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Lollipop

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NEWS
April 6, 2007 | By Hannah Dougherty Campbell
Our home in Overbrook Farms in West Philadelphia was built in 1894 and had a gigantic bay window in the living room, one which my mother used as her stage for holiday decorations. Her creative flair (on a shoestring budget) made the most insignificant item take on a life of its own. To wit, the lollipop tree. I don't know where she came up with the idea, but in the 1950s and '60s, with six children one year apart in age - steps and stones, as the Irish say - she gave each one of us a lollipop on Easter Saturday and sent us outside to play and to bury the lollipop stick somewhere in the backyard.
FOOD
October 4, 2012
The world's cuisine is shaped by immigrants - migrations large and small. Jose Garces showcases the influence of Chinese settlers on Peruvian fare at his Chifa. Munish Narula has added an Indo-Chinese menu to the original location of Tiffin. Chinese immigrants in cities such as Calcutta and Mumbai adapted Indian cooking styles and ingredients such as cumin, coriander seeds, and turmeric. Most of the menu is a spice lover's dream - the green chiles in the manchow soup, the red chiles in the kung pao dishes.
NEWS
November 13, 2002 | By Dean P. Johnson
If there was any doubt that Halloween is rapidly gaining on Christmas as the holiday most likely to cause angst, this year laid it to rest at my house. The other evening there was a light tap-tap-tap at my front door. I turned on the porch light and opened the door. Standing there was a small child, who pulled a bright orange pumpkin-shaped lollipop from his coat pocket. "I'd like to return this," he said. "Why?" I asked. "It's defective. " He handed me the candy.
NEWS
June 16, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
If you had a fast car, you could have had access Wednesday night to punk elders of all stripes: goth gods Bauhaus at the Tweeter at 9; No Wave overlords Sonic Youth at Starlight Ballroom at 10. The bracing nightcap at 11? The brusque, sweetly melodic noise of Brit punk godfathers the Buzzcocks, who sold out a sweaty show at the North Star. The Buzzcocks have long stood in shadows. Catty, heartbroken lyricist/singer/guitarist Pete Shelley and guitarist/singer Steve Diggle?
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
It's old home night on CBS, with two series making brief comebacks. On cable, two comedy specials offer subscribers a look at the past and the future of stand-up comedy. THE FACTS OF LIFE (8 p.m., Ch. 3) - The good news is that vintage rock-and- roll heartthrobs Fabian and Bobby Rydell are the guest stars. The bad news is that their appearance is an excuse for a fantasy sequence in which the young women imagine that they're living in the 1960s. Sigh. NBC. THE TWILIGHT ZONE (8 p.m., Ch. 10)
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Katherine Silkaitis, For The Inquirer
A number of girls strolled around the Wells Fargo Center on Friday night in lollipop- and cupcake-studded brassieres. Also frequently sighted were peppermint-striped and fruit-inspired dresses, blue wigs, neon miniskirts, and LED-lit cotton candy. It was the Philadelphia stop of pop star Katy Perry's nine-month "California Dreams" tour, and slightly bizarre outfits with lots of sequins turned out to be the norm. Since the release of her 2008 chart-topping album One of the Boys , the 26-year-old singer has transformed herself into a global celebrity.
FOOD
July 29, 1998 | by Whitney Walker, New York Daily News
Back in the good ol' days, candy built character as much as cavities. We kids licked our own lollipops, sucked our own sourballs, chewed our own gum and crunched our own chocolate bars until our teeth dropped out. It was a do-it-yourself enterprise - and we liked it! But today's kids have it soooo easy. "I remember we had to twirl our hands when we wanted a lollipop, but now kids are pushing a button and it twirls on its own," says Jeff Rubin, vice president of FAO Schweetz, the candy component of FAO Schwarz, which does a brisk business in mechanical candy dispensers, chocolate-bearing plush toys and suckers that spin, glow and even play music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Last spring Mika, the Lebanese-born pop-star-in-the-making, introduced himself with a song named after a Philadelphia-born princess. In "Grace Kelly," the first single from his debut album Life in Cartoon Motion, he asked a question to which he could not imagine a logical answer: "Why don't you like me?" On Thursday night at the Electric Factory, the London pianist, born Mica Penniman, launched his first U.S. tour with a terrifically entertaining, delightfully campy, aerobically energized sold-out show that made not liking him not an option.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charles Norris and Christopher Gift were out in the pre-dawn hours yesterday, just cruising in a car full of their friends on a steamy summer night. But their trip home from a Wawa store ended in tragedy when the car spun out of control on State Road in southern Chester County shortly after 3:30 a.m. and hit a tree broadside. Norris, 15, and Gift, 17, were killed, and the three others in the car were injured. State police said the 1992 Buick Skylark was speeding westbound around a curve near Avon Grove High School when it crossed into the opposite lane, struck a drainage ditch, and then hit the tree on its right side, where Gift and Norris were sitting.
