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Louis Freeh

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BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former FBI director Louis Freeh, now chairman of the Center City law firm Pepper Hamilton, was seriously injured Monday in the town of Barnard Vermont when the SUV he was driving swerved off the road and collided with a tree. Vermont State police responded to the scene at 12:16 p.m. and Freeh was taken by helicopter to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire for treatment. There were no other injuries, police said. Stephanie Brackin-Dasaro, a police spokeswoman, said the cause of the crash remains under investigation.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
As FBI director, Louis Freeh's hard-driving style brought down terrorists and pushed forward a perjury investigation that led straight to his boss - in the Oval Office. As a federal judge, he sent hundreds of drug dealers to prison and earned a reputation for doling out tough justice. And as he presented on Thursday the results of his investigation into one of the largest scandals in the history of college athletics, Freeh's scathing assessment proved once again that he has never been one to shy away from uncomfortable conclusions.
NEWS
October 9, 2002 | By Frank Davies INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In his first public defense of the FBI's record before Sept. 11, former director Louis Freeh told lawmakers yesterday that he made terrorism a top priority but was hindered by a lack of resources from Congress. Polite but insistent, Freeh disputed a congressional staff's conclusion that before the attacks the FBI did not adequately cooperate with other agencies, prepare for domestic terrorism, or aggressively pursue clues to impending strikes. "I take exception to the finding that we were not sufficiently paying attention to terrorism at home," Freeh told the House and Senate intelligence committees investigating events leading up to the attacks.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pepper Hamilton said Friday it severed ties with a consulting firm founded by its former chairman, Louis Freeh. Freeh, the former FBI director, left Pepper Hamilton in February to rejoin his old firm, Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan. But the consulting firm, Freeh Group International Solutions, which focused on assisting clients with internal investigations, compliance and other matters, had remained as a unit of Pepper Hamilton. The law firm, which is in merger talks with the Reed Smith law firm, said it had transferred ownership of the Freeh Group International back to Freeh in March.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
The Senate confirmed Louis Freeh, 43, a federal judge, as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, but left hanging until after the summer recess a vote on the nomination of Dr. Joycelyn Elders to be U.S. surgeon general . Freeh succeeds William Sessions, whom President Clinton fired after Sessions had long been dogged by ethical questions. A former FBI agent and federal prosecutor with a reputation as a tough crime fighter, Freeh had an easy passage during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, pledging to keep the bureau free of political interference.
NEWS
May 17, 2001
If, as rumored, we risk losing John Timoney to the FBI, some Philadelphians are prepared to block all exits from the city with their bodies. Our police commissioner says he hasn't been approached about replacing Louis Freeh, who retires as FBI director next month, but we have to admit Timoney would be a great choice (don't tell anyone we said that; we plan to join the body-blockade on southbound I-95). Turning the FBI around would be quite a challenge, even to Timoney. Its string of embarrassing screw-ups, going way back to well before Freeh, has been capped by Freeh's admission that the bureau committed "serious error" in the case of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.
NEWS
December 4, 2001 | By Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
FBI Director Robert Mueller announced yesterday that he was restructuring the agency to increase its ability to fight terrorism and cyber crime and improve intelligence gathering and internal security. The changes, which Congress approved Friday, take effect immediately. The changes were made in response to the Justice Department's emphasis on domestic terrorism since Sept. 11 and to months of criticism of the FBI that preceded the attacks. Several reports critical of the bureau are due in coming months, and the reorganization anticipates their findings.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | Scripps Howard News Service
Think back to the so-called "good old days" when J. Edgar Hoover was director of the FBI. No one in government or in the press dared to criticize Hoover. He had "secret" files on politicians, journalist, civil-rights leaders and many others. If you were in "Who's Who," Hoover kept a file on you. Whatever Hoover requested, he received and, in some years, he was given additional money than he had never even sought. When the Hoover era ended and as his gilded reputation tarnished, the FBI entered the real world of human behavior.
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | By Claude Lewis
His name is Robert Mueller. As President Bush's nominee to succeed Louis Freeh as FBI director, Mueller will inherit myriad responsibilities - none more important than the restoration of the bureau's reputation as America's premier law-enforcement agency. For all of Freeh's obvious leadership qualities, the FBI continued to falter badly under his direction, so much so that many people who once respected the bureau have begun to question its policies and procedures. When the Senate confms Mueller this summer, all that is expected to change quickly.
