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Louis Lortie

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NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
He seemed, at first, like one kind of cellist, and then another. Until the end of his Sunday afternoon recital at Independence Seaport Museum, when you realized that Jan Vogler was intent on crafting stylistic approaches so different to each composer, you might have been left searching for the musician's core personality. With sturdy and accommodating pianist Louis Lortie as his partner, the cellist with a sweet smile and a straight mop of sandy hair limited his range of colors in Beethoven's Sonata in A major (Op. 69)
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
On a night when the sound of thunder was drowned by the rain racketing on the metal-sheathed roof of the Mann Music Center, the Philadelphia Orchestra played Mozart. It was the first appearance with the orchestra of Canadian pianist Louis Lortie, and, somehow, a lull in the storm coincided with his performance of Mozart's Concerto in A (K. 414). In that lull, it was possible to hear in his playing a cultivated awareness of sound as an element in the shape of phrases, an easy dialogue with the orchestral instruments and a confident approach to the flow of the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Good sounds are expected at the Academy of Music this afternoon, when Charles Dutoit leads the Philadelphia Orchestra in Bartok's splendid Concerto for Orchestra and pianist Louis Lortie plays the Ravel Concerto in G. But there also are excellent opportunities to hear stimulating orchestral pieces outside the city. Over in Reading, conductor Sidney Rothstein has earned a good reputation leading the 80-year-strong Reading Symphony. Rothstein hasn't been with the orchestra nearly that many years, but over the last decade he has sharpened the ensemble's skills and not been shy about playing contemporary music.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You could spend a lifetime delving into all of Franz Liszt's roles as Western music's great change agent. Or you might simply have listened in Tuesday, as pianist Louis Lortie laid them bare before a Philadelphia Chamber Music Society audience. At the American Philosophical Society, with oils of Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin gazing down from the stage, Liszt rivaled the radical old patriots for conjuring a new world. In our time, Wagner may be the most frequently referenced starting point of modern music; opera as a medium has an obvious edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Rachmaninoff's The Isle of the Dead, the symphonic poem he penned after seeing a reproduction of the Arnold Bocklin painting, is not something you look forward to after a tough day at the office. Nevertheless, Charles Dutoit is using the lumbering giant, in its complete and longer version, no less, to open this weekend's concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra - just one good idea on an excellently conceived program. By the time the musicians had unfolded its lugubrious lines at the opening on Thursday, everyone had stopped the lapses into daydream that plague all but the most extraordinary concert experiences.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Vladimir Feltsman, a Soviet emigre pianist, and Gil Shaham, a 17-year-old American-born Israeli violinist, will make their Philadelphia debuts during the Mann Music Center's 59th season, which opens June 21. Soviet cellist Karine Georgian and Canadian pianist Louis Lortie also will make their local debuts in the Philadelphia Orchestra's summer season in Fairmount Park. Soviet conductor Yuri Temirkanov, 49-year-old music director of the Kirov Opera in Leningrad, will lead the orchestra at the summer concerts for the first time, opening the season and conducting the first week's three programs.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Old friends and important debuts will dot this summer's Mann Music Center schedule, continuing the Mann tradition of world-class performers. The free Tuesday-Thursday-Friday concerts, to be held this year from June 21 to Aug. 5, represent 18 opportunities (plus one children's concert) to sample the Philadelphia Orchestra. Free tickets will be available through coupons to be published in the Daily News. (The Mann management also announced that schedules will be altered in the 1989 season to discontinue Friday concerts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Few things galvanize the public's attention like a feat, especially one made to look as easy as Louis Lortie's recital Tuesday of each and every Chopin etude. Their technical demands are so intensive and relentless that few pianists have done all the etudes in a single recital. But Lortie, a Canadian pianist, augmented the usual 24 that make up the Op. 10 and Op. 25 sets with the stray Trois Nouvelles Etudes. The only other program I've heard with both Op. 10 and 25 was a 1970s outing by the late Youri Egorov, who (unlike the suave Lortie)
NEWS
February 24, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra will premiere three commissioned works next season as it plays its interim year without a music director. Wolfgang Sawallisch, music director-designate, and Riccardo Muti, conductor laureate, will each conduct four weeks of the subscription series in spring 1993, and Sawallisch will lead the orchestra on a three-week Asian tour in May and early June. Sawallisch also will conduct the opening gala Sept. 15, 1992, when pianist Emanuel Ax will be soloist in the Beethoven Concerto No. 5 and a "Come and Meet the Music" concert, March 15, 1993.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
This is the final concertgoer's guide to the summer Philadelphia Orchestra concerts at the Mann Music Center. Mann artistic director Charles Dutoit will lead the Philadelphians in tonight's French program and Thursday's final series concert; newcomer Ion Marin makes his Orchestra debut on Wednesday. TONIGHT Due to a broken blood vessel in her throat, mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade has cancelled, and the solo spot will be filled by pianist Louis Lortie. MUSIC TO BE PLAYED: Overture to "Zampa," Louis Herold (1831)
