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NEWS
October 9, 2011
More than a year after it became a hot campaign issue in the race for Pennsylvania governor, it's even more critical that Harrisburg lawmakers close the so-called Florida loophole that lets Philadelphia gun owners skirt the city's strict handgun-carrying rules. With a renewed push in Congress to nationalize concealed-weapon permits so that any state-issued handgun permit would be valid across the country, the public-safety stakes could loom even larger. As many as 900 city residents - more per capita than in any other among the nation's 10 largest cities - are now packing heat in Philadelphia by virtue of mail-order permits issued by Florida.
NEWS
January 31, 1990
The trouble with singling out a few hundred well-to-do condominium buyers for a five-year holiday on property taxes is that other rich people somehow get it into their heads that they'd like the same deal. That's come home to roost now that several condominium developers have applied for an estimated $20 million in tax abatements under a 1988 law that was designed to help just one, ailing project on Rittenhouse Square. It was a blunder when the Goode administration and a unanimous City Council approved the 1988 tax break for the Rittenhouse, a combined hotel and condominium project that had been stalled for 15 years.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Theresa Sullivan Barger, Special to The Inquirer
The Springfield Township Board of Commissioners is considering an amendment to its real estate transfer-tax ordinance that would close a loophole that has allowed a few people to avoid paying tax on property exchanges. At its meeting Wednesday night, the commissioners read the proposed amendment, which would allow collection of the 2 percent transfer tax even if the deed to a property was not technically transferred. One percent is distributed to the county, and the township and the school district each receive 0.5 percent.
NEWS
April 15, 2010 | By Megan DeSmedt
Many of us have been scrambling to get our taxes filed on time. Of course, some (like my dad) filed months ago, and others (like me) filed this week. Grumble as we may, we all know we have to file by April 15. But while we pay our fair share to sustain schools, parks, libraries, and police departments, the majority of companies that do business in Pennsylvania won't pay any state income tax. That's right: A mind-boggling 71 percent of corporations that do business in Pennsylvania don't pay state income tax at all, according to the state Department of Revenue.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The days when a Pennsylvania resident can legally carry a concealed firearm using a Florida permit appear to be coming to an end. "The Florida loophole is officially closed in the state of Pennsylvania," Attorney General Kathleen Kane said Friday as she stood beside Mayor Nutter and other city leaders in North Philadelphia. Her words drew cheers from the crowd but were received less warmly among Republicans in Harrisburg. Since September 2001, Pennsylvania and Florida have had a reciprocity agreement that required Pennsylvania to recognize all of Florida's concealed-carry permits.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Even when they attend conferences as officers of legislative organizations, Pennsylvania lawmakers must disclose who pays for their travel, lodging and hospitality, the State Ethics Commission ruled yesterday. Acting on a request by Rep. Fred Noye (R., Perry), the commission ruled 5-1 that legislators must follow provisions of the Ethics Act requiring the reporting of the items when they total more than $500 at one time. Noye is about to become national chairman of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The car tools into Sea Bright, a small sliver of land between river and ocean, with Anthony "Doc" Villane pointing out the sights: Beach club. Restaurant. Condominium. Condominium. Home. Home. Home. Condominium. That used to be a playing field, Villane says, pulling into the parking lot of one of the condominium developments. And over there, he points down and across the street, is where "they built right up on the water, right next to it. " On summer weekends, he says, the cars on Ocean Avenue, the town's main thoroughfare, slow to a crawl.
NEWS
August 14, 1991
There's a hullabaloo in Harrisburg over $47 million - a pittance when you're raising taxes by $3.3 billion, but real money nonetheless. Before signing the spending and tax bills, Gov. Casey complained that the package was out of balance by said $47 million, thanks largely to some eleventh-hour tax breaks for special interests, and so he deleted that much in spending. Key legislators complain that Mr. Casey misled them into believing that he'd accept their budget package in full, while administration officials say it ain't so. Since there are some prickly personalities in this tiff, all sides might benefit from some time at the Shore.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | By I. F. Stone
One evil uncovered by the Iran-contra hearings was the "privatization" of U.S. foreign policy by farming out covert projects to outside entrepreneurs and organizations. But an obscure provision in a presidential order of March 31, issued supposedly to reform covert activities, actually gives explicit authorization, for the first time, to such privatization. The order was billed as an implementation of a Tower commission recommendation. But in fact it seizes upon a narrow loophole in the wording of the report by the investigating panel chaired by former Sen. John Tower (R., Texas)
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
SEVERAL Philadelphia gun owners with nonresident permits from Florida to carry a concealed weapon say that when state Attorney General Kathleen Kane announced Friday that she was closing the so-called Florida gun loophole she also should have promised to look at why so many Philadelphians sought permits from Florida in the first place. "The only place that this seems to become an issue, which they are not saying, is in Philadelphia," said firearms instructor Richard Oliver. "It's just a Philly problem, because to get the Philadelphia permit is so crazy.
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