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Love Songs

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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Bruce Cockburn's a word man. The 46-year-old Canadian singer plays a fine, bristling guitar, but music nearly always seems secondary to lyrics in the conception of his songs. When he has something to get his dander up, that's fine. Cockburn's world view is more thought-through than any politically minded pop songsmith this side of Billy Bragg, and nearly all of the gripping moments at the Keswick Theater Thursday night came when he was looking injustice in the eye, and seething.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1993 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One fine day, the Mekons will get their due. Some patient archivist will piece together the past of the lovably anarchic collective from Leeds, England, and a major label will issue a beautiful box set devoted to their glorious ongoing history. They'll call it The Mekons: The World's Most Resilient Rock and Roll Band. It'll begin with the group's late '70s days as punk-rock noisemakers, when legendary critic Lester Bangs doomed it to be a critics' fave forever when he called the band "the finest artists ever to have graced this somewhat degenerate form with the grace of their artistic sensibilities.
NEWS
February 16, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
As a musical Valentine's Day outing, there could be no finer entertainment than hearing Rufus and Martha Wainwright do their skewered love songs in a solo setting. He's chamber pop's gay-iconic darling, currently charged with writing his first opera; she's cabaret-folk's reigning chanteuse - and they usually don't perform together. On Saturday at the Kimmel Center, the brother and sister - stripped of their ornamental arrangements and accompanists - allowed their smartly told tales of messy romance, personal politics, and operas real and imagined to ring out. The event was sumptuous, what with the greatest range of Martha's high, dynamic whine and Rufus' sliding trombone tenor at full tilt.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Music Critic
With songs that probe the cuts and salves of love, and draw the important distinction between happy and content, Richard Thompson probably hits more exposed nerves per minute than anyone else in popular music. But he doesn't just offer the cursory acidic phrase and flee: With his guitar as navigational tool, Thompson creates expressive, inescapable moods, and exhausts the possibilities of each feeling. His fully considered songs are just about definitive: When he's finished with "Tear-Stained Letter," for example, there's not much to add on the subject of heartbroken correspondence.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"Tonight, my roots are showing," Joni Mitchell told the small but enthusiastic crowd at Camden's Waterfront Entertainment Centre Friday night. She wasn't talking hair color. Though Mitchell is known for her exacting accounts of the raptures and agonies of love, she's always been a student of jazz and classic torch song, and has allowed those languages to enrich her compositions. After winding through the languid opener "You're My Thrill" with a 70-piece orchestra, she explained that on her most recent album, Both Sides Now, and this tour, her idea was to use standards, and several of her own songs, to trace the arc of a relationship from first flicker to final ember.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
In the late 1800s, Harvard University professor Frances James Child collected hundreds of lyrics and poems from the British ballad tradition. Published as Popular English and Scottish Ballads , they became known as the Child Ballads. The collection - five volumes of variations of 305 story-songs - has influenced generations of artists, from Bob Dylan and Joan Baez to Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span to the Decemberists and Fleet Foxes. Anaïs Mitchell and Jefferson Hamer recorded seven of them for their new album, also called Child Ballads , and their understated, direct approach stresses the captivating narratives of songs such as "Tamlin" and "Sir Patrick Spens.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | BY DON WILLIAMSON
Yesterday, I got a year older. It was one of those milestone birthdays that provides the opportunity to see just how close you are to where you thought you would be when you got this far. Obviously, I never became a professional athlete, didn't make it as a star on stage, in the movies or in television. Public office eluded me, and the likelihood of international acclaim diminishes daily. The things I used to do, some I don't do as well, as long or as often. Other things I do better or have learned are really not worth doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2001 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
DESPERATE TIMES call for desperate measures, apparently. Rocker/actress Courtney Love was not - we repeat NOT! - going to let some silly rules get in the way of her songs being heard by a record exec. So, after Love's Hollywood Bowl show was cut short Saturday night by local noise ordinances, she turned to less glitzy ambiance: the bathroom. "Love was understandably disappointed that she was not able to complete her set, only singing two of the four new songs she planned on debuting that night," publicist Tas Steiner said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"This is the one that got me started on these durn love songs. And that's about all there is," a laughing Emmylou Harris said at the Keswick Theatre on Sunday, before revisiting Felice and Boudleaux Bryant's "Love Hurts. " And durn it, that is about all there was: nearly two hours of sad love songs drawn from a career that Harris began as Gram Parsons' musical consort in the early 1970s and that has lately taken her in the direction of the moody, atmospheric Red Dirt Girl (Nonesuch)
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
He was staring morosely into his beer and every so often he'd sigh deeply. The bartender was too smart to ask him what the problem was. But I wasn't. What's bothering you? I asked. He shook his head and said: "I just ended a . . . we just ended . . . " And his voice choked and cracked. Ended what? "We ended . . . a . . . relationship. " A relationship? "Yeah. She broke off our . . . relationship. " I bought him a beer, advised him not to let life wear him down, and quickly moved on. I'm not without sympathy, but I hate the word "relationship.
