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NEWS
February 13, 1990
When a boxing match ends with one of the contenders flat on his back, the outcome usually isn't in doubt. Not so on Sunday, when James "Buster" Douglas sent Mike Tyson to dreamland in the 10th round of their fight in Tokyo for the heavyweight championship. Officials of the World Boxing Association (WBA) and the World Boxing Council (WBC), two of the three sanctioning bodies in professional boxing, have refused to accept the outcome - this because of a referee's mistake in giving Mr. Douglas a "long count" when he was floored by Mr. Tyson in round 8. To people who watched the fight it was clear Mr. Douglas could have gotten to his feet in time if the ref had counted correctly.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | BY MORGAN MEIS, For the Daily News
THE WORLD will soon come to an end. Everybody knows that by now. The Mayans predicted the coming cataclysm more than a thousand years ago: Dec. 21, 2012, or, at the latest, Dec. 23. It is strange, then, that "Maya: 2012 Lords of Time," the exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, runs through Jan. 13. Clearly, a major scheduling error has occurred. The Maya were an ancient civilization that flourished in what is now Central America and southern Mexico.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If those sensitive souls who periodically seek to abolish boxing had any smarts, they'd sit back and let "Promoter" Don King do it for them. King damaged the so-called sweet science more over the weekend than a succession of abolitionists dating back to Estes Kefauver, the U.S. senator from Tennessee who used a 1960 congressional witch hunt into boxing to revive his waning political career. For starters, the ever-greedy King led supposedly indestructible heavyweight champion Mike Tyson to a stunning knockout loss by James "Buster" Douglas, a guy who wasn't expected to provide even a decent tuneup for Tyson's June 18 defense against top contender Evander Holyfield.
SPORTS
July 11, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Saying he would miss coaching too much to leave it, Chuck Daly announced yesterday that he was declining an offer from network television and would try to lead the Detroit Pistons to a third consecutive NBA championship. "I really don't know anything else," Daly said at a news conference in Auburn Hills, Mich. "This is what I've always done. I'm a basketball coach. " General manager Jack McCloskey said Daly would return for an eighth season under a new multiyear contract. Details were undisclosed.
SPORTS
February 14, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two astonishing victories - one in the ring, the other in the boardrooms of the wheelers and dealers - James "Buster" Douglas is relieved. He is relieved that he can start preparing for his first title defense. More than that, however, he is relieved that he has a title to defend. In what had to qualify as the second-biggest surprise of the week, the World Boxing Council and the World Boxing Association yesterday ruled that Douglas should be recognized as the undisputed heavyweight champion.
SPORTS
February 12, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Tyson likes to say that he is the best fighter on the planet. All of his opponents, reckless enough to dispute that claim, ended up wearing their faces backward - courtesy of the most powerful fists in the heavyweight division. "I'm the best fighter on the planet. " After his shocking performance Sunday in Tokyo, Tyson must either amend his grandiose statement or find a new planet. James "Buster" Douglas, a journeyman who had inflicted his greatest punishment on the weight scale, knocked out the undisputed heavyweight champion in the 10th round of their scheduled 12-round bout.
SPORTS
February 28, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Mike Tyson floored James "Buster" Douglas in the eighth round of their historic fight on Feb. 11 in Tokyo, the challenger got up at the count of nine. As it turned out, however, Douglas survived one shelling only to face another - this one from promoter Don King, who was sitting at ringside. When Douglas went down, King got up, screaming joyously, "Fight's over! Fight's over! We won! We won!" About eight seconds later, King canceled his victory celebration, his joy turning to disbelief and then to rage.
SPORTS
October 24, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boxing is a brutal sport. The fighters get battered, busted and beaten - and then they have to step into the ring. The latest atrocity has been committed against Evander Holyfield, the No. 1 contender, who will meet James "Buster" Douglas, the undisputed heavyweight champion, tomorrow night at the Mirage. Holyfield has reached an agreement that, if he wins, commits him to fight George Foreman next year. But the three sanctioning bodies have ruled that no matter who emerges as the winner tomorrow night, the next man in line for a title bout must be Mike Tyson.
NEWS
February 19, 1990 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If there's anything more gratifying than seeing a Don King hustle blow up in his face, it's seeing it happen twice in little more than a week. New heavyweight champ James "Buster" Douglas did it again yesterday when his manager announced Buster will make his first title defense in September against number-one contender Evander Holyfield, thus giving ex-champ Mike Tyson at least a year to ponder the folly of his association with King. Sure, the choice will cost Douglas a share of what would have been the richest gate in boxing history.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
One of the greatest upsets in boxing history was in danger of being nullified as two of the sport's governing bodies yesterday suspended their recognition of James "Buster" Douglas' knockout defeat of Mike Tyson until a dispute over a long count was resolved. The controversy developed shortly after the stunning conclusion to the heavyweight-title fight when Don King, the promoter and a Tyson adviser, complained that Douglas had been given at least 12 seconds to rise from the canvas when he was knocked down in the eighth round early yesterday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | BY MORGAN MEIS, For the Daily News
THE WORLD will soon come to an end. Everybody knows that by now. The Mayans predicted the coming cataclysm more than a thousand years ago: Dec. 21, 2012, or, at the latest, Dec. 23. It is strange, then, that "Maya: 2012 Lords of Time," the exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, runs through Jan. 13. Clearly, a major scheduling error has occurred. The Maya were an ancient civilization that flourished in what is now Central America and southern Mexico.
