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NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By P. Solomon Banda and Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press
LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - A wildfire burning near the desert birthplace of the atomic bomb advanced on the Los Alamos laboratory and thousands of outdoor drums of plutonium-contaminated waste Tuesday as authorities stepped up efforts to protect the site and monitor the air for radiation. Officials at the nation's premier nuclear weapons lab gave assurances that dangerous materials were safely stored and capable of withstanding flames from the 93-square-mile fire, which as of midday was as close as 50 feet from the grounds.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Charlene Mires, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly a half century ago, the nation's deepest secrets were wedged here in a deep Tennessee valley, fenced in atop a high mesa in New Mexico and settled on the banks of the Columbia River in Washington state. Then, travelers wouldn't have found these towns on maps. Even the people who moved in the 1940s to Oak Ridge, to Los Alamos, N.M., and to Hanford, Wash., to work for the government were pledged to secrecy. Then, they shared a common mission. Now, they share a common legacy: The atomic bomb.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
Former Brown University president Donald Hornig, 92, who worked on the atomic bomb and was a scientific adviser to three U.S. presidents, died Monday, Jan. 21, said a university spokesman. Mr. Hornig, a Harvard-trained chemist, worked on the atomic bomb at Los Alamos, N.M., before becoming a professor at Brown in 1946, the university said. He also taught at Princeton. The school said he advised Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Hornig, Brown president from 1970 to 1976, inherited a university with an annual deficit of more than $4 million, leading him to institute an austerity plan that deeply cut the deficit.
NEWS
May 12, 2000
I think the [National] Park Service should compensate the residents for this disaster. It does not seem like enough thought was put into the possible outcomes. People generally want more prescribed burning on public lands. Think this one through. More prescribed burning means burning under riskier conditions. There are only so many "safe" days in a year, and you can't do it all on those few days. If you want zero risk, expect less prescribed burning. If you want more prescribed burning, expect risk.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
Petraeus wins vote to lead CIA WASHINGTON - The Senate unanimously confirmed Gen. David H. Petraeus as director of the CIA, turning over the nation's intelligence operations to the man credited with turning back insurgencies in Iraq. The nomination of Petraeus, the top commander of the war effort in Afghanistan, was approved by a 94-0 vote. Petraeus will replace Leon E. Panetta, whose appointment as secretary of defense sailed through the Senate last week. Petraeus is to retire from his current post in late July and take over at the CIA after a transition period.
NEWS
June 24, 2010
Nuclear physicist Joan Hinton, 88, labeled "the Atom Spy Who Got Away" during the anticommunist hysteria of early 1950s America for moving to China in 1948, died June 8 in Beijing. A spokesman for the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Mechanization, which Ms. Hinton had worked with since 1979, made the announcement. Recruited at 22 for the Manhattan Project to help develop the atomic bomb, she was so repulsed when the United States dropped it on Japan in World War II that she went to China, where she embraced Maoism and ran a dairy farm for much of the rest of her life.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A half-century ago, a tall, storklike figure with a porkpie hat on his head and a pipe in his teeth stepped from the train at a lonely station in the desert of New Mexico. He was J. Robert Oppenheimer, a brilliant, ego-driven physicist on loan from the University of California, Berkeley, to direct scientific work on the most secret and ambitious endeavor of World War II. It was March 1943 - a desperate moment in American history. The Army was fighting in North Africa and New Guinea.
NEWS
August 6, 1995
THE MORAL IMPERATIVE TO BUILD THE BOMB I have no doubts my father was involved in a righteous cause. In a dim way, I even envy him: What could be more exhilarating than to know that the fate of the world rests on your work - and that you are fighting the good fight? Nor did my father have any doubts. "There are a lot of things to go to hell for, but working on the bomb isn't one of them," he would say, bristling, when the morality of working at Los Alamos came up. The Fascists and Nazis had stripped him of his position, driven him from his homeland.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | By Edward Teller
Leaks of information on the highly important topic of nuclear weapons have been discussed widely. While I am not familiar with all the details, I can make a comparison with an important event half a century ago. At that time the most important information was leaked to the Soviet Union by, among others, Klaus Fuchs. This speeded up Soviet research maybe by three years, maybe by 20 years. I shall make two comparisons: One is to the events, the second is to our responses to the events.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George J. Crits, 92, of Ardmore, an expert in the field of water and wastewater treatment, died Thursday, March 27, at his home of causes related to aging. Mr. Crits was renowned in the industry for his expertise in ion exchange technology. Ion exchange is used to soften water and separate out unwanted elements. Mr. Crits wrote three books on the subject, the last of which was published in 2012. It was titled Crits Notes on Water and Ion Exchange . Bill Runyan, president of Idreco USA Ltd., a water treatment company in West Chester, called Crits Notes "the Bible of water treatment.
