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Love And Death

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Love and Death, Boris Grushenko awaits his execution, but he is not about to just march meekly before the firing squad. "I have to go at 6 a.m.," explains Boris. "It was 5 a.m., but I have a good lawyer. " This is one of a salvo of sallies launched in Love and Death, a vibrant comedy and brilliant parody that was released in 1975 and turned out to be a turning point in the writing and directing career of Woody Allen. The movie forms a bridge between the riotous comedy of Bananas and Sleeper and Allen's more ambitious and accomplished work in the late '70s with such achievements as Annie Hall and Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Back in the days when Woody Allen made unadulterated (but adulterous) comedies, two of his funniest were Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask) (1972) and Love and Death (1975). They mark his transition from the parodist to filmmaker. Everything . . ., a hilarious riff on Dr. David Reuben's self-help book, has seven different episodes, each shot in the style of a different director. A personal favorite is the Stanley Kubrick-style futuristic sequence with Burt Reynolds as a reluctant sperm.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Had Thomas Mann gone to the multiplex and not to the city of canals, he might have created Love and Death on Long Island, in which an English literary lion is tamed and felled by American trash culture. This slender comedy based on the novel by London film critic Gilbert Adair stars John Hurt as Giles De'Ath (Day-Awth to you), a widowed novelist who might as well be living in the 18th century for all he knows about the 20th. Although he doesn't write with a quill pen, Giles scribbles in longhand and for the most part lives in his head, a tidy place where ideas drive out feelings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sad and troubled folk whose lives intersect seemingly by chance - it's the stuff of Robert Altman (Short Cuts) and Paul Thomas Anderson (Magnolia), Michael Winterbottom (Wonderland), and Paul Haggis (Crash). And of Sarah Watt, the Australian writer-director behind the melancholy yet hopeful Look Both Ways. Set in a sun-dappled Down Under town, this meditative look at tragedy and toughing it out revolves around a newspaper photographer, Nick (William McInnes), just found to have cancer, and a moody artist, Meryl (Justine Clarke)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"Getting involved," declares the young hustler who works the gay districts of Montreal, "is what I do for a living. " In Jean Beaudin's Being at Home With Claude, one night of passionate involvement leads to somebody dying. Based on the consciously claustrophobic play by Rene-Daniel Dubois, Beaudin's film - which will be shown tonight in the Philadelphia International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival - is an ambitious exercise in that psychological subgenre of mystery, the whydunit.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
Singer Julee Cruise is nothing to get excited about - and apparently she means to keep it that way. Cruise's cameo appearances on Twin Peaks as Faux Chanteuse has made her an unlikely cult item. Her collaborations with David Lynch and composer Angelo Badalamenti have yielded two curious soundtrack LPs and her solo debut Floating Into the Night (Warner Bros.) that could pass for lullabies for the living dead. Last night at the Theater of the Living Arts, Cruise and her five-piece synth-heavy band spun a 70-minute set that at times seemed poised to conjure up minimalist dreamscapes, but only managed to summon a soporific void.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Like his resonant, incandescent Lips Together, Teeth Apart, Terrence McNally's Love! Valour! Compassion! brings a group of friends together in an isolated setting on a national holiday - three holidays, in fact, since the new play transpires successively over the weekends of Memorial Day, Independence Day and Labor Day. Like Lips Together, too, Love! Valour! Compassion! makes much of the mysterious properties of water and darkness, agents of both infection and healing. It is set on a lake, invisible but demonstrably wet below an upstage raft, and concludes in the soft glow of a huge moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Feather-light and ticklishly funny, Manhattan Murder Mystery is a farce in the howdunit spirit of The Thin Man. OK, The Thin Man minus six martinis and plus 12 cups of high-test espresso; so jittery are the amateur sleuths who suspect a neighbor has committed foul play that soon the audience is as frantic as they are. This Woody Allen comedy crammed with one-liners and dizzy with slapstick revisits the filmmaker's pet themes, love and death,...
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Critic
Seeing The Two Mrs. Grenvilles pop up on television during the February "sweeps" is like finding romance under a full moon. This mini-series fits its time period so precisely it could stand as a model of video design. The sweeps are four-week periods, notably in February and November, when networks and stations are at their most competitive, seeking ratings with even more zeal and energy than usual. Since most viewers, like the girls in Cyndi Lauper's famous song, just want to have fun, it's hard to think of a more appropriate offering for a sweeps month than The Two Mrs. Grenvilles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A feature created by American Indians tops this week's list of new movies on video. Smoke Signals 1/2 (1998) (Miramax) 89 minutes. Adam Beach, Evan Adams, Gary Farmer, Tanto Cardinal, Irene Bedard. The first widely distributed feature film written and directed by American Indians musters bitter laughter rather than the rage one might expect. A deft balance of tragedy and comedy, this unique picture is appealing, assured, and a work that shows us - in more than one sense - what we have been missing.