SPORTS
November 16, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rick Brunson has never been guaranteed anything in the NBA, most notably a contract. The 1995 Temple graduate has been a true survivor, living a year-to-year NBA existence, which is now in its eighth season. Brunson, 32, a reserve point guard with the Los Angeles Clippers, has played for six teams, including two, the New York Knicks and Chicago Bulls, twice. He also has played for the same coach, Mike Dunleavy, in two cities. With all that movement, one thing has remained a constant in Brunson's career: the lack of a fully-guaranteed contract to start a season.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Those elusive deer. Even Air Force pilots with infrared sensors couldn't quite get a handle on them. Any area residents who were sitting on the edges of their seats waiting for the results of the aerial deer survey taken in March will just have to sit back, kick up their feet and sleep through the summer. The much-awaited deer count is not to be - at least not until next fall, when the leaves have dropped and AirScan Inc. can survey the barren ground again for the area's newest nemesis and record it on videotape.
SPORTS
October 24, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boxing is a brutal sport. The fighters get battered, busted and beaten - and then they have to step into the ring. The latest atrocity has been committed against Evander Holyfield, the No. 1 contender, who will meet James "Buster" Douglas, the undisputed heavyweight champion, tomorrow night at the Mirage. Holyfield has reached an agreement that, if he wins, commits him to fight George Foreman next year. But the three sanctioning bodies have ruled that no matter who emerges as the winner tomorrow night, the next man in line for a title bout must be Mike Tyson.
SPORTS
July 11, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Saying he would miss coaching too much to leave it, Chuck Daly announced yesterday that he was declining an offer from network television and would try to lead the Detroit Pistons to a third consecutive NBA championship. "I really don't know anything else," Daly said at a news conference in Auburn Hills, Mich. "This is what I've always done. I'm a basketball coach. " General manager Jack McCloskey said Daly would return for an eighth season under a new multiyear contract. Details were undisclosed.
SPORTS
February 28, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Mike Tyson floored James "Buster" Douglas in the eighth round of their historic fight on Feb. 11 in Tokyo, the challenger got up at the count of nine. As it turned out, however, Douglas survived one shelling only to face another - this one from promoter Don King, who was sitting at ringside. When Douglas went down, King got up, screaming joyously, "Fight's over! Fight's over! We won! We won!" About eight seconds later, King canceled his victory celebration, his joy turning to disbelief and then to rage.
NEWS
February 19, 1990 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If there's anything more gratifying than seeing a Don King hustle blow up in his face, it's seeing it happen twice in little more than a week. New heavyweight champ James "Buster" Douglas did it again yesterday when his manager announced Buster will make his first title defense in September against number-one contender Evander Holyfield, thus giving ex-champ Mike Tyson at least a year to ponder the folly of his association with King. Sure, the choice will cost Douglas a share of what would have been the richest gate in boxing history.
SPORTS
February 14, 1990 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two astonishing victories - one in the ring, the other in the boardrooms of the wheelers and dealers - James "Buster" Douglas is relieved. He is relieved that he can start preparing for his first title defense. More than that, however, he is relieved that he has a title to defend. In what had to qualify as the second-biggest surprise of the week, the World Boxing Council and the World Boxing Association yesterday ruled that Douglas should be recognized as the undisputed heavyweight champion.
NEWS
February 13, 1990
When a boxing match ends with one of the contenders flat on his back, the outcome usually isn't in doubt. Not so on Sunday, when James "Buster" Douglas sent Mike Tyson to dreamland in the 10th round of their fight in Tokyo for the heavyweight championship. Officials of the World Boxing Association (WBA) and the World Boxing Council (WBC), two of the three sanctioning bodies in professional boxing, have refused to accept the outcome - this because of a referee's mistake in giving Mr. Douglas a "long count" when he was floored by Mr. Tyson in round 8. To people who watched the fight it was clear Mr. Douglas could have gotten to his feet in time if the ref had counted correctly.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If those sensitive souls who periodically seek to abolish boxing had any smarts, they'd sit back and let "Promoter" Don King do it for them. King damaged the so-called sweet science more over the weekend than a succession of abolitionists dating back to Estes Kefauver, the U.S. senator from Tennessee who used a 1960 congressional witch hunt into boxing to revive his waning political career. For starters, the ever-greedy King led supposedly indestructible heavyweight champion Mike Tyson to a stunning knockout loss by James "Buster" Douglas, a guy who wasn't expected to provide even a decent tuneup for Tyson's June 18 defense against top contender Evander Holyfield.
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