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NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Wayne Curtis, Special to The Inquirer
There's a technique to visiting country stores in rural Maine. Unfortunately, I don't know it. When I walk into a store like Solari's, here in Fryeburg, the chattering stops and it grows unnaturally quiet. People sitting on stools and milk crates sip coffee, eat their powdered-sugar doughnuts and don't say a word. They just look at me like I've stopped in from Mars on my way to the Maine coast. I've tried most tricks. I've worn baseball caps (Red Sox) and tractor caps (John Deere)
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
France is celebrating the 200th anniversary of its premier museum, the Louvre, which opened to the public in 1793. The Bank of Paris will strike three different two-inch-diameter gold proof coins. Each will contain five ounces of gold, the heaviest legal-tender coin struck by the nation in modern times. The obverse of the first coin carries Eugene Delacroix's portrait of Liberty leading the people; the Louvre is on the reverse. The other coins will depict artworks in the Louvre: da Vinci's Mona Lisa and the ancient Greek sculpture Winged Victory of Samothrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1994 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
To help the Philadelphia Museum of Art celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Museum at the Louvre, the Ysaye Quartet from Paris played Sunday in the Art Museum's Van Pelt Auditorium. The 10-year-old ensemble, winner of the Evian competition in 1988, played music written in 1793, the year of the Louvre's founding, as well as works from 1893 and 1993. The 1993 piece was the Quartet No. 3 by 39-year-old Pascal Dusapin commissioned to mark the bicentennial. Dusapin credits Iannis Xenakis as a mentor, and this Quartet echoes some of the older composer's ideas of layering insistent rhythmic lines.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
P AULA HIAN IS a Manayunk-based fashion designer who splits time between Philly and France, where she makes her own line of knitwear for women. The sole owner of Paula Hian Designs rolls out her 2013 holiday collection for buyers next week in New York City. Hian, who grew up in Penn Valley and lives in Wayne, won an international competition in Paris for fashion students, and the winning dress is on permanent display in the Louvre. Q: What inspired you to become a fashion designer?
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By William Echikson, Special to The Inquirer
In 1546, King Francois I began building the Louvre. Future French kings added elegant hallways, sumptuous salons and palatial living rooms. Napoleon I designed an entire courtyard. Napoleon III constructed two more wings. Francois Mitterrand is just as ambitious. Over the objections of horrified traditionalists and reluctant conservative ministers, the Socialist French president is putting his own grandiose and expensive mark on the former royal palace, now one of the world's great museums.
NEWS
November 14, 1993 | By Lita and Sally Solis-Cohen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: What are the origin and value of my 9 1/4-inch diameter decorative plate with a deep-blue-and gold border? At its center is a three- quarter-length multicolored image of a young peasant woman in old-fashioned dress. She is leaning against a horse, which has baskets strapped to it. "The Milkmaiden" and "Greuze" appear on the plate's front. The words "Dresden China" are on the back. - Springfield, Pa. Answer: Your china plate, circa 1920 to 1930, which was mass-produced in Dresden, Germany, could retail for up to $300 if in good condition, according to dealer Marvin Baer of the Ivory Tower Antiques, 38 Oak St., Ridgewood, N.J. 07450 (phone 201-670-6191)
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The neo-hippie/ethnic craze that saturated London's runways wasn't much in evidence on the opening days of French spring ready-to-wear collections, which began here Wednesday. Of course, Kenzo, the Paris-based Japanese designer, showed Indian-inspired tunics, gypsy scarfs and Latin fiesta dresses, but then Kenzo has been doing folkloric clothes for 20 years. Actually, the big news isn't the clothes parade taking place within the tents in the Louvre courtyard, but the 71-foot-tall glass pyramid dominating the museum's renovated entrance.
LIVING
September 6, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey Carrie Rickey, an Inquirer movie critic, writes from time to time on art
"All modern art issues from Delacroix. " - Andres Suares Consider the self-portrait, the one from 1837 that exhibits all the attributes we associate with artistic temperament: the tousled hair of genius, the soul-penetrating gaze, the predator's nose sniffing out his quarry, the vest of hunter green that announces his passion for color. Ferdinand-Victor Eugene Delacroix declares himself forthrightly at the same time he retains his mystery. It is the multitude of things we will never know about him that makes Delacroix - in this year commemorating the 200th anniversary of his birth - a most elusive and fascinating figure.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
This story may well raise a quizzical smile. A little over 100 years ago - on Aug. 21, 1911 - Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre in Paris. The story has its hilarious aspects. No one noticed Mona was missing until the next day. But the theft may have helped bring to museums the era of modern security, "walking the fine line," as former FBI agent Robert K. Wittman puts it, "between making great art available to the public and protecting that art from the public.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | Daily News wire services
THE HAGUE DOUBTS SURROUND WAR CRIMES TRIALS In the Netherlands, the first war crimes tribunal since World War II opened yesterday amid doubt it has enough documented proof or clout to punish those guilty of atrocities in former Yugoslavia. The tribunal has no power to make suspects appear before it and is only beginning to gather evidence against them. It could be two years before the court actively process cases, and should it get suspects in custody and then convict them, no one has decided where they might be imprisoned.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2013
P AULA HIAN IS a Manayunk-based fashion designer who splits time between Philly and France, where she makes her own line of knitwear for women. The sole owner of Paula Hian Designs rolls out her 2013 holiday collection for buyers next week in New York City. Hian, who grew up in Penn Valley and lives in Wayne, won an international competition in Paris for fashion students, and the winning dress is on permanent display in the Louvre. Q: What inspired you to become a fashion designer?