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BUSINESS
April 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pepper Hamilton said Friday it severed ties with a consulting firm founded by its former chairman, Louis Freeh. Freeh, the former FBI director, left Pepper Hamilton in February to rejoin his old firm, Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan. But the consulting firm, Freeh Group International Solutions, which focused on assisting clients with internal investigations, compliance and other matters, had remained as a unit of Pepper Hamilton. The law firm, which is in merger talks with the Reed Smith law firm, said it had transferred ownership of the Freeh Group International back to Freeh in March.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Jason Laughlin, and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
A former FBI director and Pennsylvania State University used then-president Graham B. Spanier as the scapegoat when the school needed someone to take the fall for Jerry Sandusky's years of child molestation, Spanier contends in a suit filed Wednesday. Spanier's complaint alleged that Louis Freeh defamed him in a 2012 report that asserted that he ignored information that Sandusky, a former assistant football coach, sexually abused children, in some cases on school grounds. Spanier was "never aware of any child abuse accusations," the long-awaited suit, filed in Centre County, states, adding that he hardly knew Sandusky.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former FBI director Louis Freeh, now chairman of the Center City law firm Pepper Hamilton, was seriously injured Monday in the town of Barnard Vermont when the SUV he was driving swerved off the road and collided with a tree. Vermont State police responded to the scene at 12:16 p.m. and Freeh was taken by helicopter to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire for treatment. There were no other injuries, police said. Stephanie Brackin-Dasaro, a police spokeswoman, said the cause of the crash remains under investigation.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former FBI Director Louis J. Freeh will take over leadership of the law firm Pepper Hamilton L.L.P. later this month, replacing Nina Gussack, the firm announced Tuesday. Freeh, who last year completed a blistering report on the failure of Pennsylvania State University officials to report sexual abuse by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, merged his Wilmington-based firm with Pepper Hamilton last year. He said he expects to expand the firm's white-collar defense practice while further developing the in-house investigative and consulting work that was a forte of the firm he merged with Pepper Hamilton.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pepper Hamilton L.L.P., a prominent Center City-based law firm, and the Wilmington-based law firm of former FBI Director Louis J. Freeh announced Tuesday that they will merge following a four-year collaboration. They said the merger would bolster Pepper's white-collar defense practice and its overseas presence. Freeh, a former federal judge who was FBI director under President Bill Clinton, formed his own firm in 2006 and has headed numerous internal corruption and compliance probes for private companies and institutions.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I'm hoping that somewhere between heaven and hell, Joe Paterno starts his own support group. "Hello, my name is Joe and I'm . . . a disgraceful enabler. " That's what we know for sure, now that the findings of an independent investigation are out. We know that the Penn State football coach knew for years that Jerry Sandusky had abused children, yet he did nothing about it. Even worse was the cover-up at arguably the state's most powerful institution by the powerful men who ran it: Paterno, the righteous educator, the molder of young men with character; president Graham B. Spanier; athletic director Timothy Curley; and vice president Gary Schultz.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Devastating is the only way to describe the findings of a special inquiry into the scandal surrounding convicted child rapist Jerry Sandusky . Devastating for the leadership at Pennsylvania State University, devastating for the legacy of late football coach Joe Paterno, devastating for anyone who loves the school. But the conclusions of the independent panel led by former FBI Director Louis Freeh stand as both a condemnation and a rallying cry for broad-based reform. The report should spur state lawmakers to move quickly — as demanded by victims' advocates — to "enact laws to protect children instead of perpetrators.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Paterno, former Pennsylvania State University president Graham B. Spanier, and other top administrators conspired for more than a decade to keep quiet sex-abuse allegations against Jerry Sandusky, according to the findings of an internal investigation released Thursday. Fearing bad publicity, the head football coach and the president, along with athletic director Tim Curley and Gary Schultz, a former vice president in charge of campus police, "repeatedly concealed critical facts" and exhibited a "callous disregard for child victims," enabling the former assistant football coach to prey on boys for years, said Louis Freeh, a former FBI director commissioned last year to lead the investigation.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Paterno's famous good judgment and integrity were assaulted in the scathing Pennsylvania State University report that suggests the longtime head football coach misled a grand jury about his knowledge of a 1998 child-abuse investigation of Jerry Sandusky . Last year, Paterno testified that he knew nothing of the allegations against Sandusky, his longtime friend and onetime fellow coach, until 2001. According to the report issued Thursday by former FBI Director Louis Freeh, however, Paterno not only was aware of the 1998 investigation, but followed the case closely.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he was FBI director, Louis Freeh's hard-driving style brought down terrorists and pushed forward a perjury investigation that led straight to his boss - in the Oval Office. As a federal judge, he sent hundreds of drug dealers to prison and earned a reputation for doling out tough justice. And as he presented the results of his investigation Thursday into one of the largest scandals in the history of college athletics, Freeh's scathing assessment proved once again that he has never been one to shy away from uncomfortable conclusions.
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