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Longevity

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NEWS
September 24, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Kathy Sheehan contributed to this report
He's a great salesman, but it seems Mayor Rendell got a little carried away last night pitching the labor contract he's imposing on city workers. Although the city's plan calls for a two-year wage freeze, followed by inceases of 2 percent and 3 percent in years three and four, Rendell asserted that the deal would amount to a 13 percent wage boost over four years. Huh? "Remember, as city workers well know," Rendell said last night, "that anyone who's worked for the city for longer than three years receives each and every year a longevity bump, which is in most cases the equivalent of about 2 percent.
NEWS
January 7, 2004
While no human is known to have lived more than 122 years, researchers envision a day in which 150 is not unreachable. The most ambitious microbiologists aren't satisfied with that; a few have whispered the belief that human cells - the building blocks of our bodies - can be coaxed and kept alive for, oh, maybe 500 years. The mind boggles. Mick Jagger performing at 60 is one thing. Imagine him performing at 460 - for ancient concertgoers whose oldies collections would include Chubby Checker, the Partridge Family and Eminem.
SPORTS
March 31, 2011 | 'By Daniel I. Dorfman, For The Inquirer
The Nolan Ryan biography has so many amazing parts. The 324 wins, the 5,714 strikeouts, the seven no-hitters, and the 12 one-hitters. But one part of his career almost defies logic: his durability. From 1971 to 1992 - when he was 45 years old - the pitcher dubbed "The Ryan Express" started at least 26 games every season with the exception of the strike-shortened 1981 campaign. And that was despite shoulder surgery after the 1975 season. It was even more remarkable considering Ryan was not a knuckleballer or a soft tosser but instead threw 100 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In union bargaining, there is one standing rule: Once the local gets a concession, you can't well ask the workers to give it back later. This month, local officials are preparing to do just that. With layoffs, across-the-board cuts, and a budget free of a tax increase behind them, officials are making noise about holding the line on salaries this year as they negotiate the three union contracts that expired at the end of December. Several months into the bargaining, battle lines appear to be drawn on one sensitive issue: longevity pay. Union rank-and-file say the additional stipends - in some cases as high as 9 percent of annual wages - separate more experienced workers from newcomers.
NEWS
October 29, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON CORTES
Mamie Edwards, 103, was among Care Pavilion Choir members who sang yesterday at the 20th anniversary celebration of the Center for Advocacy for the Rights and Interests of the Elderly at the Doubletree Hotel. Of her longevity, Edwards said: "Ain't no secret. The Lord has taken care of me. "
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
When Mayor Rendell went on television to describe his five-year plan, he said it called for a four-year wage freeze for city workers. In fact, he wants a pay cut. Many City Council members and city union leaders are just now learning that Rendell's budget calls for rolling back the wages of most city workers. The plan calls for elimination of "longevity payments," increases workers get for staying with the city for given numbers of years. While most assumed that proposal meant scrapping future longevity raises, it turns out that the administration's plan is to eliminate past increases as well.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
Cherry Hill officials announced Thursday that the township had reached a deal with its police union after almost 18 months of negotiations. Under the four-year contract, police will contribute 1.5 percent of their salaries toward health care and will forgo longevity raises. They will receive annual cost-of-living increases averaging 1.6 percent. - James Osborne  
NEWS
May 14, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some credited their parents and "good genes. " Others said it was the grace of God. But Frank Berman, age 101, attributed his longevity to another factor. "You don't worry. . . . It doesn't help," said Berman, who retired as a photo engraver at The Inquirer in 1975. Berman was among nearly 100 people age 100 and older attending Philadelphia's 11th annual Centenarian Celebration Luncheon on Friday. The event, whose host was Mayor Nutter, was held at Penn's Landing Caterers/Sheet Metal Workers Union Hall on Columbus Boulevard.
