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Louis Armstrong

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They called him Satchmo, short for Satchelmouth. His friends called him Louis, not Looie. He may have been the greatest jazz trumpeter who ever lived. No? All right, name a greater. Louis Armstrong was certainly one of the most original, influential and popular artists in this uniquely American art form with its roots in African American life and creativity. More than anyone else in his time, he brought American jazz to the world. They called him "Ambassador Satch. " On Dec. 8, 1932, Armstrong - then 31 years old and already famous - went to Camden to make some recordings at the old Victor Records studio at Market and Front Streets.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | By NAT HENTOFF
THIS YEAR was the 100th anniversary of Louis Armstrong's birth. Before he died in 1971, his last recording was a reading of "A Visit From St. Nicholas" for HBO's " 'Twas the Night," airing this month for very young children. In a time when we are keenly mindful of our struggle for our liberties, his story is especially luminous. In the early 1950s, some of the younger black jazz musicians called Armstrong a "handkerchief head. " Dizzy Gillespie, a rising star of modern jazz, spoke of Armstrong's "plantation image.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
Joe Muranyi, 84, a clarinetist whose mastery of pre-World War II jazz led to a four-year stint with Louis Armstrong's last band - and to an improbable moment of pop stardom - died April 20 in Manhattan. The cause was congestive heart failure, said his daughter, Adrienne Fuss. Mr. Muranyi was among a handful of jazz musicians who began their careers in the 1950s but looked to an earlier era for inspiration. Although he once studied with the forward-thinking pianist and composer Lennie Tristano, he spent most of his career with Dixieland bands, and he was widely regarded as one of the premier clarinetists in that genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It takes a brave theater critic to write a play, and an even braver one to review it - especially since Satchmo at the Waldorf is by Terry Teachout, the esteemed critic of the Wall Street Journal. So it's both a pleasure and a relief to tell you it's a great show. This add-on to Wilma's season comes from Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn., directed by Gordon Edelstein. It stars John Douglas Thompson, who plays Louis Armstrong, the world's greatest trumpet player - and also plays Armstrong's manager, as well as the musicians of the next generation, Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie, who think Armstrong is an Uncle Tom, a clown to entertain rich white folks.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Tom Di Nardo, For the Daily News
For its 39th season, the Philly Pops continues its successful formula, presenting highlights from pop, rock, jazz, and Broadway. The roster includes tributes to the Beatles, Elvis, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Fleetwood Mac, and Les Misérables . Designing a season from the vast pop genre represents a juggling act for Michael Krajewski, in his third season as music director. (He has just signed on for three more years.) Five shows must offer familiar fare to an audience that relates to music from previous generations.
NEWS
March 4, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Andr? De Shields conjures Louis Armstrong back to vibrant and captivating life in Ambassador Satch, but the show has to struggle with the inescapable fact of what happened to the jazz icon's image after his death 32 years ago. Armstrong was arguably the most significant force in American popular music in the last century. While jazz aficionados and historians rightly focus on his staggering achievements, the rest of the world remembers the sunny global entertainer that Armstrong became in the latter and less creative part of his career.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | by Cecil Johnson
Sunday marked the anniversary of one of the most significant events in this nation's history: Louis Armstrong's birth. Well . . .maybe. You see, no one is quite sure of the exact date of Satchmo's entry into this mortal realm. Some say he was born sometime in 1898. But he said he was born July 4, 1900. And if that's the way that cat wanted it, he earned the right to go down in history as being born on the Fourth of July. The important thing is that he got here whenever he did. And that has been exceedingly good for America, the world and music.
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Andr? De Shields believes that there are many lessons to be taken from the story of Louis Armstrong, so it's fitting that Ambassador Satch began life in a classroom. Ten years ago, De Shields, whose Broadway credits stretch from The Wiz and Ain't Misbehavin' in the late '70s to his Tony-nominated performance as Noah in The Full Monty, dutifully took on a public service project for the New York City school system. "The idea was to bring the art to kids in the public schools in the five boroughs," he recalled over coffee in a midtown hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
The other day, for reasons I will come to directly, I found myself humming the old Ozzie Nelson novelty number, "I'm Looking for a Guy Who Plays Alto and Baritone and Doubles on the Clarinet and Wears a Size 37 Suit. " What triggered this aberration was a press agent's packet containing a poster, a toy trumpet and an announcement that Kenneth Feld, the circus magnate and occasional theatrical producer ("Barnum," "The Three Musketeers"), is about to launch a "nationwide search" for the star of his latest offering to the spirit of Thespis.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Louie Bluie's name is neither Louie nor Bluie, but Howard Armstrong. As he explains it in the documentary "Louie Bluie," a lady in her cups at one of his musical performances noted that although he was an Armstrong, he wasn't Louis Armstrong - "You're just plain ol' Louie Bluie. " Louie Bluie Howard Armstrong is, among other things - the other things including poet, cartoonist, womanizer and pornographic book author - a fiddler, mandolinist and leader of what is purported to be "America's last black string band.
