a small but growing number of female developers in the Philadelphia area. Working for many years as a home stager through her West Chester-based company Dragon Design, she realized she was increasingly overseeing renovations and architects, completing the sales process from start to finish but not being paid for the end result.
NEWS
September 17, 2013
IT'S HARD to believe, but Washington has trumped Harrisburg when it comes to bipartisan action on a serious problem. Pennsylvania's own Sen. Robert Casey somehow convinced Democrats and Republicans in Congress to put down their weapons and act together. It didn't get many headlines, but Congress voted last year to direct 15 percent of federal highway money to pay for repairs to "structurally deficient" bridges, a bureaucratic name for a frightening problem if there ever was one. This year Casey and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., are asking Congress to direct 25 percent of the federal money that goes to the states for bridge repair.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Father Frank Pavone
Kermit Gosnell has been accused of "snipping" the spinal cords of babies born alive in his Philadelphia abortion clinic. Is such behavior crazy, or does it simply follow the logic of an industry that believes the mother's choice overrides any right to protection that the baby has? Now I'm not saying Gosnell, if found guilty, shouldn't be held accountable for the eight murders he is charged with. But I am suggesting that a certain set of presumptions has been created by our public policies on abortion and the arguments made to justify these policies.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
Q: UNDER MAYOR NUTTER's Actual Value Initiative, why has the city determined that some properties are worth less (or more) than what they sold for in the last couple of years? A: Just a couple of months ago, a building at 7th and Bainbridge streets sold for $950,000. The city assessed it for tax purposes at $545,600. Several blocks away, a home on Morris Street sold for $100,000 last September. But guess what the city assessed it at? $202,700. Why is this happening? Well, there are a few potential reasons.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Jonathan Zimmerman, For The Inquirer
OK, Pennsylvanians, let's see a show of hands: How many of you were harmed by the NCAA's sanctions against Penn State in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal? Gov. Corbett says you were, so he's suing the NCAA, which slapped a $60 million fine and a four-year bowl ban on Penn State last summer. Corbett initially accepted the sanctions, but he changed his tune last week, arguing that the penalties "irreparably harm the citizens and the general economy of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
The math never made any sense to Crystal Perkins. Medicare paid more than $100,000 for her kidney transplant and for three years covered the bulk of the $2,400-a-month drug that kept her body from rejecting the organ. But then her Medicare coverage expired. For a few years she managed to keep up her medications, paying out of pocket or begging at pharmaceutical companies and hospitals. But eventually she started skipping doses, and by 2009, the kidney was failing and had to be removed.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
MY NEPHEW is a very smart 3 1/2-year-old with an unassailable sense of logic. Like most toddlers, he sees the world in a linear way, without the usual adult contortions. Here is a recent conversation I overheard between Alex and his mother: "Alex, honey, time for night-night. " "I not tired. " "C'mon, it's late and you need to go to bed. " "I want to watch SpongeBob. " "You can watch Sponge Bob in the morning. " "I want to watch him now. " "Mommy is sleepy, Alex.
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