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NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  After completing his military obligation in the late 1940s, John M. Caughey "spent some time traveling around the Mediterranean and wound up teaching at the American University in Cairo," his daughter Patricia Caughey said. Mary Pennell had "done reconstruction work in England after the war," and in the late 1940s "was teaching English at a girls' school in Cairo," Patricia Caughey said. "I'm not sure exactly how they met," she said, but "all the Americans tended to hang around together and go on field trips.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George J. Crits, 92, of Ardmore, an expert in the field of water and wastewater treatment, died Thursday, March 27, at his home of causes related to aging. Mr. Crits was renowned in the industry for his expertise in ion exchange technology. Ion exchange is used to soften water and separate out unwanted elements. Mr. Crits wrote three books on the subject, the last of which was published in 2012. It was titled Crits Notes on Water and Ion Exchange . Bill Runyan, president of Idreco USA Ltd., a water treatment company in West Chester, called Crits Notes "the Bible of water treatment.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
Former Brown University president Donald Hornig, 92, who worked on the atomic bomb and was a scientific adviser to three U.S. presidents, died Monday, Jan. 21, said a university spokesman. Mr. Hornig, a Harvard-trained chemist, worked on the atomic bomb at Los Alamos, N.M., before becoming a professor at Brown in 1946, the university said. He also taught at Princeton. The school said he advised Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Hornig, Brown president from 1970 to 1976, inherited a university with an annual deficit of more than $4 million, leading him to institute an austerity plan that deeply cut the deficit.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
Petraeus wins vote to lead CIA WASHINGTON - The Senate unanimously confirmed Gen. David H. Petraeus as director of the CIA, turning over the nation's intelligence operations to the man credited with turning back insurgencies in Iraq. The nomination of Petraeus, the top commander of the war effort in Afghanistan, was approved by a 94-0 vote. Petraeus will replace Leon E. Panetta, whose appointment as secretary of defense sailed through the Senate last week. Petraeus is to retire from his current post in late July and take over at the CIA after a transition period.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By P. Solomon Banda and Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press
LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - A wildfire burning near the desert birthplace of the atomic bomb advanced on the Los Alamos laboratory and thousands of outdoor drums of plutonium-contaminated waste Tuesday as authorities stepped up efforts to protect the site and monitor the air for radiation. Officials at the nation's premier nuclear weapons lab gave assurances that dangerous materials were safely stored and capable of withstanding flames from the 93-square-mile fire, which as of midday was as close as 50 feet from the grounds.
NEWS
June 24, 2010
Nuclear physicist Joan Hinton, 88, labeled "the Atom Spy Who Got Away" during the anticommunist hysteria of early 1950s America for moving to China in 1948, died June 8 in Beijing. A spokesman for the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Mechanization, which Ms. Hinton had worked with since 1979, made the announcement. Recruited at 22 for the Manhattan Project to help develop the atomic bomb, she was so repulsed when the United States dropped it on Japan in World War II that she went to China, where she embraced Maoism and ran a dairy farm for much of the rest of her life.
NEWS
July 16, 2002 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It hurts to be a rodeo cowboy. Backs break. Jaws shatter. Teeth fly. Sleep is what you dream about while you drive all night to the next show. But cowboys don't get paid if they don't work, and so on a warm night in Arizona's central desert country, Joey Bell Jr. ignores his taped right ankle, the one that swelled up bigger than a softball after an earlier rodeo. In a few seconds, that ankle will sustain thousands of pounds of force as Bell leaps from a galloping horse and tackles a 500-pound steer.
NEWS
July 16, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Today, Ruth Donohue is an unassuming octogenarian who navigates the hallways of her retirement-home complex with a walker, the white bangs of her pageboy skimming the tops of her glasses. Her husband of 58 years, Arthur Tevebaugh, still dotes on her, and still whistles when he recalls the auburn-haired beauty he fell in love with. They met at work, but it wasn't just any job: They were among the scientists on the Manhattan Project, the U.S. program to build the first atomic bomb.
NEWS
August 28, 2000
Hermann Lisco, a gifted scientist and legendary teacher, died last week. He was a quiet man from an unquiet place. German-born, he received his medical degree from the University of Berlin in 1936, came to the United States to teach pathology at Johns Hopkins University, and was recruited to the Manhattan Project. In secret, he worked with a team of scientists at the University of Chicago studying the biological effects of a strange new human creation: plutonium. Later, he was flown to Los Alamos to study the first person ever to be killed by acute radiation poisoning.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | By Jonathan S. Landay, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Outraged by security lapses at the nation's oldest nuclear weapons laboratory, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson yesterday named two former lawmakers to investigate the disappearance of computer hard drives containing nuclear weapons secrets. Former Sen. Howard Baker (R., Tenn.) and former Rep. Lee Hamilton (D., Ind.) will look into the incident at Los Alamos National Laboratory and recommend "corrective measures," Richardson said. "I will not tolerate security lapses and I'm outraged at what happened," Richardson said in a statement one day after the New Mexico lab disclosed that the two hard drives had vanished.
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