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NEWS
October 24, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Some conductors may be naturals, but each finds his way to the podium via a different route. Take Franz Welser-Moest, 30, the Austrian who will make his first appearance with the Philadelphia Orchestra tomorrow. He is now 16 years into his career, and has just taken a leap upward by being appointed music director of the London Philharmonic. Not artistic adviser or principal conductor, but music director, with all the responsibilities music directors of American orchestras have.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter, in the midst of a trade mission to the United Kingdom and Israel, announced Monday that the Philadelphia Orchestra will tour Europe in 2015. The orchestra will conclude its tour with two performances in London, Nutter said. The mayor called the orchestra "a vital cultural ambassador for the city, and one that brings tremendous economic development to the city by making the case for doing business in Philadelphia. " Nutter pointed out that the orchestra, with music director Eugene Ormandy, toured Britain in 1949, becoming the first orchestra from America to cross the Atlantic after World War II. The ensemble performed 28 concerts in 27 days in England and Scotland.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Because Klaus Tennstedt had canceled his appearances, Austrian conductor Franz Welser-Moest, music director of the London Philharmonic, made his second appearance of the season last night with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. Welser-Moest partially changed the program, keeping the Beethoven Symphony No. 6, but replacing the scheduled Beethoven Symphony No. 7 with Schumann's Symphony No. 2. That change produced a program that shifted the focus from composer to musical mood, and made the program an essay on German romantic approaches to images of nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2002 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The Kimmel Center will host at least six major visiting orchestras next season, plus the first visit by superstar Italian mezzo Cecilia Bartoli in 11 years. Four international orchestras are already inked in: the Kirov Orchestra with jet-set conductor Valery Gergiev, the Vienna Philharmonic led by Nikolaus Harnoncourt, the London Philharmonic under Kurt Masur, and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra with Lorin Maazel. We'll also hear the Pittsburgh Symphony with Mariss Jansons and the Cleveland Orchestra led by Franz Welser-Most.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Kurt Masur has been named music director of the New York Philharmonic, ending a 1 1/2-year search to find Zubin Mehta's successor. At a news conference yesterday in New York, Stephen Stamas, chairman of the Philharmonic's board of directors, announced that Masur had accepted a five- year appointment to begin during the 1992-93 season. Mehta will leave the orchestra after 13 years, at the end of the 1990-91 season. During 1991-92, Masur will serve as music director-designate, conducting two weeks of subscription concerts in addition to planning future seasons and auditioning players.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
New releases in compact discs are, in a sense, resurrecting the dead by making available historic performances by such artists as Arthur Rubinstein, Maria Callas, John Barbirolli, Eugene List, Otto Klemperer and Wanda Landowska. Nothing wondrous in these resurrections, only the shrewd business sense of recording companies that have years of music on digital tape that now can be transferred to CD format. The growing availability of these performances will further limit public interest in vinyl LP records.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2001 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Still only 19, pianist Lang Lang is a phenomenon. His young career is all landmarks - taking over for an ailing Andre Watts in Chicago, playing a Bach "Goldberg Variations" at an after-concert party that made the Chicago papers, filling in with the Philadelphia Orchestra in the Mendelssohn Concerto in May, and now playing the Prokofiev Third Concerto at their final programs in the Academy. In June, the Chinese-born Lang accompanied the Orchestra to Beijing, where he played with them at the Grand Hall of the People.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Any time one of the world's great orchestras plays a great special-occasion piece like Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, you don't have to be psychic to predict that the hall will be packed and the audience will leave exhilarated. So it was in the Philadelphia Orchestra's final program of the season at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall, which delivered more than I could hope for in some ways - and a bit less in others. The concert's first half is a moving target this week, thanks to the inaugural festival of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1986 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Mozart, Beethoven: Quintets for piano and winds in E-Flat. Andre Previn, piano; Vienna Wind Soloists (Telarc). Murray Perehia, piano; members of the English Chamber Orchestra (CBS). These two quintets were written 13 years apart: Mozart considered his unified chamber work "the best work I have yet composed" and Beethoven followed with a miniature piano concerto as tribute - or competition (he inserted an improvised piano solo at the premiere, which miffed the four wind players)
NEWS
November 26, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For reasons people don't often have the courage to contemplate, passionate love for music also comes with an inexorable need to prioritize. What's the best? Who's the best? You saw it in the Stephen Frears movie High Fidelity. And it's spread all over the December issue of Gramophone magazine, which lists the world's top 20 orchestras. Philadelphia's isn't among them. The story gets worse: Philadelphia rates a paragraph in a sidebar headed "Past Glories," along with the NBC Symphony Orchestra, which ceased to be in the 1950s.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Fresh from appearing with the fabled Vienna State Opera, Yannick Nézet-Séguin was at the epicenter recently when shockwaves rippled through the cultural world, as that company's chief conductor, Franz Welser-Möst, abruptly walked out with minimum explanation. "Surreal" and "very quiet" was Nézet-Séguin's report from the belly of the beast. But after his successful debut in the Austrian capital conducting The Flying Dutchman , should Philadelphians worry that Vienna is prowling after the Philadelphia Orchestra's popular and still-newish music director, as the Metropolitan Opera has long been rumored to be doing?
