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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tisha Campbell, singer and star of the new movie Sprung, has a lot to say about Martin. "We just got married Aug. 17," she says of her husband, Duane Martin, a basketball player and actor she met at an audition almost seven years ago. Not that Martin. "The best thing about Martin is that Tichina and I became even closer than we were," says Campbell, referring to her best friend, Tichina Arnold, who played Pam on the Fox sitcom and is Campbell's duet partner on the Sprung sound track.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Never thought I would read the following sentence, let alone write it. For a film about suicides, Wristcutters: A Love Story is strangely life-affirming. This film about slackers stuck in limbo between life and death is upbeat in an offbeat way. In its opening sequence a depressive dude named Zia (Patrick Fugit, the almost famous star of Almost Famous) morosely cleans his apartment and proceeds to commit the act referenced by the title. But instead of curling up under the oblivion blanket, Zia is stranded in the afterlife.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1987 | By KAY GARDELLA, New York Daily News
Television is easing into the big ratings month, November, known as a sweeps period (when ratings accrued translate to future ad rates), with what I call warmup films. They're not good enough for the hot sweeps competition but are good enough to keep viewers entertained for a couple of hours. One such film is CBS' "Conspiracy of Love" (tomorrow at 9 p.m. on Ch. 10) starring 12-year-old Drew Barrymore as Jody, the focus of a tug of war between her devoted grandparents, played by Robert Young and Elizabeth Wilson, and her deserted mother (Glynnis O'Connor)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Shopgirl, Claire Danes is Mirabelle Buttersfield, a displaced Vermonter, an artist, a twentysomething salesgirl at the gloves counter on the couture floor of Saks in Beverly Hills. She can stand idle for hours, interrupted by the occasional shopper looking for evening gloves to go with that Oscar de la Renta gown. And then one day Mirabelle is interrupted by a nice enough man of middle age, apparently out to buy a present for his wife or girlfriend. He's not sure if he should choose gray or black.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
We shouldn't have to tell you this, but here's a word of advice for guys who might be curious: Don't make love to a vacuum cleaner. It sucks! Alas, some lonesome fellow - from Long Branch, N.J., of all places - decided to date his Hoover. Of course, he was only in it for the sex. So it did what any upright appliance would do - it severed the relationship. And that's how a 51-year-old man became less of a man - and nearly bled to death in a bizarre mechanical love tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1992 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Interracial love is the sensitive subject of the film that leads this week's list of new home video. MISSISSIPPI MASALA 1/2 (1992) (Columbia TriStar) 118 minutes. Denzel Washington, Sarita Choudhury. An exuberant film by Salaam Bombay! director Mira Nair, this is an exotic and erotic love story about an interracial couple - a black American who has never seen Africa and an African-born Indian who has never seen her native land - whose cultures have more in common than they ever imagined.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By SARAKAY SMULLENS
THIS IS a valentine to Philadelphia and our Kimmel Center. Even cynics should forgive me, remembering the day. In truth, I can't help myself. I love the center because it is majestic. I love it because the lifeblood of so many marvelous Philadelphians is in it, enriching its soul and strengthening it. I love it because it's world-class. I love it because we did it - against great odds - when so many said we couldn't. Of course, no love is perfect, and this includes the Kimmel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If the course of true love never did run smooth, then what of the course of true loathe? A Fish in the Bathtub, a ruefully funny film starring Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara as Sam and Molly, squabblers closing in on their 40th anniversary, suggests loathing is a knotty form of love. Can this marriage be saved? Or must it first be detangled? The film's title refers to a large carp that irascible Sam brings home one night and parks in the tub. The fish is not a symbol. It is a symptom.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
About 20 years ago, filmmaker Stephen Frears and screenwriter Christopher Hampton adapted the novel Dangerous Liaisons . From Choderos de Laclos' defining document of 18th-century French literature, they spun a movie that brilliantly contrasted the cynics, who play love as a sport, against the romantics, visibly elevated by the union of two souls. Lightning does not strike again with Chéri . Frears and Hampton's version of Colette's heartrending novels - Chéri and The Return of Chéri - about a young man initiated by an older woman in the teens of the 20th century is surprisingly flat.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
MARION COTILLARD has been working as an actress since she was a teenager, but it was her Oscar-winning performance as Edith Piaf in "La Vie en Rose" that brought her to the attention of American audiences - and Hollywood filmmakers. Since then she's worked with directors such as Michael Mann ("Public Enemies"), Woody Allen ("Midnight in Paris"), Steven Soderbergh ("Contagion") and Christopher Nolan ("Inception," "The Dark Knight Rises"). In "Rust and Bone," she returns to France for an intimate relationship movie about a whale trainer and the fighter who sort of nurses her back to health after an accident at the Sea World-like water show where she works.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
In the fall of 2008, filmmaker Daniel Meirom turned a group of Camden teenagers loose on the streets with handheld cameras they used to interview friends, neighbors, parents, local historians, and people they met along the way. The goal was for the students to use their burgeoning filmmaking skills to learn about their city's past, present, and future. But over the years the project morphed into a full-fledged documentary in which they were both stars and collaborators. The final product, a 75-minute film called Camden Love Hate , was completed earlier this year by Meirom and Ron Lipsky, who codirected and coproduced.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, Staff Writer
Officiant: The Rev. Andrew Jamieson, pastor of the Church of the Holy Eucharist, Tabernacle, N.J. Venues: Ceremony, St. Paul Parish, Philadelphia; reception, Atrium at Curtis Center, Philadelphia. Catering: Renee Ziegler, event manager, Cescaphe Event Group, Philadelphia. Photography: Gabe Fredericks of Philip Gabriel Photography, Media. Videographer: Allure Films, Havertown. Flowers: Vito Russo, Carl Alan Floral Designs Ltd., Philadelphia. Dress: Designed by David Tutera, purchased at Simplicity Boutique, Haddon Heights.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | Rathe Miller, for The Inquirer
Ben Newman of Levittown and Ally O'Rourke-Barrett of Yardley are dating. From the more than 3,000 paintings at the Barnes, Newman and O'Rourke-Barrett - he's a techie, she's a teacher - independently picked the same painting as their favorite: Amedeo Modigliani's Readheaded Girl in Evening Dress, from 1918. They stood before the enigmatic lady, discussing her appeal. O'Rourke-Barrett: I just can't stop looking at it. I love the blue and the red against each other. The colors are my favorite part.
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | DEATH A love story Anyone who wishes to understand the meaning of true love should read Kerry McKean Kelly's moving remembrance of times spent with her husband, Steve, between his cancer diagnosis and untimely passing ("What cancer can't take away," April 17 ). The manner in which she recounts her experiences - at once life-altering and life-affirming - captures the essence of a committed relationship. Patrick J. Hagan, Ardmore
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