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Longshoremen

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NEWS
September 30, 1986 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Your ship may come in tomorrow, but don't look for it to be unloaded if a new labor contract is not worked out between the Philadelphia Marine Trade Association and five longshoremen unions. The contract with the five locals representing 2,500 Philadelphia dock workers expires at midnight tonight, and neither side appears optimistic about prospects for a settlement. "Right now, it does look like it will happen," Thomas P. Kelly, PMTA president, said yesterday afternoon. Kelly said talks broke down earlier this month and no new bargaining sessions are scheduled.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1993 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're tired of being called pirates and getting blamed for the decline of Philadelphia ports. They're tired of what looks and feels to them like management greed and incompetence on the waterfront. But they're not all that interested in figuring out who did what, back when. Indeed, they're tired of finger-pointing, too. These aren't union bosses talking. They're just four rank-and-file guys sitting around a living room, drinking tea and coffee - and worrying. They're longshoremen, as their fathers were, and they're proud of it. They believe they do better work than their counterparts in other ports.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas J. Holt's growing waterfront empire got even bigger yesterday when he took over the assets of Independent Pier Co., a stevedoring firm run by the Meyle family since 1876. The purchase extends Holt's marine-cargo operations to Northeast Philadelphia's Tioga Fruit Terminal. Holt, using Independent's former employees, unloaded the Chilean fruit vessel Chaiten there yesterday. Holt acquired Independent Pier's assets and contract with the Chilean Lines subsidiary that leases and operates the terminal.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | By Richard Jones, Sergio R. Bustos and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Denise-Marie Santiago contributed to this article
Customs officials unlocked the doors of a rust-colored cargo container. Hundreds of pounds of coffee beans gushed out onto the docks. An overpowering stench filled the air. And what was left of the live cargo stumbled weakly out. The gaunt young stowaway fell into the arms of stunned longshoremen at the Tioga Marine Terminal. He was barely alive and his three companions were dead after a nine-day voyage from Colombia to the United States, locked inside a 20-foot long cargo container filled with coffee beans.
NEWS
December 29, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A strike that might have begun as early as this weekend at 14 ports on the East and Gulf Coasts has been averted for 30 days while negotiations continue. The union representing 14,500 dockworkers, including Philadelphia, and management for shipping lines and port employers agreed to extend their contract talks until late January, a federal mediator announced Friday. The International Longshoremen's Association (ILA) had been preparing for a possible strike at 12:01 a.m. Sunday, affecting ports between Maine and Texas.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
More than 600 tattoo "artists" from around the world met this weekend at the Holiday Inn, 18th and Market streets, to discuss and show off their bodily works of expression at the 11th annual convention of the National Tattoo Association. "Up until about 12 years ago, a tattoo was taboo," said Philadelphia Eddie Funk, host of the convention. "People thought the only ones with tattoos were people in jail, motorcycle gangs, truck drivers, longshoremen and rugged seamen. Today, people with tattoos come from every walk of life.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1989 | By Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Two card games in a dark, grimy, longshoremen's hiring hall in South Philadelphia was where the only money could be found for about a dozen dockworkers yesterday. Normally, they'd be making about $18-an-hour unloading cases of imported Chilean fruit. But those jobs came to a sudden halt Monday night, when the federal Food and Drug Administration impounded Chilean fruit following the discovery of two poisoned grapes. As a result, 110 dockworkers left the hiring hall at International Longshoremen's Association Local 1291 without work yesterday morning.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1993 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The longshoremen said yes . . . in a big way. By an 821-to-395 vote, members of the International Longshoreman's Association (ILA) yesterday agreed to pay and work-rule concessions the union leadership and port employers say are critical to saving ILA jobs and business at the Philadelphia port. The concessions were exactly the same as what were voted down by a 41-vote margin on Monday and Tuesday. But this time, not only did the amendments win by 426 votes, 109 more members participated in the election.