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NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer and Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writers
The deadly confrontation in Berlin Borough where one man shot another with a bow and arrow was the culmination of a peculiar feud, a Superior Court judge in Camden heard Wednesday. It was a tangled tale: A spurned lover trying to reclaim the affections of a woman; a threat by that man to infect someone with HIV; allegations of stalking; a history of drug abuse - and the fatal intervention of another man. The drama came to a head Monday night outside a tidy split-level in the shadow of a concrete plant.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
* STEEL MAGNOLIAS. 9 p.m. Sunday, Lifetime. WHEN I first heard Lifetime was remaking "Steel Magnolias," a movie I happily left behind in the theater in 1989 and hadn't rewatched all the way through until this week, I thought: Why bother? I vaguely remembered the star-studded original, perhaps a little unfairly, as an over-the-top, Southern-fried weepfest. But plenty of other women loved it, and probably wouldn't take kindly to anyone messing with it. It's a good thing, then, that Lifetime wasn't messing around with just anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sad and troubled folk whose lives intersect seemingly by chance - it's the stuff of Robert Altman (Short Cuts) and Paul Thomas Anderson (Magnolia), Michael Winterbottom (Wonderland), and Paul Haggis (Crash). And of Sarah Watt, the Australian writer-director behind the melancholy yet hopeful Look Both Ways. Set in a sun-dappled Down Under town, this meditative look at tragedy and toughing it out revolves around a newspaper photographer, Nick (William McInnes), just found to have cancer, and a moody artist, Meryl (Justine Clarke)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A feature created by American Indians tops this week's list of new movies on video. Smoke Signals 1/2 (1998) (Miramax) 89 minutes. Adam Beach, Evan Adams, Gary Farmer, Tanto Cardinal, Irene Bedard. The first widely distributed feature film written and directed by American Indians musters bitter laughter rather than the rage one might expect. A deft balance of tragedy and comedy, this unique picture is appealing, assured, and a work that shows us - in more than one sense - what we have been missing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Had Thomas Mann gone to the multiplex and not to the city of canals, he might have created Love and Death on Long Island, in which an English literary lion is tamed and felled by American trash culture. This slender comedy based on the novel by London film critic Gilbert Adair stars John Hurt as Giles De'Ath (Day-Awth to you), a widowed novelist who might as well be living in the 18th century for all he knows about the 20th. Although he doesn't write with a quill pen, Giles scribbles in longhand and for the most part lives in his head, a tidy place where ideas drive out feelings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Love and Death, Boris Grushenko awaits his execution, but he is not about to just march meekly before the firing squad. "I have to go at 6 a.m.," explains Boris. "It was 5 a.m., but I have a good lawyer. " This is one of a salvo of sallies launched in Love and Death, a vibrant comedy and brilliant parody that was released in 1975 and turned out to be a turning point in the writing and directing career of Woody Allen. The movie forms a bridge between the riotous comedy of Bananas and Sleeper and Allen's more ambitious and accomplished work in the late '70s with such achievements as Annie Hall and Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"Getting involved," declares the young hustler who works the gay districts of Montreal, "is what I do for a living. " In Jean Beaudin's Being at Home With Claude, one night of passionate involvement leads to somebody dying. Based on the consciously claustrophobic play by Rene-Daniel Dubois, Beaudin's film - which will be shown tonight in the Philadelphia International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival - is an ambitious exercise in that psychological subgenre of mystery, the whydunit.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Like his resonant, incandescent Lips Together, Teeth Apart, Terrence McNally's Love! Valour! Compassion! brings a group of friends together in an isolated setting on a national holiday - three holidays, in fact, since the new play transpires successively over the weekends of Memorial Day, Independence Day and Labor Day. Like Lips Together, too, Love! Valour! Compassion! makes much of the mysterious properties of water and darkness, agents of both infection and healing. It is set on a lake, invisible but demonstrably wet below an upstage raft, and concludes in the soft glow of a huge moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Shakespeare's Henry V is a warrior king of reckless bravery, and many skeptics thought Kenneth Branagh exhibited the same rash bravado when he offered his film of the play in 1989. The reason for their doubts lay in the brilliant version that Laurence Olivier made as a patriotic rallying cry for Britons during World War II. Branagh's superb revisionist interpretation, in stark contrast to Olivier's bellicose reading, is an anti-war view of the play. The film, directed with supple rhythm by Branagh himself, is not a march of triumph over the odds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Feather-light and ticklishly funny, Manhattan Murder Mystery is a farce in the howdunit spirit of The Thin Man. OK, The Thin Man minus six martinis and plus 12 cups of high-test espresso; so jittery are the amateur sleuths who suspect a neighbor has committed foul play that soon the audience is as frantic as they are. This Woody Allen comedy crammed with one-liners and dizzy with slapstick revisits the filmmaker's pet themes, love and death,...
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