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NEWS
February 21, 2016
Victorious (EMI/Ume ***) After that metal mess of a performance from the Hollywood Vampires at the Grammys last week (Alice Cooper, yes; Johnny Depp, no), it's good to hear that cleaving heavy rawk isn't just for dilettantes - that Australia's Wolfmother and leader Andrew Stockdale have something to say on the matter. Sure, that might seem a wee disingenuous, considering Stockdale's interchangeable band has done little but ape Blue Cheer and regurgitate aged Zep and Sabbath riffs since its 2004 debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
On Valentine's Day 2014, Adrien Reju played a set of what she called "unconventional love songs" at the Fire. The singer-songwriter covered songs by Sonny Bono, Lou Reed, Skeeter Davis, and others, and the show sent her down the path that led to her second full-length album, Strange Love and the Secret Language . "My choices for that show were a little more wacky or quirky," says Reju, who will perform a solo show Friday night at Burlap &...
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. - By the time Kevin Allred walked in, his students had just finished discussing the day's reading on black feminism and Billie Holiday, had tied the ideas to some of Beyoncé's work, and had begun analyzing the identity politics in her songs and videos. For what looks at first glance like just a fun undergraduate class at Rutgers University on the reigning queen of pop, his students sure were going above and Beyoncé. As Kanye West rapped in the background, Allred began discussing his latest album, Yeezus , comparing it with My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy ("So good")
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
On "I Never Wear White," a track from Tales From the Realm of the Queen of Pentacles , her first album of new material in seven years, Suzanne Vega refers to herself as "the poet of the dark. " The song is surprisingly gritty, with an edgy electric-guitar riff from producer and collaborator Gerry Leonard. "Black is the truth/ of my situation,/ and for those of my station/ in life. All other colors lie," she sings. It might be more apt to call Vega, whose first album came out in 1985, a poet of the true.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
So just what is The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller ? Even director Sam Green, the creative force behind the evening of entertainment that has sold out two shows at FringeArts on Friday, isn't quite sure what to call it. "I use different terms," the filmmaker said. "At a film festival, I'll call it a 'live documentary.' At a museum, it's a 'performance.' And I've also done shows at libraries. There, I'll just call it a 'fancy lecture.' Which it is. It's a lecture with a band.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
In the late 1800s, Harvard University professor Frances James Child collected hundreds of lyrics and poems from the British ballad tradition. Published as Popular English and Scottish Ballads , they became known as the Child Ballads. The collection - five volumes of variations of 305 story-songs - has influenced generations of artists, from Bob Dylan and Joan Baez to Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span to the Decemberists and Fleet Foxes. Anaïs Mitchell and Jefferson Hamer recorded seven of them for their new album, also called Child Ballads , and their understated, direct approach stresses the captivating narratives of songs such as "Tamlin" and "Sir Patrick Spens.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
Tooth & Nail (Cooking Vinyl ***) The first album in five years by the bard of Barking, Essex, is a largely subdued affair that plays to Billy Bragg's underrated strengths as a writer of tender, subtly revealing love songs. Bragg is best known as a political firebrand and the guy who collaborated with Wilco on the Woody Guthrie project Mermaid Avenue . Tooth & Nail is produced by Joe Henry and features a stellar band of backing musicians, including pedal steel player Greg Leisz.
REAL_ESTATE
February 10, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The passion for collecting can be a happy diversion. It also can quickly turn into a space invader. And when you happen to own what is believed to be the largest private sheet-music collection in the world, as Sandy Marrone does, space becomes an overwhelming challenge. It all began 38 years ago, when Marrone was seeking a diversion beyond her work as a photojournalist for Penn Mutual in Philadelphia and as a new mother. She had energy to spare. Soon, passion turned into magnificent obsession, as the sheet-music collection morphed into a thriving business, with collectors flocking to her. Five years ago, when Sandy and her husband, Dennis, looked around at their two-story house in the Cinnamon Hill section of Cinnaminson, one word flashed: "Basement!"
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
  M   OSHE BENABOU , a former bodyguard for Justin Bieber, sued the pop superstar Thursday, seeking more than $420,000 in overtime and other wages and claiming that the singer repeatedly struck him during an October incident. Benabou's suit alleges that Bieber berated him and repeatedly punched him in the chest after a disagreement about how to handle a member of the singer's entourage. After he walked away, Bieber fired him, the suit claims. Benabou claims that he was mistakenly told that he wasn't entitled to receive OT despite having worked 14- to 18-hour days between March 2011 and October 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The Wonderettes made their first appearance with 11th Hour Theatre Company back in June. Then, the quartet was the Marvelous Wonderettes, a nostalgia trip to the 1950s and '60s whose conceit was a last-minute girl-group substitution for a canceled boys' glee club performance. Now, they're Winter Wonderettes, still in beehives, go-go boots, and cat's-eye frames, trading on nostalgia - this time, for the ghosts of Christmases past - while filling in for a missing Santa at Harper's Hardware Holiday Party.
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