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Love Potion

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FOOD
February 13, 2002 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
I took my troubles down to Madame Ruth You know, that gypsy with the gold-capped tooth She's got a pad down on 34th and Vine Sellin' little bottles of Love Potion No. 9. - The Coasters The Coasters (and later the Searchers) had Madame Ruth. But who, I wondered, is brewing the hottest love potion in Philly? It's no hypothetical question, considering that tomorrow is Valentine's Day. And whether or not you've made restaurant reservations, planned a special dinner at home, or bought your sweetheart a box of chocolates - and especially if your answer is no to all three - it can't hurt to have an easy seduction secret up your sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
LAST WEEK, four cans of a trendy new aphrodisiac drink called Herbn Love arrived at my apartment. I didn't know what to do with them. Let's backtrack. A few days before, I saw Channel 10 reporter Cherie Bank interview local bar-goers and sex-perts about the recently launched love potion. The organic concoction was created in Southern California and made in Wisconsin. All agreed the stuff just might work. So I checked out Herbn Love's Web site, where I found a glowing heart, soft porn soundtrack, exotic-sounding list of herbs like damiana leaf, muira-puama, tribulus, astragalus and guarana, and the words, "Can an herbal supplement drink make you irresistible?"
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
CHOLESTEROL DRUGS Drugs that lower your cholesterol could lower your life expectancy. That's according to a study in the British Medical Journal that found that such drugs reduced heart disease deaths but could increase the risk of death from non- coronary causes. "If anything, overall death rates have been increased among those taking the drugs," researchers say. They recommend lowering cholesterol by dietary change and not giving drugs to patients without a markedly elevated risk of coronary disease until major clinical trials show they "they produce an overall benefit.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
The grammar schoolers were spreading the Black Plague. Ragged 11th graders begged for spare change. And a school director in sequined armor strutted as if the Crusades were a current event. In a way, they were. Such was the scene Tuesday on the green athletic fields of Moorestown Friends School. It was May Day, the anniversary of one of the private school's oldest traditions, which happens every four years. In observance of this festival of spring, the school's 500 students donned burlap and satin and impersonated denizens of the Dark Ages from morning until the dismissal bell chimed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2012 | Steven Rea
Reprinted from Friday's editions. By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC If you're going to serve up an old fairy tale, you may as well make it look dazzling. And Tarsem Singh, the director of Mirror Mirror, has certainly done that. From its "once upon a time" animated intro to its swooping views of a golden-domed castle perched atop a precipice, to the bellowslike stilts worn by a certain septet of little people in this new take on the old Snow White yarn, everything looks, well, fantastic.
NEWS
January 12, 1987 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Some sex researchers say they have found that rock music leads to the downfall of many young ladies. The provocative lyrics and pervasive rhythms make some girls forget the warnings their mothers gave them. If this is true, it is another example of the push-button ease to which today's youth have become accustomed. Young men have always sought ways to make young ladies abandon virtue. Past generations have stood beneath balconies reciting poetry. Others penned passionate letters or learned a slinky tango.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
"I took my troubles down to Madame Ruth. You know, the gypsy with the gold- capped tooth. She read my palm and she made a magic sign. She said what I needed was . . . Love Potion # 9. " "Love Potion # 9," sung by the Clovers I am an honest person, friendly and generous. I never turn my back on anyone who needs help, but my kindness is not repaid. I have a quick temper, but my anger doesn't last long. I like fun and music and have good luck with women, except for right now. I don't like working for other people.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Michael Harrington
Sunday Antic farm Shostakovich wrote three ballets from 1929 to 1935, each getting him deeper in trouble with the Soviet authorities, each banned shortly after it premiered, each eventually contributing to his falling out of favor with Stalin and the denunciation of his work in 1936. The finale of the trio, The Bright Stream, despite being set on a collective farm (and having a comic plot in which a troupe of sophisticated dancers are shown up by the bumpkin workers), was the subject of a pointed and threatening article in Pravda (even more to the point, one co-librettist, Adrian Piotrovsky, was sent to the gulag and disappeared)
NEWS
April 26, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opera would seem to have taken a belated cue from arena rock concerts: "The Tristan Project," which plays at Lincoln Center Wednesday and Saturday after stops in Paris and Los Angeles, presents Wagner's majestic masterpiece Tristan und Isolde in a concert performance with a huge video screen in lieu of a conventional production. But while rock concerts simply magnify the onstage action, the "Tristan" screen presents an entirely different world. In a four-hour video created over the course of a year by the noted California-based artist Bill Viola (whose work is usually seen at the J. Paul Getty Museum)
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NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Michael Harrington
Sunday Antic farm Shostakovich wrote three ballets from 1929 to 1935, each getting him deeper in trouble with the Soviet authorities, each banned shortly after it premiered, each eventually contributing to his falling out of favor with Stalin and the denunciation of his work in 1936. The finale of the trio, The Bright Stream, despite being set on a collective farm (and having a comic plot in which a troupe of sophisticated dancers are shown up by the bumpkin workers), was the subject of a pointed and threatening article in Pravda (even more to the point, one co-librettist, Adrian Piotrovsky, was sent to the gulag and disappeared)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2012 | Steven Rea
Reprinted from Friday's editions. By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC If you're going to serve up an old fairy tale, you may as well make it look dazzling. And Tarsem Singh, the director of Mirror Mirror, has certainly done that. From its "once upon a time" animated intro to its swooping views of a golden-domed castle perched atop a precipice, to the bellowslike stilts worn by a certain septet of little people in this new take on the old Snow White yarn, everything looks, well, fantastic.
