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Lolita

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NEWS
October 2, 1998 | by David Bianculli, New York Daily News
The new cinematic version of "Lolita," rejected for two years by American film distributors as being essentially too hot to handle, has finally arrived. As a curiosity, it's worth seeing. As erotica, it's almost defiantly tame, and occasionally even laughable. As a point of comparison to Stanley Kubrick's more comic 1962 adaptation of the same Vladimir Nabokov novel, it's fairly interesting. And, ultimately, as an effective embodiment of literature's most famous nymphet and as a drama reflecting the poetic writing style that earned Nabokov's 1955 novel grudging status as art, rather than pornography, this "Lolita" is a major disappointment.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Remember Lolita, the Vladimir Nabokov novel that gave us Humbert Humbert, Clare Quilty and the term nymphet, not to mention a large amount of anguish to literary bluenoses of the time? A first edition of Lolita from the library of a prominent local collector is a highlight of Thursday's book sale at Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia. The sale, which begins at 10 a.m. in the fifth floor gallery at Freeman, 1808 Chestnut St., is one of three of note next week. The copy of Lolita was printed in 1955 by the Olympia Press of Paris, which was known for publishing Henry Miller and erotic writings of lower literary quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Vladimir Nabokov adapted his novel Lolita for the screen, which is doubtless why the Stanley Kubrick film is one of the more extraordinary literary adaptations. The film is about as faithful to its source as Humbert Humbert (James Mason) is to his wife (Shelley Winters), whom he married to be close to her daughter, Lolita (Sue Lyon), who had seduced him. Yet the film powerfully evokes the book's tragicomedy of the indifferent nymphet who slays the sexual dragon. Starring Peter Sellers as Clare Quilty, the role of his career.
FOOD
March 15, 2013
Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran had a choice: Sign a new lease at Lolita - the Mexican BYOB on 13th Street near Sansom that put them on the map nine years ago - or think about buying a spot and moving. That wouldn't be easy, as the couple also own Barbuzzo and Jamonera , plus the retail locations Grocery , Verde , and Open House , on the same block. They not only elected to sign a new 10-year lease but also to obtain a liquor license for Lolita, which should be in place by summer.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | By LINDA CHAVEZ
Has Hollywood suddenly rediscovered its conscience? After years of producing ever-escalating violent and sexually explicit films and music, some studios are now showing uncharacteristic reluctance to dish out more of the same. Two weeks ago, the Disney Co. pulled a new music release by the Detroit group Insane Clown Posse from store shelves after company executives decided they wanted no part of the raunchy lyrics the music promoted. Now, word comes that several Hollywood studios have also declined to distribute a new film version of Vladimir Nabakov's controversial novel Lolita, the story of a middle-aged professor's twisted sexual pursuit of a 12-year-old girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. . . . For years, Vladimir Nabokov's classic 1955 novel Lolita - a tragic, repugnant and heartbreaking tale of a pedophiliac love affair - had stirred the imagination of playwright Paula Vogel. Most recently an Adrian Lyne film starring Jeremy Irons and Dominique Swain, Lolita is the pseudonymous Humbert Humbert's account of his sexual obsession with his 12-year-old stepdaughter. Vogel, 46, unorthodox feminist that she is, wondered how different the story would be if Lolita were telling it. But, she recalled recently over lunch, she had no idea how to give dramatic form to this idea - until a single, cinematic image suddenly rose up before her: "I saw a woman adjust a rear view mirror, and I saw a dead relative, this man, materialize in the back seat of the car. I went, 'That's the Lolita metaphor I'm looking for: driving.
FOOD
April 25, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Ten years ago this month, Valerie Safran and Marcie Turney popped open the door of Lolita , a Mexican BYOB on 13th Street between Chestnut and Sansom. The BYOB launched their restaurant empire, all within several blocks - Barbuzzo, Jamonera, and Little Nonna's. They also own the grocery store Grocery; a gift shop, Verde; and a furnishings store, Open House. The neighborhood grew up, too, and Lolita needed a liquor license. Safran and Turney decided to renovate, as well. They closed in August.
LIVING
March 24, 2000 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"Everybody loves her," Lolita's foster mother says warmly. "She's a very good kid. She believes wholeheartedly that God will take care of her. And she always says her prayers and grace. " Lolita, 11, has a history of abuse, neglect and multiple placements, and she understandably just "shuts down" sometimes. In therapy, her sad words - "I always have to move" - are being addressed. She takes medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. She's in special-education classes on a fifth-grade level, has an average IQ, and receives extra help with reading.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Craig Welch, SEATTLE TIMES
SEATTLE - Forty years after hunters lassoed a young killer whale off Whidbey Island, Wash., and sold it to a Florida theme park, whale advocates are turning to an unusual tactic to try to force the orca's release: the Endangered Species Act. In a move legal experts said could have significant implications for other zoos and aquariums, animal-rights activists recently sued the federal government, arguing that the law may require Lolita, the killer whale...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Imagine a really good Woody Allen film, something of Annie Hall/Manhattan vintage, about literary lions and their loves. Now imagine that the central character is not the dominant wildcat but rather his pudgy, unloved cub. Relocate the setting from New York to Paris and you have the exceptional Look at Me, Agn?s Jaoui's brilliant, blistering account of the many ways fame deforms a star, his family and his fans. In the artful way it frames a house party as a tapestry of humankind (and not-so-kind)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 25, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Ten years ago this month, Valerie Safran and Marcie Turney popped open the door of Lolita , a Mexican BYOB on 13th Street between Chestnut and Sansom. The BYOB launched their restaurant empire, all within several blocks - Barbuzzo, Jamonera, and Little Nonna's. They also own the grocery store Grocery; a gift shop, Verde; and a furnishings store, Open House. The neighborhood grew up, too, and Lolita needed a liquor license. Safran and Turney decided to renovate, as well. They closed in August.
