CollectionsLou Reed
IN THE NEWS

Lou Reed

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 29, 1986 | By Robert Gordon, Special to The Inquirer
Touring to promote his new album, Mistrial (RCA), Lou Reed pleaded his case at the Mann Music Center Sunday. Seeming to ask for a reassessment of his career, Reed chose selections from his 20 years in music that portrayed his happier, positive side. He did not play his darker, more negative songs, which are often associated with drug addiction. Reed has written some good new material, and he has the ability to make his older material sound fresh. Opening his show with "We're Gonna Have a Real Good Time Together" from his early band, the Velvet Underground, Reed performed such past hits as "Sweet Jane" and "Street Hassle.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1998 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"I really disliked school, disliked groups, disliked authority," the singer and guitarist explains at the start of Lou Reed: Rock and Roll Heart, the hour-long "American Masters" special airing on Channel 12 at 10 tonight. "I was made for rock and roll. " Reed is the first rocker to get the "American Masters" treatment - previous subjects include Martha Graham, Lena Horne and Reed's late mentor, Andy Warhol. And oddly enough, the quintessential New York rocker turns out to be the perfect choice in many ways for a PBS pseudo-highbrow hagiography.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Lou Reed, the influential songwriter whose groundbreaking work with the Velvet Underground in the 1960s and as a solo artist did more to expand the lyrical parameters of rock songwriting than anyone other than Bob Dylan, has died. He was 71. Rolling Stone magazine first reported the death of Mr. Reed, who underwent a liver transplant this year. "I am stronger than ever," he wrote on his website in June. "I am a triumph of modern medicine, physics and chemistry. . . . I look forward to being on stage performing, and writing more songs to connect with your hearts and spirits and the universe well into the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
This is no time for celebration This is no time for shaking hands This is no time for backslapping This is no time for marching bands. - Lou Reed, 1989 And yet, in his own way, Lou Reed is celebrating. Because he knows that somewhere in America, on the day the nation swears in a new president, on that day of collective backslapping and national marching- band pageantry, there's a fair chance that someone will be listening to his new album, New York, and hear the flip side of the feelgood.
NEWS
March 25, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
Remember the 1960s? (No, this is not a late-night TV ad for an oldies-but- goodies three-record set.) Remember when politicians and pundits quoted Bob Dylan and the Beatles and the Stones to prove they were on the side of the future? Well, I want to tell you about a song that a major rock figure is singing these days. At the risk of looking like a befuddled middle-aged writer in search of portents in a record store, I think it may mean something. The singer is Lou Reed. Back in the days when Andy Warhol was defining "the scene," Reed was part of the Velvet Underground, singing about life in a world that Norman Rockwell did not illustrate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Lou Reed loves Dr. Dog. Reed's keynote address at this year's South by Southwest Festival took the form of an interview/conversation with the Philadelphia-reared record producer Hal Willner. Reed - who's here to promote Berlin, the movie directed by Julian Schnabel of 2006 performances of Reed's classic 1973 album - was asked what music he was listening to. Reed mentioned the Japanese noise-rock band Melt Banana, the Toronto electro-dance band Holy F-, and "the one I really like is Dr. Dog. " The West Philly band took part in a Reed tribute at the Fader Fort here Thursday.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S FALL when the leaves start to turn and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announces its new class of nominees. And Tattle goes, Huh? There's a little bit less of that this year as nominees include Velvet Underground founding member Lou Reed , Green Day and Nine Inch Nails (both in their first year of eligibility), the Smiths and Sting , all of whom have some legit rock cred. They're joined by repeat nominees the Paul Butterfield Blues Band , Chic , Joan Jett & the Blackhearts , Kraftwerk and N.W.A.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With the October death of Lou Reed - Velvet Underground leader, influential solo artist - rock lost one of its most adventurous souls. It's Lou Reed's time, as it never was while he lived, and that of the Velvet Underground, as it never was while members were, so briefly, together. They are the subject of books (Mick Wall's Lou Reed: The Life ); a compilation of the band's primitive best (the music label Sundazed gives us Velvet Underground ); and an extravagant box focusing on the 1968 album White Light/White Heat , complete with live rarities.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Beat writer William S. Burroughs died in 1997, but he's putting out four new works in quick succession, one involving actor Steve Buscemi, another with a former local producer at the helm. Hal Wilner, Lower Merion-born producer and longtime Saturday Night Live music coordinator, is behind Let Me Hang You , an album released in July of previously unheard tapes in which Burroughs reads the naughtier bits of his landmark novel Naked Lunch over skronky music from such artists as King Khan, Bill Frisell, Wayne Horvitz, and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Laurie Anderson's Heart of a Dog is a dreamy thing, part doc, part memoir, part meditation, in which the dauntingly multidisciplined artist (painting, sculpture, poetry, music, moviemaking) celebrates the life of her beloved rat terrier, Lolabelle, mourning her death and honoring it, too. Incorporating old 8mm home movies, staging reenactments of childhood events, quoting Kierkegaard, and noting how the Department of Homeland Security's cautionary catchphrase, "If you see something, say something," sounds like it was written by the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, Anderson explores spiritual and physical dimensions - and the points where they might intersect.