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Los Lobos

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NEWS
February 21, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
The great Chicano band from East L.A., unjustly denied entry into the 2016 class of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, is touring behind their 2015 album, Gates of Gold . Saturday at the Sellersville Theatre.
NEWS
September 7, 1993 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
JUST ANOTHER BAND FROM EAST L.A.: A COLLECTION Los Lobos (Slash/Warner Bros.) Los Lobos, just another band from East L.A.? Yeah, and Marlon Brando was just another thespian from Omaha. Since forming in the early '70s, Los Lobos has quietly grown into one of the most mesmerizing, original American bands around, a party rock fave and an ethnomusicologist's fantasy. Ably chronicling this strikingly original group is "Just Another Band from East L.A.: A Collection," a two-disc set that does everything a compilation should do: Along with the hits, the 41-track release features rare stuff (four songs from their 1978 album of Mexican tunes)
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
For the last few years, Los Lobos, the East Los Angeles quintet known for its skillful blend of blues, soul and upbeat norteno music, has had an unusual personnel problem. The band's lackluster drummer, Louis Perez, is also responsible for writing, with multi-instrumentalist David Hidalgo, most of its songs. He's good at providing material, but not so good at executing it. On the recent The Neighborhood, the band covered this weakness by having ace studio drummer Jim Keltner play.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
If you can spare just a couple of hours to visit at the Philadelphia Folk Festival this weekend, be sure it's Sunday afternoon for the 4-6 p.m. show headlined by Los Lobos and featuring talented localite John Flynn. The personnel will be the same, but Los Lobos won't sound like the same bunch of Los Angelinos you've heard rocking sweet and hard at nightclubs and theaters, with just a little Latin lilt evoking their ethnic origins. "When we do a folk festival, we go full blast to our roots, relying more on the Mexican folk music of Veracruz, Michoacan and Guerrero," said David Hidalgo, the group's multi-instrumental virtuoso and singer.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Everybody complains about the heat at rock-and-roll clubs in the summertime. But Thursday at the infernal Trocadero, sweat was an essential element. Both NRBQ and Los Lobos, who drew over 700 enthusiastic dancers to the Center City venue, come from the bar-band tradition. Both thrive once they have set a room in motion, and pride themselves on the ability to survey all strains of American music - everything from country balladry to R&B shouts and norteno waltzes - without breaking the momentum on the dance floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Los Lobos, the East Los Angeles band that mixes rock-and-roll, Mexican folk music and the blues to achieve an original sound, performs at the Chestnut Cabaret tomorrow and Sunday. Los Lobos' new album, By the Light of the Moon (Slash/Warner Bros.), is more uneven than the band's previous release, the magisterial How Will the Wolf Survive?, but it has its great moments, especially in the opening song, "One Time, One Night. " On this song, David Hidalgo's lovely, plaintive tenor voice sings a lyric filled with little anecdotes about people scattered across the country, and the song coheres as a portrait of America eloquent in its simple straightforwardness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Taj Mahal doesn't work too hard these days. Perched beneath a big ol' floppy straw hat and a generously-sized Hawaiian shirt, the 64-year-old bluesman sits down when he plays guitar and lets a chorus pedal do all the heavy lifting. These days his voice sounds like he swallowed an alligator and washed it down with gasoline. Which was just fine with the capacity crowd of middle-aged boomers who have turned to his music as comfort food ever since his incendiary performance on the 1968 Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, which, as it happens, aired locally on public television on the eve of his Thursday-night appearance at the Keswick, where he opened for those beloved ambassadors from the barrio, Los Lobos.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
The acoustic instruments arranged on the Verizon Hall stage made it obvious: For this performance, Los Lobos would play up the "cultural" angle. Neither the brawny Chicano rock hopefuls of the '80s nor the playful studio experimentalists of the '90s were present at the Kimmel Center Sunday night. These were veteran musicians exploring their ethnic roots on a tour of upscale theaters. As singer-guitarist Cesar Rosas said of the traditional material that began their set: "These were pop songs, like 50 years ago. They're folk songs now. " But deep down, Los Lobos are too stubborn a bar band to stoop to the lackadaisical strumming and respectful nostalgia of folkie revivalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
After spending a decade exploring the sonic possibilities of groove and atmosphere on albums such as 1998's Colossal Head, Los Lobos decided it was time for a change. "We wanted to, in effect, start again," says Philadelphia-born sax player Steve Berlin. "We wanted to make a record that was evolutionary. " The spirited Good Morning Aztl?n resulted, an album rooted in R & B ballads, bluesy rockers, and Mexican folk songs. The band will be in town this weekend for the annual WXPN Singer Songwriter Weekend at Penn's Landing, which also features Suzanne Vega, Patty Griffin and Solomon Burke, among others.
