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Long Beach Township

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NEWS
August 24, 2003 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is how bad the bickering on Long Beach Island has gotten (and we're not talking about what goes on between the New Yorkers and the Philly people): One day, unsuspecting Mickey King, deputy public-works nice guy for Beach Haven, goes to return an air impact hammer he borrowed from his public-works pals in Long Beach Township. He's always borrowing stuff from his counterparts up the island to help take care of the beaches. And vice versa. After all, if one guy's beach goes under, you could say it's not good for the rest of the island.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holgate, meet Barnegat Light. Go ahead, Beach Haven, get on board and get off in North Beach, though what you'll do up there on the side of the Long Beach Island road, surrounded by "Private Road, No Beach Access" signs is another issue. Not to worry, another bus will be arriving shortly. This is the utopian vision of a united and welcoming Long Beach Island being fostered by Joe Lattanzi, a Long Beach Township commissioner. His dream, which drifts toward shared services and a post-Sandy tourist- and business-friendly island, consists of free public transportation: six 14-seat buses running the length of the island from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Free!
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
LONG BEACH TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Like the sea itself - or perhaps more like a long-running soap opera - the tide seems to constantly ebb and flow over beach access at the New Jersey Shore. Over the past several decades, the issue has many times played out in the courts over whether the public has enough access to the state's 127-mile Atlantic coastline or if the rights of municipalities and beachfront property owners are being unfairly infringed upon by mandatory regulations. The State of New Jersey has been found on both sides of the topic - sometimes being accused of trying to take too much control of the strands in the name of the public good while at other times defending regulations that seem to limit the public's access to beaches and waterways.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When hurricane-like winds whipped up the waters of the Jersey Shore last week, Long Beach Mayor James Mancini saw the ocean swallow up his beaches with the tide. And Jeff Vogel saw opportunity. Just a few weeks earlier, Vogel had discovered a thick vein of white sand at his family's Ocean County sand-and-gravel mining operation. So when calamity hit the Jersey coast, he hopped in his truck and paid a visit to Long Beach Island's shore towns just a few minutes away, offering local officials an essential commodity they were suddenly lacking: sand.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Check out the police blotters in the towns that dot this 18-mile sliver of an island and you get an idea of how wild things can get here. Just last week: In Surf City, a 21-year-old man was arrested for sleeping in his car. In Ship Bottom, two teenage girls took a flag from in front of a gas station and were waving it around and making patriotic remarks. The police took the flag away from them and asked them not to do that again. Also in Ship Bottom, some fiend took a child's yellow boogie board (a small, plastic surfboard)
REAL_ESTATE
October 20, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Hurricane Sandy bypassed the scrub pines on Carol and Scott Townsleys' bayfront property on Long Beach Island when it disgorged its venom on the region two years ago this month. The same can't be said for what Sandy's 80-m.p.h. winds did to the couple's remaining possessions, and their lives. The casualty count: The 21-foot sailboat. "I raised the boat three feet above the bulkhead," said Scott Townsley, 60. He also tied it to the bulkhead and to the lift. He thought those measures would offer enough resistance.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will be at least a week before residents are allowed to return to Long Beach Island, Mayor Joseph Mancini of Long Beach Township said Wednesday. The 18-mile-long barrier island was among the hardest hit by superstorm Sandy, which ravaged the east coast this week. Whole neighborhoods were swamped with sand and lavish beachfront houses were left gutted, their appliances cast across the streets. "It's carnage," the mayor said. "There's no water, sewer or power. Anyone who's still here, we're encouraging to leave now. " Of the approximately 10,000 people who live on the island outside of the summer months, about 1,000 remain, Mancini said.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONG BEACH, N.J. - Cars were submerged in three feet of sand. Six feet of water added insult to injury. Then, nine days later, snow blanketed the town. Those are some of the lasting images of the Sandy-battered Shore for first responders in this barrier island town. On Saturday, some of them saw for the first time an island transformed, nearly returned to its old self. Seven months after Sandy made landfall, hitting North Jersey and New York the hardest but also causing significant damage to southern Shore towns like this one, Mayor Joseph Mancini and other locals thanked hundreds of first responders Saturday for their efforts.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A landscaper who helped rescue a Pennsylvania boy after the collapse of a six-foot-deep sand tunnel that the 16-year-old had been digging with his cousin on a Loveladies beach could not get the anguished cries of the boy's mother out of his mind yesterday. "All night, in my mind I just kept hearing her screaming and crying, 'Save him! Save him!' over and over again," said Tony Scali of Manahawkin. The collapse Monday afternoon on the nearly deserted Ocean County beach took place just yards from where Scali and his crew were working.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
So-called common-sense rules that would allow Jersey Shore towns to create their own plans for public beach access were formally proposed Monday by the state Department of Environmental Protection, to the delight of municipalities and the consternation of some environmental groups. The plan - which would do away with the requirement that municipalities provide 24/7 access to public areas to qualify for beach-replenishment funds - would take into account each town's unique circumstances, according to officials.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