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter, in the midst of a trade mission to the United Kingdom and Israel, announced Monday that the Philadelphia Orchestra will tour Europe in 2015. The orchestra will conclude its tour with two performances in London, Nutter said. The mayor called the orchestra "a vital cultural ambassador for the city, and one that brings tremendous economic development to the city by making the case for doing business in Philadelphia. " Nutter pointed out that the orchestra, with music director Eugene Ormandy, toured Britain in 1949, becoming the first orchestra from America to cross the Atlantic after World War II. The ensemble performed 28 concerts in 27 days in England and Scotland.
NEWS
November 26, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For reasons people don't often have the courage to contemplate, passionate love for music also comes with an inexorable need to prioritize. What's the best? Who's the best? You saw it in the Stephen Frears movie High Fidelity. And it's spread all over the December issue of Gramophone magazine, which lists the world's top 20 orchestras. Philadelphia's isn't among them. The story gets worse: Philadelphia rates a paragraph in a sidebar headed "Past Glories," along with the NBC Symphony Orchestra, which ceased to be in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2007 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
For seven years, Philadelphia Orchestra audiences have hailed the entrance of concertmaster David Kim to tune the ensemble before a performance. The violinist's tuning is really a symbolic post - the oboe has the most accurate A - but the job entails more than just brilliant playing. The concertmaster leads the violin section, marks the bowings on new or unfamiliar pieces and serves as a professional example. Occasionally, a concertmaster also acts as liaison between management and the musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Any time one of the world's great orchestras plays a great special-occasion piece like Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, you don't have to be psychic to predict that the hall will be packed and the audience will leave exhilarated. So it was in the Philadelphia Orchestra's final program of the season at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall, which delivered more than I could hope for in some ways - and a bit less in others. The concert's first half is a moving target this week, thanks to the inaugural festival of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2002 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The Kimmel Center will host at least six major visiting orchestras next season, plus the first visit by superstar Italian mezzo Cecilia Bartoli in 11 years. Four international orchestras are already inked in: the Kirov Orchestra with jet-set conductor Valery Gergiev, the Vienna Philharmonic led by Nikolaus Harnoncourt, the London Philharmonic under Kurt Masur, and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra with Lorin Maazel. We'll also hear the Pittsburgh Symphony with Mariss Jansons and the Cleveland Orchestra led by Franz Welser-Most.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2001 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Still only 19, pianist Lang Lang is a phenomenon. His young career is all landmarks - taking over for an ailing Andre Watts in Chicago, playing a Bach "Goldberg Variations" at an after-concert party that made the Chicago papers, filling in with the Philadelphia Orchestra in the Mendelssohn Concerto in May, and now playing the Prokofiev Third Concerto at their final programs in the Academy. In June, the Chinese-born Lang accompanied the Orchestra to Beijing, where he played with them at the Grand Hall of the People.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Wolfgang Sawallisch, conducting; Leonidas Kavakos, violinist. 8 p.m. Thursday and Tuesday, 2 p.m. Friday at Academy of Music. Tickets: $18-60. Info: 215-893-1999. Those who were fortunate enough to hear Greek-born violinist Leonidas Kavakos play the Tchaikovsky Concerto with brilliance at the Mann two seasons ago have eagerly anticipated his Academy debut. He'll be playing another repertory standard, the beloved Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, with Maestro Sawallisch also leading Schubert's Third Symphony and Mozart's deeply moving Symphony No. 40. "For me, the Mendelssohn is romantic Mozart," explained Kavakos, "music so flawlessly right that I can imagine he just took a pen and wrote it right down just like Mozart.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There has been a hint of mystery in Philadelphia about Franz Welser-Moest. The Austrian conductor was 29 when he bowed here in 1990. His resume was brief to the point of invisibility; his name put together for performance purposes and a personal background that had more than its share of improbabilities. As he returns at 35 to the orchestra, he has achieved international stature, gained a name as a tough London orchestra builder and is turning musical and personal corners of importance.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What a difference a year makes. Last year, the Philadelphia Orchestra was London's media joke. Because the orchestra had refused to fly on American or British planes in the aftermath of the gulf war, it canceled its scheduled tour-opener here in Royal Festival Hall. The British papers guffawed, and the hall's manager produced his mot of the year: "It's hard to believe that a nation that produced Stormin' Norman (Schwarzkopf) could produce such timorous musicians. " All that has passed.
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