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Long Life

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NEWS
July 13, 1999 | By Mindy Rudd
You haven't really lived until you've done Hershey Park on a Sunday in June with the heat index hovering in the three digits, most of your in-laws in tow (five kids, eight grown-ups), and enough noise, humidity and junk food to turn even the gentlest soul into a Jerry Springer guest. This is how I spent a recent Sunday. And in spite of my being practically drowned on a wild rapids ride and almost tossing my cookies on the Tilt-a-Whirl, it was pretty much exactly what one of these days should be: fun and exhausting.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | By Msgr. S.J. Adamo
At the beach house in Brant Beach many years ago, we were reminiscing about early childhood. One of our guys claimed he could remember suckling at his mother's breast. No one believed him, especially when he added that he had a faint recollection of swimming in amniotic fluid. Yet he turned out to be a fearless swimmer in the rough surf of the Atlantic - perhaps because of his alleged long experience. I can remember nestling at my mother's breast and reciting the Hail Mary in Italian with her (Mom never learned to speak any English except "hello" and "goodbye")
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | By Amy Westfeldt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One-hundred-and-nine-year-old Bertha Cole, wearing a bright pink ribbon in her white hair, sank her chin into her chest and nodded off in her wheelchair in the common room of the Mount Holly Center. Visitors leaned over her and shouted questions into her ear, and she didn't move. How old are you? "I don't know, honey," she said, yawning. But a mention of her church, the Broad Street United Methodist Church in Burlington City, instantly made Cole alert. Her eyes widened and her toothless mouth opened to speak.
NEWS
November 26, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William S. Rile, 101, of Gwynedd, a former engineer who studied the post-retirement fates of colleagues at Bell of Pennsylvania in an effort to discover the key to a long life, died Nov. 16 at Foulkeways, a retirement community. Mr. Rile had worked at Bell of Pennsylvania (now Verizon) for 42 years when at age 60 he reached the company's optional retirement age. He couldn't decide whether to stay or go. He wanted to live a long life and wondered whether continuing to work or retiring was the better idea.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martha Miller has never had a car. Never learned to drive, in fact. "And I get everywhere I need to go," the diminutive 74-year-old says with a smile. It's no surprise that Miller always finds a way. It is a recurring theme in her long life of quiet accomplishment. Amid the chronic drug traffic and attendant crime of a struggling, low-income corner of lower Bucks County, the softspoken great-grandmother has, for a quarter-century, found ways of bringing hope to thousands of needy children and adults.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The answer was as simple, honest and direct as the man himself. Before the celebration/love fest at the New Central Baptist Church to mark his birthday had even begun yesterday, before the best wishes delivered personally by Mayor Rendell and U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, before the reading of greetings and citations sent by President Clinton, Gov. Ridge, City Council, the Pennsylvania Senate and House of Representatives, before the gifts, the speeches...
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Frederick K. Bayer entered public service 30 years ago, he knew it would be a lifetime commitment. Just as his grandfather and father before him, Bayer has dedicated much of his adult life to serving his community - choosing not to leave the town but to stay and see it grow. And he has been an integral part of its growth from a largely commercial town to a professional hub of lawyers, judges, and title and insurance companies surrounding the county Justice Complex. Three generations of Bayers have made their impact on the city: Bayer's grandfather Frederick L. Bayer served on the City Council in the early 1900s, and his father, Frederick L. Bayer Jr., operated a successful moving business that Bayer later took over.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013
Q: Kimberly, who are the healthiest and longest-living people? - Inquiring Mind Wants to Know A: Well, according to the experts, we may live in the wealthiest nation in the world, but the healthiest and longest-living people are in Japan-Okinawa, to be exact. Okinawans have significantly lower incidence rates of heart disease, as well as breast, ovarian and prostate cancer when compared to Americans. They live healthily into their late 80s and 90s. Some experts link Okinawans' long life spans with their diets, rich in grains, fruits and fish.
NEWS
September 16, 2011
LILLIAN DAVIS O'DANIEL celebrated her 100th birthday on Sept. 1. The West Philadelphia native devoted her long life to education. She died Sept. 8. She lived in West Philadelphia. Lillian was born in Philadelphia when Theodore Roosevelt was president. She was raised in Boston but returned to Philadelphia to attend the University of Pennsylvania, where she received degrees in education. She joined Delta Sigma Theta sorority, and married the late Therman O'Daniel. Both taught in schools in Baltimore.
NEWS
September 8, 2003
A toast to long life? It makes sense, according to a study published electronically in the journal Nature recently. Biologists say a natural substance named resveratrol, which occurs in red wine, shows promise in extending life. There already is speculation that red wine helps explain how the French eat a lousy diet yet live to ripe old ages. . . . Red wine has been getting a lot of good press in the last few years, with people touting such things as its antioxidant properties.