FOOD
March 15, 2013
Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran had a choice: Sign a new lease at Lolita - the Mexican BYOB on 13th Street near Sansom that put them on the map nine years ago - or think about buying a spot and moving. That wouldn't be easy, as the couple also own Barbuzzo and Jamonera , plus the retail locations Grocery , Verde , and Open House , on the same block. They not only elected to sign a new 10-year lease but also to obtain a liquor license for Lolita, which should be in place by summer.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Craig Welch, SEATTLE TIMES
SEATTLE - Forty years after hunters lassoed a young killer whale off Whidbey Island, Wash., and sold it to a Florida theme park, whale advocates are turning to an unusual tactic to try to force the orca's release: the Endangered Species Act. In a move legal experts said could have significant implications for other zoos and aquariums, animal-rights activists recently sued the federal government, arguing that the law may require Lolita, the killer whale...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011
THOSE VIOLET eyes. Those sparkling violet eyes. That's what I remember most about my lunch with Elizabeth Taylor in that hotel dining room in Puerto Vallarta. I was close enough to reach out and touch her if I dared. I didn't dare. Those violet eyes were flashing hostility. Why not? She had been through tough times with Eddie Fisher, and he was Jewish and from Philadelphia, and I was Jewish, from Philadelphia, and a writer, and if that wasn't a toxic trifecta, it sure seemed that way gazing into those violet eyes.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
Lolita Lebron, 90, a Puerto Rican independence activist who spent 25 years in prison for participating in a gun attack on the U.S. Congress a half-century ago, died Sunday in San Juan of complications from respiratory disease. Ms. Lebron was a leading figure in the small but passionate nationalist movement in the U.S. territory. In 1954, she and three other nationalists entered the U.S. Capitol with automatic pistols and opened fire from an upstairs spectators' gallery onto the crowded floor of the House, firing nearly 30 shots.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hard Candy begins with an instant-message conversation unfolding on a computer screen. This digital dialogue, we're led to believe, is between an older, perv-y guy and a teasing Lolita eager to take the relationship out of the e-realm and into the real world. And so, this icky, incoherent thriller about a sex stalker and a teen - and about revenge and humiliation - is off and running. Scripted by playwright Brian Nelson and directed by music video/commercials veteran David Slade, the film looks sharp and stylish, just like Jeff Kohlver (Patrick Wilson)
NEWS
October 26, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. . . . Is it possible I stole your name and tale from another writer? Vladimir Nabokov, so far as we know, never asked himself that question about his most notorious character. But others are asking. Sept. 15 marked the 50th anniversary of the first Paris publication of the Russian emigre's most famous novel. (In case you've been living on Mars or are 9 years old, it's about a dirty old man and a nymphet.) American publishers paid due attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Imagine a really good Woody Allen film, something of Annie Hall/Manhattan vintage, about literary lions and their loves. Now imagine that the central character is not the dominant wildcat but rather his pudgy, unloved cub. Relocate the setting from New York to Paris and you have the exceptional Look at Me, Agn?s Jaoui's brilliant, blistering account of the many ways fame deforms a star, his family and his fans. In the artful way it frames a house party as a tapestry of humankind (and not-so-kind)
LIVING
March 24, 2000 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"Everybody loves her," Lolita's foster mother says warmly. "She's a very good kid. She believes wholeheartedly that God will take care of her. And she always says her prayers and grace. " Lolita, 11, has a history of abuse, neglect and multiple placements, and she understandably just "shuts down" sometimes. In therapy, her sad words - "I always have to move" - are being addressed. She takes medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. She's in special-education classes on a fifth-grade level, has an average IQ, and receives extra help with reading.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. . . . For years, Vladimir Nabokov's classic 1955 novel Lolita - a tragic, repugnant and heartbreaking tale of a pedophiliac love affair - had stirred the imagination of playwright Paula Vogel. Most recently an Adrian Lyne film starring Jeremy Irons and Dominique Swain, Lolita is the pseudonymous Humbert Humbert's account of his sexual obsession with his 12-year-old stepdaughter. Vogel, 46, unorthodox feminist that she is, wondered how different the story would be if Lolita were telling it. But, she recalled recently over lunch, she had no idea how to give dramatic form to this idea - until a single, cinematic image suddenly rose up before her: "I saw a woman adjust a rear view mirror, and I saw a dead relative, this man, materialize in the back seat of the car. I went, 'That's the Lolita metaphor I'm looking for: driving.
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