CollectionsLollapalooza
IN THE NEWS

Lollapalooza

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Never fear, mosh-pit-crazed members of the alternative nation! The humongous traveling rock-and-roll circus known as Lollapalooza is coming back to South Philadelphia. The daylong shebang will play on Aug. 1 in the grassy fields of FDR Park, across the street from the dusty JFK Stadium site that hosted the extravaganza last year. This fourth edition of Porno For Pyro's leader Perry Farrell's high-decibel happening - the first two years skipped Philly - is headed up by main-stage attractions Smashing Pumpkins, Beastie Boys, the Breeders, George Clinton & the P-Funk All-Stars, L7, A Tribe Called Quest, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds and the Boredoms.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
To fully absorb Lollapalooza '93, fans are encouraged to roam between the festival's main stage - where eight bands are on the daylong bill - and the second stage, which features interesting lesser-known acts such as Philadelphia's The Goats. Herewith, a quick rundown of Lollapalooza artists. THE MAIN STAGE Primus. This San Francisco trio, inspired equally by Captain Beefheart and Rush, won the headlining spot, but according to Primus bassist/head weirdo Les Claypool, that's both "an honor and a chore.
NEWS
March 9, 1996 | Los Angeles Daily News
Yet again, Lollapalooza delivers the unexpected - by signing Metallica! Hard rock outfit Metallica will headline this summer's Lollapalooza caravan tour along with Soundgarden and the Ramones. "The early response to Metallica was, 'Huh? They're not alternative,' " said Lollapalooza organizer Peter Grosslight. "Lollapalooza is, and always has been, about curve balls. Having Metallica as a headliner is indeed a curve ball - very Lollapalooza. " Metallica is in the studio these days finishing an as-yet untitled album, due in stores before the tour begins in June.
NEWS
August 2, 1994 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
What is Lollapalooza? Lollapalooza is alternative rock, electric carnivals, mist tents and poetry slams. It's the Rev. Samuel Mudd's Spoken Word Revival, virtual reality rides and LSD Flight Simulators. It's a nine-hour concert with bands such as Smashing Pumpkins, the Beastie Boys, George Clinton and the P-Funk Stars and A Tribe Called Quest. Lollapalooza '94, held yesterday at FDR Park across from Veterans Stadium, may have been a soggy, rainy mess at first, but the weather didn't seem to dampen the spirits of the thousands of fans who came to have fun. They slam-danced.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until Korn slowly pedaled onstage on their low-rider bikes at the Waterfront Entertainment Centre late Saturday afternoon, the Camden amphitheater was as somber as a massive mausoleum. Lollapalooza '97 had been going on for a few hours by then, but the crowd of about 10,000 - a far cry from biggest-ever Lolla audience of 45,000, held in South Philly's FDR Park in 1994 - was listless and bored. They sat a through a lively set from the Manchester, England, quintet James as if sentenced to after-school detention.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lollapalooza founder Perry Farrell invented the '90s notion of a traveling rock-and-roll circus, complete with multiple stages and sideshow attractions. But while Farrell's far-sightedness is as obvious as the list of this summer's all-day festival is long, Lollapalooza's fortunes have fallen with alternative rock, and it's no longer the benighted jewel of the circuit. (That would be Lilith Fair, the all-femme fete that arrives in town July 27.) Still, although this year's Lolla, which moves Saturday into the Waterfront Entertainment Centre in Camden, is not a red-hot ticket, it does offer an intriguing (if also highly uneven)
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Is the summer of '96 going to be the most festive in memory for music fans? Sure looks that way. Marathon-length festivals will be blooming all summer long and serving almost every taste, except perhaps for traditional soul/R&B. "All-day events are fun, and give the consumer more value for their dollars," observes Dominic Roncace, general manager of the Blockbuster-Sony Music Entertainment Centre in Camden, where much of the action will be taking place. "And artists have learned that there's strength in numbers, that one and one really makes three," adds Electric Factory concerts' talent booker Neil Jacobson.
NEWS
July 29, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Perry Farrell's Lollapalooza brand debuted in 1991, it let out the angst-ridden howl of alterna-culture staking its claim to the mainstream. Borrowing the all-day carnival concept from European rock festivals, Lollapalooza served up a tattooed fruit basket that succeeded well enough to lead to its own demise. The strength-in-numbers concept spawned niche-marketed summer tours from H.O.R.D.E. to Ozzfest to Warped, and Lolla's mixed bag could no longer compete. The Lollapalooza that played the Tweeter Center on Sunday, the first since 1997, has been retooled for the marketplace.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | by Divina Infusino, Special to the Daily News
Why does Perry Farrell continue to organize Lollapalooza, the annual alternative-rock festival/postmodern cultural circus that will pull into about 30 U.S. cities this summer? Farrell is, after all, a rock star - the leader of Porno for Pyros and, before that, Jane's Addiction, groups that have sold millions of records worldwide. With his magnetic personality, excessive lifestyle and mercurial ways, Farrell established himself in the early '90s as one of the leaders of the alternative-rock scene, as well as one of its visionaries.