NEWS
December 7, 1993
SOME HEALTHY COUNTRIES DO MORE WITH LESS The good news is that trends in life expectancy are reversible: Countries can increase the longevity of their people simply by the choices they make about using the resources they have. Though citizens of richer countries tend to live longer, it is not wealth per se that brings longevity, but rather the services that wealth can buy. Rich or poor, the countries that have higher longevity rates are generally those that use the money they do have to provide sanitation, nutrition, immunizations, education and other basic services.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just weeks after a Collingdale shopkeeper was shot to death and robbed of $10,000, officials are urging the borough's businesses to use a police escort service when transporting money. At a Borough Council meeting Monday, Councilman James J. Powers said he had spoken to members of the Collingdale Business and Professional Association after the shooting about using the service when they deposited or withdrew large sums of money from the bank. "There needs to be an awareness of basic security measures," Powers said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
In the midst of all the crime-fighting superheroes, time-traveling aliens, and walking dead who will populate the 15th annual Wizard World Comic Con this weekend, Burt Reynolds may seem somewhat out of place. But if remaining an icon for more than four decades armed with nothing more than a lady-killing smirk, a machismo-emitting mustache, and a death-defying Trans Am isn't a superpower worthy of Wizard World, then what is? The Convention Center will be filled for the next three days with appearances by a host of pop-culture celebrities, from actors to comic book artists and writers to professional wrestlers to rock stars.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - If you're 65 and living in Hawaii, here's some good news: Odds are you'll live another 21 years. And for all but five of those years, you'll likely be in pretty good health. Hawaii tops the charts in the government's first state-by-state look at how long Americans age 65 can expect to live, on average, and how many of the remaining years will be healthy ones. Retirement-age Mississippians fared worst, with about 171/2 more years remaining and nearly seven of them in poorer health.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By David Brown, Washington Post
You, hear me! Give this fire to that old man. Pull the black worm off the bark and give it to the mother. And no spitting in the ashes! It's an odd little speech. But if it were spoken clearly to a band of hunter-gatherers in the Caucasus 15,000 years ago, there's a good chance the listeners would know what you were saying. That's because all of the nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in the four sentences are words that have descended largely unchanged from a language that died out as the glaciers were retreating at the end of the last Ice Age. The traditional view is that words can't survive for more than 8,000 to 9,000 years.
SPORTS
February 15, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a job in which instability is often a defining feature, Ted Williams clearly has bucked the trend with the Eagles. From Ray Rhodes to Andy Reid and now Chip Kelly, Williams is working for his third Eagles head coach, a record 19th season with the team as an assistant coach. Things are coming full circle for the 69-year-old Williams. He began his career as the Eagles tight ends coach. After two seasons, he switched to coaching running backs, a job he held for the last 16 years.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Scientists have been hard-pressed to explain why menopause happens so early in humans - there's no obvious evolutionary advantage to having your reproductive system shut down decades before the rest of your body. Most other long-lived animals keep reproducing until the end. Female turtles can lay fertile eggs at 100. Our primate relatives, too, keep bearing young until they are near death. Now, scientists are finding clues to our unusual life pattern in killer whales - one of the few other species in which females get decades of so-called postreproductive life.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | THE WASHINGTON POST
IN A LONG-AWAITED study, underfed monkeys didn't have longer life spans, raising doubts that severe calorie restriction could result in extended lives for most animals and possibly humans. In research going back more than 75 years, a sharp reduction in caloric intake has been associated with increased longevity. The initial work was done with mice and rats but was later corroborated in other laboratory subjects such as fruit flies and worms, raising hopes that it would apply to humans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
ZOE STRAUSS is known as Philadelphia's pre-eminent street photographer, complete with a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art that runs through April 22. But she's also a major Bruce Springsteen fan. In fact, on March 4, Strauss will discuss the influence of Springsteen's music on her own work and life at the museum. The connection between Strauss and Springsteen makes sense. Both (especially early Springsteen) champion the working class, shining a light on communities that are not in the forefront of the American conscience.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
CAMBRIDGE, England - British scientist Stephen Hawking has decoded some of the most puzzling mysteries of the universe, but he has left one mystery unsolved: how he has managed to survive so long with such a crippling disease. The physicist and cosmologist was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease when he was a 21-year-old student at Cambridge University. Most people die within a few years of the diagnosis, called motor neurone disease in the United Kingdom. On Sunday, Hawking will turn 70. "I don't know of anyone who's survived this long," said Ammar al-Chalabi, director of the Motor Neurone Disease Care and Research Centre at King's College London.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2011 | By Dave Carpenter, Associated Press
Odds are growing that you'll live past 85. But will your money last that long? What if you make it to 100? With life spans lengthening, those nearing retirement may want to consider financial protection against the possibility of outliving their cash. It is now increasingly available in the form of longevity insurance, which usually involves giving a sum of money to an insurer when you are in your 60s in exchange for monthly payments that start at 80 or 85 and continue for the rest of your life.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
Cherry Hill officials announced Thursday that the township had reached a deal with its police union after almost 18 months of negotiations. Under the four-year contract, police will contribute 1.5 percent of their salaries toward health care and will forgo longevity raises. They will receive annual cost-of-living increases averaging 1.6 percent. - James Osborne  
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