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SPORTS
May 12, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looks as if money trumps mom for Major League Baseball. (Really, though, is anyone surprised by that news? Anyone? Anyone? Bud?) Players will be using pink bats on Mother's Day to bring attention to breast-cancer research (and, you know, honor mothers). The bats come from Louisville Slugger, under an ironclad agreement with MLB. Just how ironclad? Well, as the Baltimore Sun reports, Orioles outfielder Nick Markakis and Twins third baseman Trevor Plouffe, both sons of breast-cancer survivors, wanted to use black bats with pink logos from another company, Minnesota's MaxBats.
NEWS
November 14, 1986 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Louise Mintz of North Philadelphia is back in the batter's box. The 73-year-old widow and great-great-grandmother, who used an old baseball bat to knock an intruder senseless, received a new Louisville Slugger yesterday, compliments of the Guardian Civic League. "They told me that this is a souvenir now, just keep it always," said Mintz from the home on 15th Street near York, where she gave the armed man two whacks that left him in the hospital. "I'm going to get somebody to put it on the wall, so I can always see it. " The bat, marked "Louisville Slugger, Big Daddy, Slow Pitch, Official Softball," will be stationed in the bedroom, where the old one used to be. Police took the first bat for evidence Tuesday, after a man who identified himself as Sylvester Fields, 42, was charged with robbery, burglary, criminal trespass and other offenses.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
THE LOUISVILLE SLUGGER VS. THE PING DINGER Several experts tell us that the wooden baseball bat is doomed to extinction, that major league baseball players will soon be standing at home plate with aluminum bats in their hands. Baseball fans have been forced to endure countless indignities by those who just cannot leave well enough alone. Designated hitters, plastic grass, uniforms that look like pajamas, chicken clowns dancing on the baselines, and, of course, the heinous sacrilege: lights in Wrigley Field.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Is a baseball bat an instrument of crime? Some Phillies fans might think so when one of their heroes strikes out with the bases loaded, but a man convicted in an assault case had something else in mind. Ly Ngow used a baseball bat to beat a man at 5th Street and Olney Avenue in 1991, and received a jail term for possession of an instrument of crime. Ngow appealed to the state Superior Court, asking for a new trial on the grounds that because baseball bats are "not commonly used to commit crimes," they can't be considered weapons.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A baseball bat - in this case, a wooden Louisville Slugger with black tape wrapped around the handle - is an instrument of crime, a Philadelphia judge ruled yesterday. Common Pleas Court Judge Carolyn E. Temin's ruling could cost the seven young defendants charged in the November fatal beating of teenager Eddie Polec an additional five years each behind bars if convicted. In addition, the prosecutor in the case hinted that at least one defendant may have agreed to testify against the others in exchange for a reduction in the charges he faces.
SPORTS
January 14, 1998 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer correspondent Marc Narducci contributed to this article
Justin Hurst, a graduate of Lenape, took eighth place at the prestigious Midlands wrestling tournament at Northwestern University. A senior competing at 142 pounds for Rutgers, Hurst went 4-3 at that invitational, held Dec. 29-30, and is 16-5 this season. He won the Colonial Open at SUNY-Binghamton on Dec. 15 and was fifth in the Navy Classic on Dec. 22. Hurst has a 90-32 career record at Rutgers. Buena graduates Jon Forster and Paul Castellini also compete for the Scarlet Knights.
SPORTS
June 30, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
AKELEY, Pa. - The bats Ted Williams demanded, with their 25 growth rings per inch, came from the Allegheny Mountain forests that unfurl in all directions from this flyspeck Warren County town. So did the wide-grain models Pete Rose preferred and Dick Allen's 40-inch, 40-ounce wagon tongues. This vast and remote region, straddling Route 6 along the Pennsylvania-New York border, has long been the mother lode of baseball bats. For a century or more, nearly all those used by major-league hitters came from the white ash that grows and is milled in this bat belt.
SPORTS
July 11, 1996 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Philadelphia loved the All-Star Game, but the rest of the nation overwhelmingly rejected it. The overnight rating for Tuesday night's game at Veterans Stadium was the lowest ever for a prime-time All-Star Game. It was the least-watched All-Star Game in 27 years. NBC's telecast of the National League's 6-0 silencing of the alleged AL stars produced a 13.2 rating and 23 share, Nielsen Media Research said yesterday (each national point equals 959,000 homes; shares represent the percentage watching a broadcast among the television sets on at the time)
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By George F. Will
I don't want to wax mystical and metaphysical about this, but . . . Stop. I want to wax. If an American boy can't get all worked up about a genuine "powerized" Louisville Slugger baseball bat, what use is the First Amendment's guarantee of the free exercise of religion? When Thomas Aquinas was ginning up proofs of God's existence, he neglected to mention the ash tree. It is the source of the Louisville Slugger, and hence is conclusive evidence that a kindly Mind superintends the universe.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Dan Majors, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
For close to 50 years, it sat in a corner of an attic, just another dusty, forgotten piece of wood with an obscure name stamped into it: Momen Clemente. That piece of lumber - a Roberto Clemente bat from the seventh game of the 1960 World Series - was among memorabilia auctioned Thursday night at the National Sports Collectors Convention at Baltimore's Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It sold for $41,825. Other items up for bid included a loving cup given to Honus Wagner in 1917 ($44,812.50)
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SPORTS
May 14, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
GO. If you love your country, go. If you believe children should be happy, then go. The Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team plays at Patriots Park in Allentown at 5 p.m. Saturday. Proceeds benefit the WWAST kids camp, which hosts 20 amputee kids between 8-12 years old from all around the country. This year the camp is in California. Simply put, the camp brings these kids joy. It makes some of them really happy for the first time in their short lives. The camp costs about $5,000 per kid. Each kid gets to bring one parent.