NEWS
June 24, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Lollapalooza is dead, and the rest of the summer concert business isn't feeling too good, either. On Monday night, organizers of the traveling alternative-rock circus, scheduled for Aug. 18 and 19 at the Tweeter Center, confronted the possibility of losing millions of dollars due to poor ticket sales and decided instead to cancel the entire 16-city tour. Lollapalooza's demise has caused some to question its choice of acts. But even shows by marquee talents such as Kiss, Jessica Simpson, and Grammy darling Norah Jones are performing sluggishly at the box office this season.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
MOVIES MAY STOP production for any of a hundred reasons ("the script isn't ready," "we can't raise the money," "we've run out of money," etc.), but here's one you thankfully don't hear every day: The disaster movie "Deep Water," about a jet that crashes into the ocean on its way to Beijing, has been put on hold because of its similarities to the missing Malaysian plane, which disappeared on its way to . . . Beijing. Arclight Films said yesterday that preproduction has been halted for the time being.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Phoenix, the electro-tinged French rock band, has been busy this year headlining major rock festivals from Glastonbury to Lollapalooza in support of their fifth album, Bankrupt! The Gallic foursome, fronted by singer Thomas Mars, is set to play the Made in America main stage on Saturday. Last week, Mars spoke from his home in New York, where he lives with his wife (movie director Sofia Coppola) and their two children. "It's been great," Mars said of his summer. It's been spent playing both megagigs such as California's Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival (where they were joined onstage by R. Kelly)
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Jay-Z and Pearl Jam on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Metallica at Bader Field in Atlantic City. Jack White and the Black Keys in Dover, Del.   And scores of other bands besides. This summer, the outsize, multiday music festival that has held sway over the concert business for a decade — and has mirrored the genre-hopping tastes of fans in the digital age — is finally breaking big in the northeastern United States. Every year, fans are lured to destination gatherings such as Coachella in the California desert, Bonnaroo in Manchester, Tenn., and Lollapalooza in Chicago.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
THE GLEEFULLY funky California poptronica band Foster The People has been pumping up the kicks at "a whole lot" of music festivals this summer, shared front guy Mark Foster recently. "Seems like these events are popping up all over the place. Everybody wants a Coachella [the Indio, Calif., desert megafest where FTP's career took off] or a Lollapalooza [now Chicago's big summer draw] that they can call their own. " But Foster can't remember another town - apart from Austin, Texas, during the genormous South By Southwest gathering - where dueling local festivals have been held the same weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
What a must-see week we've had. Big-ticket events, breaking news, rock-star memoirs. It's been like TV's Lollapalooza festival. First, there was the royal wedding. I thought this was the rare sequel that was better than the original. I liked the new cast, and the music was much better this time around. And I loved that final flourish, when the happy couple unexpectedly circled the throng in that tiny clown convertible. It put an absurdist accent on the whole extravaganza. Before our hearts could return to resting rhythm, the president broke into prime time on Sunday to announce that a squad of Navy SEALs had assaulted a compound in Pakistan and killed Osama bin Laden.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2010 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ITALY is known for its delicious food and tourists travel there from around the world to dine on meats, cheeses, pastas and sauces. Cats? Not so much. Italian state TV (RAI) confirmed yesterday that it had suspended Beppe Bigazzi, the 77-year-old host of a popular morning cooking show, after he shocked the nation by talking about much he enjoyed the Tuscan delicacy cat stew. (Felineguini and Claw Sauce?) "Why, people maybe don't eat rabbit, chicken, pigeon?" the white-haired grandfather said.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the front porch of her Vineland home, Joanne Centeno looks across a quiet macadam road at rolling open fields bordered by trees. She sometimes sees deer and wild turkeys scurry by. Those bucolic surroundings will be transformed Aug. 8 to 10 when up to 30,000 concertgoers and campers a day are expected to descend on the 570-acre property for the first Vineland Music Festival. With fans encouraged to pitch tents for the full three days, and a lineup likely to include 100 bands on multiple stages, Centeno and her Cumberland County neighbors are bracing for noise, trash, traffic, rowdiness, and "Lord knows what else.
NEWS
November 27, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
There will be no rollicking Lollapalooza in Fairmount Park next year. The Austin, Texas, outfit that proposed a three-day pop festival for Belmont Plateau in August has withdrawn the bid and is pursuing alternative plans, park officials said yesterday. A competing proposal from Larry Magid's Electric Factory Concerts has not been withdrawn, Magid said late yesterday, although he added that he had strong reservations about the site. The Fairmount Park Commission tabled consideration of the proposed festival this month after listening to objections from park organizations.
NEWS
November 14, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
From Live Aid to Live 8, Philadelphia has hosted its share of mega-concerts. But next summer, a proposed multiday music festival in Fairmount Park could draw even more people to town than those global music events. Call it Philapalooza. Today, the Fairmount Park Commission is scheduled to meet to vote on whether to approve a recommendation by the park's fund-raising wing, the Fairmount Park Conservancy, to contract with C3 Presents to hold a three-day festival in August, featuring 90 to 120 music acts, on Belmont Plateau.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Teenagers in "I Need Supervision" T-shirts are rocking out to old- and new-school punks like NOFX and Against Me! Christian metal fans with the words, "Body Piercing Saved My Soul" emblazoned across their chests (above a picture of Jesus Christ) are pumping their fists to the pummeling attack of Underoath. The beer lines are short, because hardly anyone here is over 21, but there are big crowds at the screenings of Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth and at the Keep a Breast cancer-awareness tent.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|