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Long Road

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NEWS
May 2, 1990 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Mooney, an English literature teacher at Father Judge High School, enjoys the theater. A seasonal subscriber at the Walnut Street Theater, the Oxford Circle resident was in the audience recently to view The Hired Man, a British musical playing through Sunday. "The first act was very slow, somewhat monotonous," Mooney, 53, recalled with a laugh last Wednesday. In fact, Mooney said, he was busying himself looking through the playbill, waiting for intermission, when he spotted the name of the lead actor, James J. Mellon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013
By Joseph Minardi Schiffer Publishing. 272 pp. $50 Reviewed by Judy Hill More than once, wobbling on a bicycle atop the uneven cobblestones of Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill, I've cursed the irregular surface, wishing for smooth, predictable asphalt. According to Joseph Minardi's new history of Northwest Philadelphia, I have little to grumble about. Compared with the 1700s at least, when Germantown Avenue was known as "the worst road in America. " Wagons routinely became mired in deep mud, and horses were so badly injured after the six-mile trek from Center City to Germantown that they frequently had to be put down.
SPORTS
January 29, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
ARLINGTON, Va. - He was smiling. He was joking. On the ice, in the dressing room, with teammates, and, yes, even with media - even with me. Mike Richards is happy to be back in hockey, so happy that he could greet an old critic with a welcoming smile and a long conversation about the status of his game, even as he still faces an oh-so-uncertain path to his future. "My legs are good," he said after a brief pregame skate at the Washington Capitals' practice facility before Wednesday night's game against the Flyers.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
The road back. As Gar Schoener spoke about his recovery from heart surgery Monday, that phrase came up several times. In January, it had been nothing but the road ahead for Schoener, a Lansdowne man who had big plans to enter the Penn Relays and the 1991 Delaware County Senior Olympics. He had won two events and placed second and third in two other events in the 1990 event, and he was an irrepressible tennis player and bowler. At 75, he was feeling like a dynamo. But in February, after a routine stress test, Schoener, who turns 76 today, was told that his heart was not functioning properly.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2002 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Also in this column: No longer on hold. Fannie Mae buys bonds. Here's a new economic indicator: The average waiting time for a restaurant table on Friday nights at a dozen popular "casual-dining" chains has dropped from half an hour in mid-February to 18 minutes last week, according to a weekly survey by Wachovia Securities analyst Jeff Omohundro and his team. Does that mean people have cut back on eating out? Or that, as unemployment rises, Olive Garden and LongHorn Steakhouse have been able to find more cheap labor to bus tables and wash plates?
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When the world is introduced to a talent as bold as Brittany Howard, things happen fast. That was the case when the Alabama Shakes first came to music fans' attention. The Athens, Ala., rock and soul band, fronted by the powerhouse vocalist, headline the Mann Center for the Performing Arts Thursday night behind its stellar new album, Sound & Color .   After being spotted and talked up in 2011 by Patterson Hood of roots-rock band Drive-By Truckers - who are opening up for the Shakes at the Mann - the Shakes became an instant blog buzz act and the first band to be featured on Austin City Limits before their debut album, Boys & Girls , was even released.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | New York Daily News
The jogger gang-raped by teen-agers in Central Park last month has taken her first shaky steps from her hospital bed and is now able to write her name, doctors disclosed yesterday. However, they said the woman was still in "fragile condition," occasionally runs a fever, and was not well-oriented to time and place. "She is now able to take a few walking steps, although her gait is still broad-based and unsteady," said Dr. Robert Kurtz, director of the surgical intensive care unit at Metropolitan Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Mainly, Joe Ely's always wanted to hit the road. "I left my home out on the Great High Plains/And headed for some new terrain," was the first line of "I Had My Hopes Up High," the first tune on his first album. Fifteen years on, he hasn't left off looking. On "Grandfather's Blues" on his last studio album, Dig All Night, he's caught thinking: "All this makes me wonder/What they'll say about me?/Aw, he's just some fool rambler/Dyin' to be free. " One afternoon last month, Ely sat still in the Rittenhouse Hotel long enough to spin a few yarns of the road, and promote his appearance tonight at the Theater of Living Arts as one-fifth of the Marlboro Music "Songwriters' Night," which in addition to Ely, features Lyle Lovett, John Hiatt, Guy Clark and newly added guest Robert Earl Keen Jr. It was 4 o'clock and Ely - whose closest brush with a hit was a 1981 gutsy rocker called "Hard Livin"' ("I wish hard livin' didn't come so easy to me")
NEWS
October 9, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Teddy Pendergrass has a ready answer for the inevitable questions about how he managed to sing again, after the spinal-cord injury that he suffered in a 1982 auto accident left him paralyzed from the waist down: "Don't analyze it. Just listen. Enjoy the ride. " The quintessential Quiet Storm crooner, one of the leading stars of the '70s Philly soul explosion, is sitting in the sunlit living room of his sprawling Penn Valley home. Surrounded by portraits of himself and fine sculpture, he's insistent on this point: He will share only certain details about his long road back to the stage - a comeback that continues with shows Saturday and Sunday at the Keswick Theatre.
NEWS
August 13, 2016
By Sally Friedman In the short space of a couple of weeks, I watched as a radiant young bride floated down the aisle to her groom - and as two women I admire said goodbye to their husbands in different ways. Life's contrasts, for sure. One wife lost her husband to illness after a long marriage. The other had the ultimate pain of placing her husband in a care facility because his Alzheimer's had become unmanageable at home. And then there was that wedding, drenched in the sweetness of young love.