James S. Bishop, 73, of Germantown, retired owner of the former Main Line furniture store O'Neill & Bishop, died off Long Beach Township, N.J., on Sunday, Sept. 18, in what authorities reported as a drowning. Mr. Bishop had left his home on Long Beach Island about 4:30 p.m. Sunday. An unidentified surfer, in a 911 call at 5:39 p.m., reported pulling the body from the ocean, a spokesman for the Ocean County prosecutor stated. Mr. Bishop was pronounced dead at Southern Ocean Medical Center at 6:35 p.m. Sunday, the spokesman said.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
LONG BEACH TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Like the sea itself - or perhaps more like a long-running soap opera - the tide seems to constantly ebb and flow over beach access at the New Jersey Shore. Over the past several decades, the issue has many times played out in the courts over whether the public has enough access to the state's 127-mile Atlantic coastline or if the rights of municipalities and beachfront property owners are being unfairly infringed upon by mandatory regulations. The State of New Jersey has been found on both sides of the topic - sometimes being accused of trying to take too much control of the strands in the name of the public good while at other times defending regulations that seem to limit the public's access to beaches and waterways.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
NORTH WILDWOOD - For some politicos, it may be all about poll numbers right now. But up and down the New Jersey coastline, where the local economy depends on the popularity of a beach town with summer visitors, officials say the only numbers that matter this time of the year involve cubic yards - as in the amount of sand on their beachfronts. Tourism in New Jersey is a $42-billion-a-year enterprise that employs more than 300,000 people and accounts for more than 6 percent of all jobs, according to the Department of Labor.
REAL_ESTATE
October 20, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Hurricane Sandy bypassed the scrub pines on Carol and Scott Townsleys' bayfront property on Long Beach Island when it disgorged its venom on the region two years ago this month. The same can't be said for what Sandy's 80-m.p.h. winds did to the couple's remaining possessions, and their lives. The casualty count: The 21-foot sailboat. "I raised the boat three feet above the bulkhead," said Scott Townsley, 60. He also tied it to the bulkhead and to the lift. He thought those measures would offer enough resistance.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holgate, meet Barnegat Light. Go ahead, Beach Haven, get on board and get off in North Beach, though what you'll do up there on the side of the Long Beach Island road, surrounded by "Private Road, No Beach Access" signs is another issue. Not to worry, another bus will be arriving shortly. This is the utopian vision of a united and welcoming Long Beach Island being fostered by Joe Lattanzi, a Long Beach Township commissioner. His dream, which drifts toward shared services and a post-Sandy tourist- and business-friendly island, consists of free public transportation: six 14-seat buses running the length of the island from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Free!
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
MARGATE, N.J. - For one family, it was three generations of Shore home that had to come tumbling down after Sandy. For another, it was their first house, the children's handprints newly pressed into concrete. But their different situations led to the same place on the obstacle-laden post-Sandy road: demolition. "It's a goner," said preschool teacher Janet Shepler, 44, whose home at Wellington and Dudley Avenues now has only a backyard slide, a patio, and a low brick wall that once had heralded the brand-new neighborhood of Ventnor Heights.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONG BEACH, N.J. - Cars were submerged in three feet of sand. Six feet of water added insult to injury. Then, nine days later, snow blanketed the town. Those are some of the lasting images of the Sandy-battered Shore for first responders in this barrier island town. On Saturday, some of them saw for the first time an island transformed, nearly returned to its old self. Seven months after Sandy made landfall, hitting North Jersey and New York the hardest but also causing significant damage to southern Shore towns like this one, Mayor Joseph Mancini and other locals thanked hundreds of first responders Saturday for their efforts.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will be at least a week before residents are allowed to return to Long Beach Island, Mayor Joseph Mancini of Long Beach Township said Wednesday. The 18-mile-long barrier island was among the hardest hit by superstorm Sandy, which ravaged the east coast this week. Whole neighborhoods were swamped with sand and lavish beachfront houses were left gutted, their appliances cast across the streets. "It's carnage," the mayor said. "There's no water, sewer or power. Anyone who's still here, we're encouraging to leave now. " Of the approximately 10,000 people who live on the island outside of the summer months, about 1,000 remain, Mancini said.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
LONG BEACH TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Ever wonder what the No. 1 issue is for visitors to the Jersey Shore? A new poll finds it's where to go to the bathroom. According to a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday, the beach, boardwalk, and Atlantic City are state residents' favorite destinations for a Jersey vacation. But the poll showed New Jerseyans overwhelmingly want more bathrooms near the beach. Eighty-three percent of respondents said the state should require Shore towns to provide restrooms at the beach.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
LONG BEACH TOWNSHIP, N.J. - New Jersey might redo its proposed beach-access rules to more clearly spell out the public's right to reach the beach, a top environmental official said Thursday, as some at a public hearing likened the proposal to segregation-era racial politics. Ray Cantor, a top aide to Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin, acknowledged that many people had concerns about the proposed rules, which rely more on cooperation from towns than on threats from state regulators.
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