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NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You could spend a lifetime delving into all of Franz Liszt's roles as Western music's great change agent. Or you might simply have listened in Tuesday, as pianist Louis Lortie laid them bare before a Philadelphia Chamber Music Society audience. At the American Philosophical Society, with oils of Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin gazing down from the stage, Liszt rivaled the radical old patriots for conjuring a new world. In our time, Wagner may be the most frequently referenced starting point of modern music; opera as a medium has an obvious edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Never has a composer's anniversary been celebrated so widely but with so little new repertoire to discover. Frederic Chopin, arguably the piano's greatest lyric poet, the man who forever changed what it can do and say, is enjoying an avalanche of discs and downloads in his 200th-birthday year as pianists take his never-out-of-style pieces for a spin. Some return in glory, others not so much. For all its meticulous craftsmanship, improvisational inspiration and matchless charm, Chopin's music asks - but never demands - a degree of self-revelation not all performers are willing (or able)
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
He seemed, at first, like one kind of cellist, and then another. Until the end of his Sunday afternoon recital at Independence Seaport Museum, when you realized that Jan Vogler was intent on crafting stylistic approaches so different to each composer, you might have been left searching for the musician's core personality. With sturdy and accommodating pianist Louis Lortie as his partner, the cellist with a sweet smile and a straight mop of sandy hair limited his range of colors in Beethoven's Sonata in A major (Op. 69)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though celebrated German cellist Jan Vogler's forthcoming series of Philadelphia concerts looks like an intelligently devised sortie - two Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia performances, a Curtis Institute master class, and a chamber music recital in the spring - it's just a less-anonymous version of visits he's made for years. "I go to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra. Many friends of mine went to the Curtis Institute and stayed," he said the other day. "Now I hope there will be friendship between the people of Philadelphia and me. " And it's probably overdue.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Few things galvanize the public's attention like a feat, especially one made to look as easy as Louis Lortie's recital Tuesday of each and every Chopin etude. Their technical demands are so intensive and relentless that few pianists have done all the etudes in a single recital. But Lortie, a Canadian pianist, augmented the usual 24 that make up the Op. 10 and Op. 25 sets with the stray Trois Nouvelles Etudes. The only other program I've heard with both Op. 10 and 25 was a 1970s outing by the late Youri Egorov, who (unlike the suave Lortie)
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
This is the final concertgoer's guide to the summer Philadelphia Orchestra concerts at the Mann Music Center. Mann artistic director Charles Dutoit will lead the Philadelphians in tonight's French program and Thursday's final series concert; newcomer Ion Marin makes his Orchestra debut on Wednesday. TONIGHT Due to a broken blood vessel in her throat, mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade has cancelled, and the solo spot will be filled by pianist Louis Lortie. MUSIC TO BE PLAYED: Overture to "Zampa," Louis Herold (1831)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Rachmaninoff's The Isle of the Dead, the symphonic poem he penned after seeing a reproduction of the Arnold Bocklin painting, is not something you look forward to after a tough day at the office. Nevertheless, Charles Dutoit is using the lumbering giant, in its complete and longer version, no less, to open this weekend's concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra - just one good idea on an excellently conceived program. By the time the musicians had unfolded its lugubrious lines at the opening on Thursday, everyone had stopped the lapses into daydream that plague all but the most extraordinary concert experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Good sounds are expected at the Academy of Music this afternoon, when Charles Dutoit leads the Philadelphia Orchestra in Bartok's splendid Concerto for Orchestra and pianist Louis Lortie plays the Ravel Concerto in G. But there also are excellent opportunities to hear stimulating orchestral pieces outside the city. Over in Reading, conductor Sidney Rothstein has earned a good reputation leading the 80-year-strong Reading Symphony. Rothstein hasn't been with the orchestra nearly that many years, but over the last decade he has sharpened the ensemble's skills and not been shy about playing contemporary music.
NEWS
February 24, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra will premiere three commissioned works next season as it plays its interim year without a music director. Wolfgang Sawallisch, music director-designate, and Riccardo Muti, conductor laureate, will each conduct four weeks of the subscription series in spring 1993, and Sawallisch will lead the orchestra on a three-week Asian tour in May and early June. Sawallisch also will conduct the opening gala Sept. 15, 1992, when pianist Emanuel Ax will be soloist in the Beethoven Concerto No. 5 and a "Come and Meet the Music" concert, March 15, 1993.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
On a night when the sound of thunder was drowned by the rain racketing on the metal-sheathed roof of the Mann Music Center, the Philadelphia Orchestra played Mozart. It was the first appearance with the orchestra of Canadian pianist Louis Lortie, and, somehow, a lull in the storm coincided with his performance of Mozart's Concerto in A (K. 414). In that lull, it was possible to hear in his playing a cultivated awareness of sound as an element in the shape of phrases, an easy dialogue with the orchestral instruments and a confident approach to the flow of the music.
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