SPORTS
June 30, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
AKELEY, Pa. - The bats Ted Williams demanded, with their 25 growth rings per inch, came from the Allegheny Mountain forests that unfurl in all directions from this flyspeck Warren County town. So did the wide-grain models Pete Rose preferred and Dick Allen's 40-inch, 40-ounce wagon tongues. This vast and remote region, straddling Route 6 along the Pennsylvania-New York border, has long been the mother lode of baseball bats. For a century or more, nearly all those used by major-league hitters came from the white ash that grows and is milled in this bat belt.
SPORTS
May 12, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looks as if money trumps mom for Major League Baseball. (Really, though, is anyone surprised by that news? Anyone? Anyone? Bud?) Players will be using pink bats on Mother's Day to bring attention to breast-cancer research (and, you know, honor mothers). The bats come from Louisville Slugger, under an ironclad agreement with MLB. Just how ironclad? Well, as the Baltimore Sun reports, Orioles outfielder Nick Markakis and Twins third baseman Trevor Plouffe, both sons of breast-cancer survivors, wanted to use black bats with pink logos from another company, Minnesota's MaxBats.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Dan Majors, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
For close to 50 years, it sat in a corner of an attic, just another dusty, forgotten piece of wood with an obscure name stamped into it: Momen Clemente. That piece of lumber - a Roberto Clemente bat from the seventh game of the 1960 World Series - was among memorabilia auctioned Thursday night at the National Sports Collectors Convention at Baltimore's Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It sold for $41,825. Other items up for bid included a loving cup given to Honus Wagner in 1917 ($44,812.50)
SPORTS
September 14, 2009 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
No respect for Marlins rookie Florida's Chris Coghlan got to the majors less than three years after being drafted out of college, got off to a rough start, then found his stride as a leadoff hitter. Now, with a .306 batting average and a .382 on-base percentage, he is a candidate to be named the NL rookie of the year. But there still are bumps along an otherwise seamless road. About two months into his major-league tenure, Coghlan got his first set of personalized bats from Louisville Slugger.
SPORTS
June 7, 2007 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The summer of 1998 seems a long time ago, Todd Frazier and Casey Gaynor agreed as they relaxed in the sparse lobby of a hotel in Plymouth Meeting last month before a game against Villanova. Yet the memories were fresh, and the Rutgers baseball teammates left the impression that they always would be. "It seems way in the past, but I remember it just like it was yesterday," Frazier said. "Yeah, we've gone through a lot of changes since then," Gaynor added. Frazier, a junior shortstop for the Big East Conference champion Scarlet Knights, and Gaynor, a freshman pitcher, reunited this season, nine years after they led Toms River, N.J., to the Little League World Series title with a 12-9 victory over Kashima, Japan, in Williamsport, Pa. Frazier was 12 at the time; Gaynor, 11. Frazier got the final out as a relief pitcher.
NEWS
September 13, 2006 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From his family to his teammates and coaches, past and present, Ryan Howard admits that there have been plenty of folks behind the scenes playing a role in his gargantuan season. Some people we've heard of, others we haven't. One of them is Jack Marucci, the moonlighting athletic trainer from Louisiana State University who carves the bats with which Howard has launched many of his record-breaking 56 homers that have captured the imagination of both Philadelphia and the nation.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After a long day in jail, Steve Bajewicz likes to let 'em fly at night. The 31-year-old Gloucester County corrections officer is a pitcher, manager and outfielder for a Pitman softball team. His squad, sponsored by R. Leo & Son Freezer Storage in Newfield, was one of 13 that played in last week's Gloucester County Men's Softball Tournament. The 19th annual contest at James G. Atkinson Park in Washington Township is the culmination of the season for the hundreds of softball players involved in leagues throughout the county.
SPORTS
May 4, 2001 | By Ashley McGeachy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sun peeks between two barns, sleepily rising to brighten a Churchill Downs that has been alive for hours. Everywhere, there is activity. Here, steam rises from Kentucky Derby favorite Point Given as a groom gives the colt with the championship pedigree a morning bath. There, horses carry riders to or from the track while cats scurry underfoot, and humans - fueled by adrenaline, not caffeine - ignore the earliness of the hour. It is Derby week in Louisville, a seven-day celebration of society and sport that will culminate tomorrow, as afternoon turns to evening, with 17 3-year-old horses pounding down a mile and a quarter of dirt track in about two minutes as more than 100,000 fans scream wildly.
SPORTS
July 30, 1999 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Former Great Valley and Bloomsburg standout Marty Laudato says she is having so much fun playing softball and golf that she has put on hold her career goal of becoming a marine biologist. Laudato is in her third season in the Women's Professional Softball League, and it's easy to see why she is enjoying herself. The 1988 Great Valley graduate, in her second year as the catcher for the first-place Tampa Bay FireStix (26-18), is leading the league in hitting with a .364 average and is third in both home runs (five)
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