NEWS
April 26, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opera would seem to have taken a belated cue from arena rock concerts: "The Tristan Project," which plays at Lincoln Center Wednesday and Saturday after stops in Paris and Los Angeles, presents Wagner's majestic masterpiece Tristan und Isolde in a concert performance with a huge video screen in lieu of a conventional production. But while rock concerts simply magnify the onstage action, the "Tristan" screen presents an entirely different world. In a four-hour video created over the course of a year by the noted California-based artist Bill Viola (whose work is usually seen at the J. Paul Getty Museum)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
LAST WEEK, four cans of a trendy new aphrodisiac drink called Herbn Love arrived at my apartment. I didn't know what to do with them. Let's backtrack. A few days before, I saw Channel 10 reporter Cherie Bank interview local bar-goers and sex-perts about the recently launched love potion. The organic concoction was created in Southern California and made in Wisconsin. All agreed the stuff just might work. So I checked out Herbn Love's Web site, where I found a glowing heart, soft porn soundtrack, exotic-sounding list of herbs like damiana leaf, muira-puama, tribulus, astragalus and guarana, and the words, "Can an herbal supplement drink make you irresistible?"
FOOD
February 13, 2002 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
I took my troubles down to Madame Ruth You know, that gypsy with the gold-capped tooth She's got a pad down on 34th and Vine Sellin' little bottles of Love Potion No. 9. - The Coasters The Coasters (and later the Searchers) had Madame Ruth. But who, I wondered, is brewing the hottest love potion in Philly? It's no hypothetical question, considering that tomorrow is Valentine's Day. And whether or not you've made restaurant reservations, planned a special dinner at home, or bought your sweetheart a box of chocolates - and especially if your answer is no to all three - it can't hurt to have an easy seduction secret up your sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Imagine a handsome young tenor, cruelly widowed, who finds new love on, of all places, the opera stage. Someone ought to make a movie of that. Well, they already have - in the telecast of Donizetti's L'Elisir d'Amore to be seen at 9 tonight on Channel 12. The production, from the National Opera in Lyon, casts tenor Roberto Alagna as the rustic bumbler, Nemorino, and soprano Angela Gheorghiu as his haughty love, Adina. To make sure listeners are clued in, the two giggle through a quick interview before the curtain goes up. Alagna, a 1988 winner of the Opera Company of Philadelphia/Luciano Pavarotti International Voice Competition, nudges his wife and says that they had drunk the elixir of love of the opera's title.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
It costs about $9.50 per pill. But on a steamy Saturday night when the mood is right, its street value would be considerably higher. It's called Viagra, a potent cure-all for male impotence that has the potential to become one of the best-selling drugs on the market, according to pharmaceutical analysts. The small, blue prescription pill, which has been tested in Philadelphia and across the country, is expected to gain FDA approval within the next week. The pill stimulates the ability, for up to six hours, to have an erection in men who otherwise wouldn't be able to perform.
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
CHOLESTEROL DRUGS Drugs that lower your cholesterol could lower your life expectancy. That's according to a study in the British Medical Journal that found that such drugs reduced heart disease deaths but could increase the risk of death from non- coronary causes. "If anything, overall death rates have been increased among those taking the drugs," researchers say. They recommend lowering cholesterol by dietary change and not giving drugs to patients without a markedly elevated risk of coronary disease until major clinical trials show they "they produce an overall benefit.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
The grammar schoolers were spreading the Black Plague. Ragged 11th graders begged for spare change. And a school director in sequined armor strutted as if the Crusades were a current event. In a way, they were. Such was the scene Tuesday on the green athletic fields of Moorestown Friends School. It was May Day, the anniversary of one of the private school's oldest traditions, which happens every four years. In observance of this festival of spring, the school's 500 students donned burlap and satin and impersonated denizens of the Dark Ages from morning until the dismissal bell chimed.
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