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Lord S Resistance Army

NEWS
March 26, 2004 | By Carolyn Davis
That's it. I've had it. I'm fed up with seeing children around the world treated as though they were little more than empty cans to be kicked or crushed. It was a photograph in yesterday's Inquirer, amplified by a series of photos on the New York Times front page, that pushed me beyond fury. A 16-year-old Palestinian boy approaches an Israeli checkpoint in the West Bank with something bulky underneath his sweater. It's a suicide bombers' vest. Israeli soldiers help him to take it off via a robot, then make him strip to his skivvies to be sure he doesn't have another weapon.
NEWS
February 23, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Nearly 200 Uganda refugees die when rebels torch camp Scores of rebels armed with assault rifles, mortars and rocket-propelled grenades attacked a refugee camp of in northern Uganda and torched mud-and-grass huts, killing 192 people and wounding dozens more. Saturday evening's attack on Barloonyo camp in Lira district was blamed by local officials on the Lord's Resistance Army, a shadowy rebel group that has been fighting the Ugandan government for 17 years. Dr. Jane Aceng, head of Lira hospital, said 56 people were taken to the hospital with burns and shrapnel and gunshot wounds.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The days begin to blur together after more than a week on the road. "Tomorrow is Sunday?" Francis Kuria, the Kenyan driver who is hauling a load of American relief food, said yesterday. He looked shocked. His 21-year-old son, James, the assistant on the truck, had mistakenly told him it was Sunday. James shrugged at his error. Not that it mattered much. There are no days off for a long-haul driver, except those imposed by customs delays and mechanical failures. Kuria was only concerned because he was nearing the end of his trek and he thinks he won't be able to unload his cargo on a Sunday.
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christine Akullu had written off her son as dead three years ago after he was kidnapped by the Lord's Resistance Army, a cruel and incomprehensible guerrilla organization that operates in northern Uganda. It was a reasonable assumption. Many of the children the rebels abduct to work as soldiers, porters or sex slaves end up dead - beaten or worked to death by a guerrilla group whose aims are as murky as its theology. But yesterday, Akullu saw with her own eyes that her son, Alfred Okwonga, was alive.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The rebels shot through the doors and began running through the halls, darting in and out of rooms, grabbing screaming girls and dragging them outside where they were herded together. Then they went back into the building for more. Sister Mary Rose Atuu opened a window and pushed girls through and then leapt out herself, landing on the ground, breaking her leg. She hobbled into a bush, shushing the girls and pulling them to her. For days they hid in the bush, finding shelter in chicken coops on surrounding farms.
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