NEWS
February 3, 2008 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
Drs. Fran Rebhun and Susan Trager are on a mission. To them, dental care involves more than brushing those pearly whites twice daily and visiting a dentist every six months. "We want to educate children beginning at a very young age," Trager said. "We want to show them how to take care of their teeth and teach them to make healthy nutritional choices. " For nearly 20 years, the sisters, who live in Voorhees and practice dentistry in Somerdale, have taught dental hygiene and dietary dos and don'ts as a community service to area public and private schools.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
October 4, 2012
The world's cuisine is shaped by immigrants - migrations large and small. Jose Garces showcases the influence of Chinese settlers on Peruvian fare at his Chifa. Munish Narula has added an Indo-Chinese menu to the original location of Tiffin. Chinese immigrants in cities such as Calcutta and Mumbai adapted Indian cooking styles and ingredients such as cumin, coriander seeds, and turmeric. Most of the menu is a spice lover's dream - the green chiles in the manchow soup, the red chiles in the kung pao dishes.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Katherine Silkaitis, For The Inquirer
A number of girls strolled around the Wells Fargo Center on Friday night in lollipop- and cupcake-studded brassieres. Also frequently sighted were peppermint-striped and fruit-inspired dresses, blue wigs, neon miniskirts, and LED-lit cotton candy. It was the Philadelphia stop of pop star Katy Perry's nine-month "California Dreams" tour, and slightly bizarre outfits with lots of sequins turned out to be the norm. Since the release of her 2008 chart-topping album One of the Boys , the 26-year-old singer has transformed herself into a global celebrity.
NEWS
February 3, 2008 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
Drs. Fran Rebhun and Susan Trager are on a mission. To them, dental care involves more than brushing those pearly whites twice daily and visiting a dentist every six months. "We want to educate children beginning at a very young age," Trager said. "We want to show them how to take care of their teeth and teach them to make healthy nutritional choices. " For nearly 20 years, the sisters, who live in Voorhees and practice dentistry in Somerdale, have taught dental hygiene and dietary dos and don'ts as a community service to area public and private schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Last spring Mika, the Lebanese-born pop-star-in-the-making, introduced himself with a song named after a Philadelphia-born princess. In "Grace Kelly," the first single from his debut album Life in Cartoon Motion, he asked a question to which he could not imagine a logical answer: "Why don't you like me?" On Thursday night at the Electric Factory, the London pianist, born Mica Penniman, launched his first U.S. tour with a terrifically entertaining, delightfully campy, aerobically energized sold-out show that made not liking him not an option.
NEWS
April 6, 2007 | By Hannah Dougherty Campbell
Our home in Overbrook Farms in West Philadelphia was built in 1894 and had a gigantic bay window in the living room, one which my mother used as her stage for holiday decorations. Her creative flair (on a shoestring budget) made the most insignificant item take on a life of its own. To wit, the lollipop tree. I don't know where she came up with the idea, but in the 1950s and '60s, with six children one year apart in age - steps and stones, as the Irish say - she gave each one of us a lollipop on Easter Saturday and sent us outside to play and to bury the lollipop stick somewhere in the backyard.
NEWS
June 16, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
If you had a fast car, you could have had access Wednesday night to punk elders of all stripes: goth gods Bauhaus at the Tweeter at 9; No Wave overlords Sonic Youth at Starlight Ballroom at 10. The bracing nightcap at 11? The brusque, sweetly melodic noise of Brit punk godfathers the Buzzcocks, who sold out a sweaty show at the North Star. The Buzzcocks have long stood in shadows. Catty, heartbroken lyricist/singer/guitarist Pete Shelley and guitarist/singer Steve Diggle?
NEWS
November 13, 2002 | By Dean P. Johnson
If there was any doubt that Halloween is rapidly gaining on Christmas as the holiday most likely to cause angst, this year laid it to rest at my house. The other evening there was a light tap-tap-tap at my front door. I turned on the porch light and opened the door. Standing there was a small child, who pulled a bright orange pumpkin-shaped lollipop from his coat pocket. "I'd like to return this," he said. "Why?" I asked. "It's defective. " He handed me the candy.
FOOD
July 29, 1998 | by Whitney Walker, New York Daily News
Back in the good ol' days, candy built character as much as cavities. We kids licked our own lollipops, sucked our own sourballs, chewed our own gum and crunched our own chocolate bars until our teeth dropped out. It was a do-it-yourself enterprise - and we liked it! But today's kids have it soooo easy. "I remember we had to twirl our hands when we wanted a lollipop, but now kids are pushing a button and it twirls on its own," says Jeff Rubin, vice president of FAO Schweetz, the candy component of FAO Schwarz, which does a brisk business in mechanical candy dispensers, chocolate-bearing plush toys and suckers that spin, glow and even play music.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charles Norris and Christopher Gift were out in the pre-dawn hours yesterday, just cruising in a car full of their friends on a steamy summer night. But their trip home from a Wawa store ended in tragedy when the car spun out of control on State Road in southern Chester County shortly after 3:30 a.m. and hit a tree broadside. Norris, 15, and Gift, 17, were killed, and the three others in the car were injured. State police said the 1992 Buick Skylark was speeding westbound around a curve near Avon Grove High School when it crossed into the opposite lane, struck a drainage ditch, and then hit the tree on its right side, where Gift and Norris were sitting.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | by Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
If a bald, stocky man greets you by pressing a lollipop into your hand, please accept it and take a lick or two. If you refuse the sweet, you might hurt the feelings of 73-year-old Sid Shore, who's getting quite a name in the Northeast as "The Lollipop Man. " Shore works for Firstrust Bank at its main offices at Castor and Cottman avenues. He wears a bronze badge with black letters reading "Good Will Ambassador. " His office is on the bank's first floor, and he frequently takes a peek to see if its six tellers are busy.
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