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Beat writer William S. Burroughs died in 1997, but he's putting out four new works in quick succession, one involving actor Steve Buscemi, another with a former local producer at the helm. Hal Wilner, Lower Merion-born producer and longtime Saturday Night Live music coordinator, is behind Let Me Hang You , an album released in July of previously unheard tapes in which Burroughs reads the naughtier bits of his landmark novel Naked Lunch over skronky music from such artists as King Khan, Bill Frisell, Wayne Horvitz, and more.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spotlight Michael Keaton, Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, and Liev Schrieber lead an ace ensemble cast in this compelling account of the Boston Globe's 2002 investigative series on sexual abuse in the Catholic Church. A complex procedural drama, told with clarity and mounting suspense. One of the great movies about journalism, and one of the great movies of our time, period. R Heart of a Dog Laurie Anderson's part-doc/part-memoir/ part-meditation is a dreamy thing in which the dauntingly multidisciplined artist celebrates the life of her beloved rat terrier, Lolabelle, mourning her death and honoring it, too. Other deaths - the tragedy of 9/11, the passing of her husband, Lou Reed - haunt the film, but also fill it with inspiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Laurie Anderson's Heart of a Dog is a dreamy thing, part doc, part memoir, part meditation, in which the dauntingly multidisciplined artist (painting, sculpture, poetry, music, moviemaking) celebrates the life of her beloved rat terrier, Lolabelle, mourning her death and honoring it, too. Incorporating old 8mm home movies, staging reenactments of childhood events, quoting Kierkegaard, and noting how the Department of Homeland Security's cautionary catchphrase, "If you see something, say something," sounds like it was written by the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, Anderson explores spiritual and physical dimensions - and the points where they might intersect.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
On Valentine's Day 2014, Adrien Reju played a set of what she called "unconventional love songs" at the Fire. The singer-songwriter covered songs by Sonny Bono, Lou Reed, Skeeter Davis, and others, and the show sent her down the path that led to her second full-length album, Strange Love and the Secret Language . "My choices for that show were a little more wacky or quirky," says Reju, who will perform a solo show Friday night at Burlap &...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014 | the Inquirer Staff
Close, but ... Matt McAndrew , of Philadelphia and the Jersey Shore, who had been one of the favorites all season, finished second on The Voice , NBC's singing competition, Tuesday night. Country-music specialist Craig Wayne Boyd was the winner, based on fan votes and downloads. McAndrew's self-penned "Wasted Love" had been atop the iTunes singles charts all day Tuesday. "It's one of the best songs I've ever heard in my life," McAndrew's coach, Maroon 5's Adam Levine , gushed Monday night.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S FALL when the leaves start to turn and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announces its new class of nominees. And Tattle goes, Huh? There's a little bit less of that this year as nominees include Velvet Underground founding member Lou Reed , Green Day and Nine Inch Nails (both in their first year of eligibility), the Smiths and Sting , all of whom have some legit rock cred. They're joined by repeat nominees the Paul Butterfield Blues Band , Chic , Joan Jett & the Blackhearts , Kraftwerk and N.W.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Rock-star envy is creeping into the classical world, as artists from Christopher O'Riley to the Ebene Quartet transcribe music conceived for electric pop instruments for whatever they play best - with varying success. Few have hurled themselves into this rock/classical netherworld as fearlessly as cellist Maya Beiser, whose late-night FringeArts Stage concert on Sunday encompassed Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Lou Reed with two rock-based sidemen. No question that she has the chops to make her cello a license-to-kill instrument, helped by a hybrid electric instrument she used intermittently.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
"In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes. " Andy Warhol's 15 has been the longest in the history of time, and his fame for his iconic Campbell Soup cans and multiple portraits of Marilyn lives on. The artist who defined the Pop Art movement is the subject of Andy: A Popera , the love child/brainchild of the Bearded Ladies and Opera Philadelphia. Their collaboration will culminate in a full production in March 2015, but meanwhile, this work-in-progress is presented as a cabaret in the Wilma Theater's lobby.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With the October death of Lou Reed - Velvet Underground leader, influential solo artist - rock lost one of its most adventurous souls. It's Lou Reed's time, as it never was while he lived, and that of the Velvet Underground, as it never was while members were, so briefly, together. They are the subject of books (Mick Wall's Lou Reed: The Life ); a compilation of the band's primitive best (the music label Sundazed gives us Velvet Underground ); and an extravagant box focusing on the 1968 album White Light/White Heat , complete with live rarities.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
To most of the world, Ben Vaughn is known for his work in television (composing and scoring 3rd Rock From the Sun and That '70s Show , among other programs), his role as a producer of goofballs (Ween, for one), and his syndicated radio show, The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn . To radio jock Jerry Blavat, Vaughn is the "hottest thing since popcorn. " To his (former) fellow Philadelphians, however, Vaughn is a twang-bar king whose inspirations range from rockabilly icons (Duane Eddy)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|