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NEWS
March 7, 2016
e remains one of jazz's most broadly popular figures, yet still holds on to an unshakable degree of respectability. - BBC Mark Randall is a Philadelphia writer The BBC was talking about Ramsey Lewis, but what's interesting here is not the subject or even the opinion but rather the inference lurking in that little word yet . Broadly popular yet still respectable? What that yet implies is that jazz players who achieve broad popularity do so at the expense of their authenticity and hence, the respect of their more properly unpopular peers.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Tom Di Nardo, For the Daily News
For its 39th season, the Philly Pops continues its successful formula, presenting highlights from pop, rock, jazz, and Broadway. The roster includes tributes to the Beatles, Elvis, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Fleetwood Mac, and Les Misérables . Designing a season from the vast pop genre represents a juggling act for Michael Krajewski, in his third season as music director. (He has just signed on for three more years.) Five shows must offer familiar fare to an audience that relates to music from previous generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a kid growing up in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, Herb Alpert heard a lot of music around the house. His father, Louis, played mandolin, and his brother was a drummer. He himself started on trumpet at age 8, getting classical training. After high school, he went to the University of Southern California, where he played trumpet in the marching band for two years before dropping out. He went on to the Army - and from there to pop superstardom. That little boy is now 79, with a slew of chart-topping hits, albums, a leading music company (A&M)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It takes a brave theater critic to write a play, and an even braver one to review it - especially since Satchmo at the Waldorf is by Terry Teachout, the esteemed critic of the Wall Street Journal. So it's both a pleasure and a relief to tell you it's a great show. This add-on to Wilma's season comes from Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn., directed by Gordon Edelstein. It stars John Douglas Thompson, who plays Louis Armstrong, the world's greatest trumpet player - and also plays Armstrong's manager, as well as the musicians of the next generation, Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie, who think Armstrong is an Uncle Tom, a clown to entertain rich white folks.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
Joe Muranyi, 84, a clarinetist whose mastery of pre-World War II jazz led to a four-year stint with Louis Armstrong's last band - and to an improbable moment of pop stardom - died April 20 in Manhattan. The cause was congestive heart failure, said his daughter, Adrienne Fuss. Mr. Muranyi was among a handful of jazz musicians who began their careers in the 1950s but looked to an earlier era for inspiration. Although he once studied with the forward-thinking pianist and composer Lennie Tristano, he spent most of his career with Dixieland bands, and he was widely regarded as one of the premier clarinetists in that genre.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
AL RUSSELL JUST didn't want to quit. At age 90, he was still considering getting back to the piano and belting out his signature R&B and jazz vocals for a grateful audience. After all, he'd been doing it since the eighth grade. Why quit now? But Wilbert "Al" Russell, founder of musical groups that performed all over the country and in England and Ireland at their height, a composer and self-taught piano player with a rich tenor voice, died of cancer on Christmas Eve. He was 90 and was living in a Wynnewood nursing home, but had lived in West Philadelphia since 1946.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2010 | By SHAUN BRADY, For the Daily News
BUDDY BOLDEN is probably the most influential musician you've never heard of. He's certainly the most influential musician those he's influenced have never even heard. A renowned cornetist and bandleader in New Orleans at the turn of the 20th century, Bolden was a jazz innovator during the music's earliest development. But struggles with alcoholism and schizophrenia cut his career short at age 30, when he was admitted to the insane asylum, where he spent the rest of his life. He left behind no recordings, only a legacy passed through word of mouth and the testimony of his musical disciples.
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a few sweet, sultry seconds yesterday, the notes of Louis Armstrong's gold-plated trumpet once again blew magically over working-class Queens. It was a sound that serenaded 107th Street for almost 30 years beginning in 1943, when Armstrong's wife, Lucille, bought the frame house where the jazz legend often played for neighborhood children, who called him "Pops. " Yesterday, the city of New York unveiled it as a museum, and man, the joint was jumpin'. The Gully Low Jazz Band, featuring clarinetist Joe Muranyi, who once played with Armstrong, transformed the street into a New Orleans-style party.
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Andr? De Shields believes that there are many lessons to be taken from the story of Louis Armstrong, so it's fitting that Ambassador Satch began life in a classroom. Ten years ago, De Shields, whose Broadway credits stretch from The Wiz and Ain't Misbehavin' in the late '70s to his Tony-nominated performance as Noah in The Full Monty, dutifully took on a public service project for the New York City school system. "The idea was to bring the art to kids in the public schools in the five boroughs," he recalled over coffee in a midtown hotel.
NEWS
March 4, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Andr? De Shields conjures Louis Armstrong back to vibrant and captivating life in Ambassador Satch, but the show has to struggle with the inescapable fact of what happened to the jazz icon's image after his death 32 years ago. Armstrong was arguably the most significant force in American popular music in the last century. While jazz aficionados and historians rightly focus on his staggering achievements, the rest of the world remembers the sunny global entertainer that Armstrong became in the latter and less creative part of his career.
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