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NEWS
August 13, 2016
By Sally Friedman In the short space of a couple of weeks, I watched as a radiant young bride floated down the aisle to her groom - and as two women I admire said goodbye to their husbands in different ways. Life's contrasts, for sure. One wife lost her husband to illness after a long marriage. The other had the ultimate pain of placing her husband in a care facility because his Alzheimer's had become unmanageable at home. And then there was that wedding, drenched in the sweetness of young love.
SPORTS
July 28, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Update: The Eagles released linebacker Travis Long Wednesday morning. From Tuesday: Travis Long fell to the ground on a football field Tuesday, and for once, this was a good thing. The Eagles were in the midst of seven-on-seven drills during their second day of training camp, and playing outside linebacker, Long dropped back to cover a receiver, McLeod Bethel-Thompson, running a seam route. Chase Daniel threw a perfect pass to Bethel-Thompson, but Long dived, sending his 6-foot-4, 255-pound body arrow-like into the air, to bat the ball down and break up a potential completion.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | Michael Vitez, For The Inquirer
Three weeks after the crash of Amtrak Train 188, Aaron Levine, 80, woke up in Temple University Hospital's intensive care unit. He was on a ventilator. He had nine broken ribs, which had punctured his right lung, collapsing it. The area around his lung had filled with blood. He took so long to wake up, doctors had worried about brain injury. Unable to speak because of the breathing tube, he mouthed the words to family, nurses, doctors, everyone: "Let me die. " Levine, one of 238 passengers, was a personal-injury lawyer who lived in Washington.
SPORTS
March 15, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, Staff Writer
TAMPA, Fla. - Once a surgeon repaired the torn extensor carpi ulnaris retinaculum in Mark Teixeira's right wrist, the Yankees first baseman was optimistic. Doctors told Teixeira he would rest for four or five months and be 100 percent healed at six months - the same timetable offered for Phillies outfielder Aaron Altherr, who underwent the surgery last week. "Hah," Teixeira said Sunday morning from his locker at George M. Steinbrenner Field. "No chance. No chance. " The 35-year-old slugger recalled the times after his July 1, 2013, surgery as some of the worst, a warning of what possibly lies ahead for Altherr, a young player the Phillies planned to learn more about in 2016.
SPORTS
January 29, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
ARLINGTON, Va. - He was smiling. He was joking. On the ice, in the dressing room, with teammates, and, yes, even with media - even with me. Mike Richards is happy to be back in hockey, so happy that he could greet an old critic with a welcoming smile and a long conversation about the status of his game, even as he still faces an oh-so-uncertain path to his future. "My legs are good," he said after a brief pregame skate at the Washington Capitals' practice facility before Wednesday night's game against the Flyers.
SPORTS
October 23, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
ALL NICK SHARGA wanted to do was play Division I football. Then life's hard knocks got in the way. So he was forced to take a detour. And even he didn't know how it would play out. But for him, there really wasn't an option. Not if he wanted to follow his dream. "That was my goal, so I was determined," Sharga recalled. "But there was a point where everything kind of went downhill. And really, I had no idea what I was going to do. " The untimely event, as he refers to it, was tearing an anterior cruciate ligament in the first game of his senior season at Northampton High School near Allentown, where he was a linebacker and tight end. It was a non-contact injury, which only made it harder to digest.
SPORTS
October 9, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Flyers open their schedule Thursday night in Tampa and right up until the last moments of their preparations, absolutely no one connected to the organization uttered the "R" word concerning the regular season ahead. "My expectation is not only to make the playoffs, but to hopefully make a run. Otherwise, what do we play for?" forward Jakub Voracek said after practice on Wednesday, just before the team boarded the plane for Florida. "Obviously, we have some young guys coming up, but I don't think this team is rebuilding.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When the world is introduced to a talent as bold as Brittany Howard, things happen fast. That was the case when the Alabama Shakes first came to music fans' attention. The Athens, Ala., rock and soul band, fronted by the powerhouse vocalist, headline the Mann Center for the Performing Arts Thursday night behind its stellar new album, Sound & Color .   After being spotted and talked up in 2011 by Patterson Hood of roots-rock band Drive-By Truckers - who are opening up for the Shakes at the Mann - the Shakes became an instant blog buzz act and the first band to be featured on Austin City Limits before their debut album, Boys & Girls , was even released.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been a long journey to the priesthood for the Rev. James J. Grogan. He comes from a family that has produced about 15 priests in Ireland and the United States over the last century. But becoming a priest seemed unlikely for Grogan until fate and a call from God changed his direction. He was married and has three adult sons. A permanent deacon for nine years, he was ordained last month as a priest along with four others by Trenton Diocese Bishop David M. O'Connell. Grogan, 58, officially assumed his duties on July 1 at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church in Moorestown, the parish that has been his family's spiritual home for three decades and where his children attended parochial school.
SPORTS
February 27, 2015 | BY HOWARD HERMAN, For the Daily News
AMHERST, Mass. - The last time Phil Martelli's Saint Joseph's Hawks won a road game, they hadn't even unwrapped their Christmas presents. Last night, DeAndre' Bembry gifted the Hawks a career-high scoring performance and a big Atlantic 10 Conference win over the University of Massachusetts. Bembry had a career-best 33 points to go with 14 rebounds and four assists as the Hawks ended a nine-game road losing streak, and a three-game overall skid, with an 82-71 win over UMass.
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