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun shone brightly Tuesday on the M/V Freedom as longshoremen unloaded 258 pieces of military cargo, including 33 helicopters, returning from Afghanistan through the Port of Philadelphia and bound for Fort Drum, N.Y. The ship was the sixth since 2009 that stopped here before heading to, or returning from, Iraq and Afghanistan. "There will be other units redeploying through the port, especially as we draw down further in Afghanistan and Iraq," said Mitch Chandran, public affairs spokesman for the Department of the Army, who was at Packer Avenue Marine Terminal for the unloading.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A strike that might have begun as early as this weekend at 14 ports on the East and Gulf Coasts has been averted for 30 days while negotiations continue. The union representing 14,500 dockworkers, including in Philadelphia, and management for shipping lines and port employers agreed to extend their contract talks until late January, a federal mediator announced Friday. The International Longshoremen's Association (ILA) had been preparing for a possible strike at 12:01 a.m. Sunday, affecting ports between Maine and Texas.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The union representing 14,500 dockworkers in East and Gulf Coasts ports, including Philadelphia, and management for shipping lines and port employers are lurching toward a possible crippling strike next week. Negotiations between the International Longshoremen's Association (ILA) and employers represented by the U.S. Marine Alliance broke off Tuesday. If the stalemate is not resolved, workers between Maine and Texas could walk off the job Dec. 30. The bargaining is for a new master contract governing containerized cargoes - commodities shipped in 20- or 40-foot containers.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Terry Collins, Associated Press
OAKLAND, Calif. - Thousands of Occupy Wall Street protesters blocked cargo trucks at some of the West Coast's busiest ports Monday. The protests stretched from San Diego to Anchorage, Alaska, brought work to a standstill in Oakland, Calif., and Longview, Wash., and led to the closure of a major marine terminal in Portland, Ore. Organizers declared victory and promised more demonstrations to come. "The truckers are still here, but there's nobody here to unload their stuff," protest organizer Boots Riley said.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun shone brightly Tuesday on the M/V Freedom as longshoremen unloaded 258 pieces of military cargo, including 33 helicopters, returning from Afghanistan through the Port of Philadelphia and bound for Fort Drum, N.Y. The ship was the sixth since 2009 that stopped here before heading to, or returning from, Iraq and Afghanistan. "There will be other units redeploying through the port, especially as we draw down further in Afghanistan and Iraq," said Mitch Chandran, public affairs spokesman for the Department of the Army, who was at Packer Avenue Marine Terminal for the unloading.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2010 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Placard-waving longshoremen urged the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority on Wednesday to hold to a strict Oct. 24 deadline for getting a cargo crane and the Del Monte Fresh Produce Co. ship deliveries moved back from Gloucester City to docks in South Philadelphia. Packer Avenue Marine Terminal operator Astro Holdings Inc. and its president, Thomas Holt Jr., have asked for a 120-day extension - from receipt of a Sept. 24 letter - to respond and work cooperatively with the PRPA "through whatever concerns and issues they may have," Holt said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2010 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Longshoremen on Wednesday announced an end to their work stoppage that idled ships for two days at the Port of New York and New Jersey and at Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia. "It is anticipated that as soon as the pickets leave, normal operations will resume," the International Longshoremen's Association said in an afternoon statement. The situation that precipitated the stoppage "has not been resolved," but ILA members were to return to work at 7 p.m. Wednesday, the New York Shipping Association said.
NEWS
February 26, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A longtime dockworker died in a Camden port accident early yesterday. Crane operator Krzystof A. Zarotynski, 57, was standing on a dock at the Beckett Street Terminal about 6 a.m. when the accident occurred, Joseph Balzano, executive director of the South Jersey Port Corp., said in a statement. Zarotynski was standing below the crane, said Jay Jones, deputy executive director of the Port Corp. It was a routine day, and crews were readying the crane with a container spreader, a device that allows them to unload 20- and 40-foot containers from ships.
NEWS
December 5, 2006 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City planners say redevelopment invariably falters unless stakeholders agree to "buy in. " It's not the public's pocketbook they are after; it's the more precious commodities: hearts and minds. As the 45-member Central Delaware Waterfront Advisory Group presses forward with its study for a revamped Philadelphia waterfront on the seven-mile stretch from Allegheny to Oregon Avenues, the $1.6 million study, funded by the William Penn Foundation, is scheduled to be completed next year.
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