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES- "Simon Killer" is an amoral tale, and a cautionary one, that reminded me my mama was right when she said, "Never talk to strangers" and "Looks can be deceiving. " What is so disturbing about this contemporary noir is that Simon could easily be mistaken for just another American college boy wandering around Paris on break, one of those troubled, slightly broken intellectual types that women are forever trying to save. The truth takes shape over time, like a shadowy figure slowly emerging from the darkness.
NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Helene Fouquet, Bloomberg News
The search for a new chief of the Louvre, the world's most visited museum, may include non-French candidates for the first time in the institution's more than 200-year history. French President Francois Hollande, faced with a shrinking budget, is casting his net wide and including foreigners among people he will consider to run the museum that's home to the Mona Lisa, Venus de Milo , and The Winged Victory of Samothrace, a French government official said. With public spending being reduced this year by $13.4 billion, the French government is putting expertise in international fund-raising high on the list of must- have skills for the person taking charge of the Louvre.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai and Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writers
For a brief period this summer, Andrea Lawton worked on the housekeeping staff of their home, according to a Bryn Mawr couple. Now, say Lower Merion police, she is suspected of cleaning them out of a rare bust of Benjamin Franklin said to be worth more than $3 million. Lawton, 46, of Philadelphia, learned her employers' routine during her month working at their residence on the 600 block of Black Rock Road, according to homeowner George A. D'Angelo. Police responded to a call by the household staff, which reported the burglary about 12:30 p.m. Friday, while he and his wife, Brenda, were not home, D'Angelo said.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
This story may well raise a quizzical smile. A little over 100 years ago - on Aug. 21, 1911 - Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre in Paris. The story has its hilarious aspects. No one noticed Mona was missing until the next day. But the theft may have helped bring to museums the era of modern security, "walking the fine line," as former FBI agent Robert K. Wittman puts it, "between making great art available to the public and protecting that art from the public.
NEWS
August 7, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
In a long-ago satiric routine called "Christ and Moses," comedian Lenny Bruce imagined Jesus and Moses returning to Earth and walking into St. Patrick's Cathedral on Fifth Avenue during a Mass. The flustered celebrant, Cardinal Francis Spellman, calls the pope for advice on how to handle the situation. Are you sure it's them? the pope asks. Yes, Spellman replies, it's Moses, and he's brought a very attractive Jewish boy with him. What Bruce, born Leonard Alfred Schneider, probably didn't know was that it was Rembrandt van Rijn who, three centuries earlier, invented the "attractive Jewish boy" as a model for depictions of Jesus.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2011
For those who aspire to travel the world to see the best collections of antiquities, artwork, or even airplanes, Cheapflights.com offers its "Top 10 Museum Cities Worldwide. " 1. Washington, D.C. - There are upwards of 30 museums. 2. Cairo -- Don't miss the Mummy Room at the Egyptian Antiquities Museum. 3. Barcelona - It's almost unfair how much amazing art is housed here. 4. New York City - The finest mile of museums in the world. 5. Vatican City - Extensive collections of the Catholic Church and Italian artists.
NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By NICOLE WINFIELD, Associated Press
ROME - Celebrated American artist Cy Twombly, whose large-scale paintings featuring scribbles, graffiti and references to ancient empires fetched millions at auction, died yesterday. He was 83. Twombly, who had cancer, died in Rome, said Eric Mezil, director of the Lambert Collection in Avignon, France, where the artist opened a show in June. Twombly had lived in Italy since 1957. "A great American painter who deeply loved old Europe has just left us," French Culture Minister Frederic Mitterrand said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's 1911 and someone has stolen the Mona Lisa from the Louvre - and that's no fiction. Vincenzo Peruggia, once a workman at the museum, took Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece from its case, hid it under his clothing, and left undetected. According to Art Lover , Jules Tasca's new play running through the weekend as part of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, the Italian immigrant - bedazzled by the painting and obsessed with the woman it depicts - kept Mona Lisa for two years in the shabby Paris apartment he shared with a former prostitute he'd fallen for. Peruggia said she reminded him of the woman in the painting.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
WHEN op-ed writer Louis Lombardi suggests the absurdity of moving the Louvre from Paris, he inadvertently makes the perfect case for moving the Barnes to the Parkway. Suppose the Louvre was cloistered in an exclusive suburb unreachable for most of the world? Suppose you could only attend by advance reservation? Suppose it was open only a few days a week? Other than the elites with time and money on their hands, no one would go and no one would be enlightened. As for the Barnes legacy, times change.
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