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SPORTS
June 29, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
To honor Harvey Pollack's numerical obsession, I really should have counted, or somehow rated, all the readers who responded to last week's obituary for the Sixers' statistics guru. So fascinated were they by the details, the richness, the passions of Pollack's long life that it almost seemed as if this 93-year-old man's obituary were instead his public introduction. Sadly, that's often how it works. For most of us, the only time anyone bothers to construct a narrative of our lives is after we're dead.
NEWS
November 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN ALMETA Scott Bowen cooked, she always included what she believed to be the most important ingredient: love. That undoubtedly was why the meals that emanated from her kitchen always tasted so good. She put a dollop of love in every dish, because Almeta not only loved to cook, she loved the people who sat down at her table, her extended family, friends and neighbors. They got a spiritual jolt with every course. The fact that she lived to 104 was a gift from God, she felt.
SPORTS
April 30, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Jack Ramsay wasn't afraid to swim with the sharks. He didn't seek them out on the long open-water ventures near his Florida home, but fear couldn't keep him from the water, just as fear couldn't prevent anything in a long life of personal and professional accomplishment. Plus, there always seemed to be dolphins that joined him along the way, sharing his joy, following his path, staying near his side. The easy explanation is that Ramsay, who died Monday at the age of 89, had a charmed life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013
Q: Kimberly, who are the healthiest and longest-living people? - Inquiring Mind Wants to Know A: Well, according to the experts, we may live in the wealthiest nation in the world, but the healthiest and longest-living people are in Japan-Okinawa, to be exact. Okinawans have significantly lower incidence rates of heart disease, as well as breast, ovarian and prostate cancer when compared to Americans. They live healthily into their late 80s and 90s. Some experts link Okinawans' long life spans with their diets, rich in grains, fruits and fish.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
AT FIRST, the family of Agnes C. Burke was a little embarrassed to see her outside every day sweeping the sidewalk at 29th and Tasker streets, in Grays Ferry. But they soon realized that the task gave Agnes tremendous satisfaction. Not only was she keeping the neighborhood where she had lived all her life free of what seemed a never-ending accumulation of trash and grit, but she met and communicated with passers-by and made a social occasion of the job. Agnes performed this labor from age 65 to 95, ignoring summer heat or the bitter cold of winter.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Michael D. Schaffer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin R. Delany is one of the most interesting people you've never heard of. He was, over the course of a long life (1812-85), a writer, editor, abolitionist, Harvard medical student, physician, judge, acquaintance of John Brown, and the first African American commissioned a major in the Army. He is also widely considered America's first black nationalist, the forerunner of Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, and Malcolm X. But unless you're a close student of African American history or 19th-century American literature, chances are very good that you don't know much about Delany, who stands in the long shadow cast by Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
DELRAY BEACH, FLA . - It was like in "The Graduate," where aimless Benjamin Braddock was given life advice by Mrs. Robinson's tight-jawed husband. "Plastics," the man said confidently and confidentially. The audience laughed, but screenwriter Buck Henry's advice was actually sound. Around the time the movie came out in 1967 my father was given one-word investment advice by Hy Federman, a vice president of the Amalgamated Bank: "Municipals," said Hy, confidently but not confidentially.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
We've managed to acquire a remarkable family Hanukkah gift: a ship's manifest, an official passenger log that tracks my late mother-in-law's voyage to America in 1920. It's a taproot to family history, part of our clan's collective "Coming to America" story. Had she not made that voyage, nothing would be the same. Hinda Rubache came to these shores and through Ellis Island as a young woman of 22. She sailed from the city of Minsk in Russia, though her immigration papers say Poland because of the ever-changing borders.
NEWS
September 16, 2011
LILLIAN DAVIS O'DANIEL celebrated her 100th birthday on Sept. 1. The West Philadelphia native devoted her long life to education. She died Sept. 8. She lived in West Philadelphia. Lillian was born in Philadelphia when Theodore Roosevelt was president. She was raised in Boston but returned to Philadelphia to attend the University of Pennsylvania, where she received degrees in education. She joined Delta Sigma Theta sorority, and married the late Therman O'Daniel. Both taught in schools in Baltimore.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BERNICE Smith-McDowell felt there was something missing in her life. As she reached her senior years, this woman who had done so much for others through a long life felt a vacancy in her own life. There was a spiritual need that she had not been able to fill at the various churches she had tried. The fulfillment just wasn't there. Then her daughter Patrecea Smith suggested she try her church, True Word Ministry, at 1719 Federal St., South Philadelphia, a little nondenominational church that always seemed to need painting and patching, described by its own pastor as a "hole in the wall.
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