NEWS
March 23, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Over the course of its last two albums, How Will the Wolf Survive? and the recent By the Light of the Moon (Slash/Warner Bros.), the Los Angeles-based band Los Lobos has made some of the most lovely, moving music in rock-and- roll. Combining rock, blues, country and Latino folk music, Los Lobos has come up with a unique blend of various kinds of popular music - Paul Simon found it so compelling he asked the band to accompany him on one song on his Grammy-winning Graceland. Performing for the first of two nights at the Chestnut Cabaret on Saturday, Los Lobos gave its usual lively, kind-spirited show.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Los Lobos. The great Chicano rock-and-roll band from East L.A. will close out the 55th Philadelphia Folk Festival in style on a final-day bill that will also include Marty Stuart & the Fabulous Superlatives and C.J. Chenier & the Buckwheat Zydeco Band. Sunday at the Old Poole Farm in Schwenksville. Ween. The return of Aaron Freeman and Mickey Melchiondo, New Hope's own Chocolate & Cheese duo of inveterate jokesters and exacting musicians - otherwise known as Gene and Dean Ween - who split in 2012 after nearly three decades, and who are now back together where they belong.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2016 | By John Timpane, For The Inquirer
Los Lobos embody the indie life. This former wedding band, this onetime acoustic outfit from East Los Angeles, once traveled around to small venues all over the place in the obligatory beat-up van. For more than 40 years, they've held it together, through small-label albums; major-label contracts and terminations; the long, global road; occasional big hits (their take on "La Bamba"; their trademark tune, "Will the Wolf Survive?"; their roustabout version of the Dead's "Bertha"); critical plaudits; adulation on the margins; and really great live shows.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
The great Chicano band from East L.A., unjustly denied entry into the 2016 class of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, is touring behind their 2015 album, Gates of Gold . Saturday at the Sellersville Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Exquisita - Spanish for "exquisite" - may be the single best adjective to describe Sunday's diverse two-set acoustic performance by Los Lobos at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater. Diversity is the watchword for the veteran East Los Angeles-based Mexican American roots-rock-plus-plus combo: the Lobos' complex persona and varied catalog indeed contains multitudes. There was aching beauty in "El Gusto," the timeless Mexican música folklórica tune rendered by David Hidalgo on dizzying violin Sunday, his plaintive tenor voice breaking up to falsetto in the classic Huasteca style.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
In a career creeping up on four decades, the Los Angeles quintet Los Lobos has left many high-water marks. But should the need arise to explain the group's greatness to future generations, there's no question which of its 15 albums would end up in the time capsule. Kiko , whose 20th anniversary the group marked by playing the complete album at the Keswick Theatre on Sunday night, was Los Lobos' Achtung Baby , an artistic breakthrough that both encapsulated and obliterated everything that had come before.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | staff
Live music and more, tonight through Thursday, compiled by Shaun Brady, Tom Di Nardo, James Johnson, Sara Sherr and Jonathan Takiff. POP . . . plus Kings Go Forth: Ten-piece, soulsational band from Milwaukee gets the blood pumping with its new (but old-sounding) brew in the James Brown tradition. For extra flavor, Dr. Ketchup pours jazzy instrumentals. Johnny Brenda's, 1201 N. Frankford Ave., 9 tonight, $12, 215-739-9684, www.johnnybrendas.com . Free Energy: Next best thing to free beer?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010
Pop Tin Can Trust (Shout! Factory . ) With the second song on their new album, "On Main Street," Los Lobos celebrate the joys of home and community, specifically their own East Los Angeles stomping grounds. Over a slinky, R&B-tinged vamp, David Hidalgo oozes his usual brown-eyed soul as he sings in the sweetly plaintive tenor that is one of the band's most endearing hallmarks: "Nothing better than running down the boulevard/ Getting a little dirt on my shoes/ With my brothers and sisters hanging all around/ Chasing away all my blues.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Taj Mahal doesn't work too hard these days. Perched beneath a big ol' floppy straw hat and a generously-sized Hawaiian shirt, the 64-year-old bluesman sits down when he plays guitar and lets a chorus pedal do all the heavy lifting. These days his voice sounds like he swallowed an alligator and washed it down with gasoline. Which was just fine with the capacity crowd of middle-aged boomers who have turned to his music as comfort food ever since his incendiary performance on the 1968 Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, which, as it happens, aired locally on public television on the eve of his Thursday-night appearance at the Keswick, where he opened for those beloved ambassadors from the barrio, Los Lobos.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
The acoustic instruments arranged on the Verizon Hall stage made it obvious: For this performance, Los Lobos would play up the "cultural" angle. Neither the brawny Chicano rock hopefuls of the '80s nor the playful studio experimentalists of the '90s were present at the Kimmel Center Sunday night. These were veteran musicians exploring their ethnic roots on a tour of upscale theaters. As singer-guitarist Cesar Rosas said of the traditional material that began their set: "These were pop songs, like 50 years ago. They're folk songs now. " But deep down, Los Lobos are too stubborn a bar band to stoop to the lackadaisical strumming and respectful nostalgia of folkie revivalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Kimmel Center's fifth nonclassical season serves up a mixed bag of tried-and-true world music, pop, and jazz, along with a handful of intriguing programming selections. The season starts with Tony Bennett (Sept. 15), then gets its two pop-music highlights out of the way early, with Philadelphia-born soul man Solomon Burke (Sept. 17), and the great East L.A. Chicano rock band Los Lobos, with sterling Texas singer-songwriter Alejandro Escovedo opening (Oct. 2). Other than a Mavis Staples-Taj Mahal soul-and-blues bill (March 11)
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