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Love Story

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tisha Campbell, singer and star of the new movie Sprung, has a lot to say about Martin. "We just got married Aug. 17," she says of her husband, Duane Martin, a basketball player and actor she met at an audition almost seven years ago. Not that Martin. "The best thing about Martin is that Tichina and I became even closer than we were," says Campbell, referring to her best friend, Tichina Arnold, who played Pam on the Fox sitcom and is Campbell's duet partner on the Sprung sound track.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Never thought I would read the following sentence, let alone write it. For a film about suicides, Wristcutters: A Love Story is strangely life-affirming. This film about slackers stuck in limbo between life and death is upbeat in an offbeat way. In its opening sequence a depressive dude named Zia (Patrick Fugit, the almost famous star of Almost Famous) morosely cleans his apartment and proceeds to commit the act referenced by the title. But instead of curling up under the oblivion blanket, Zia is stranded in the afterlife.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1987 | By KAY GARDELLA, New York Daily News
Television is easing into the big ratings month, November, known as a sweeps period (when ratings accrued translate to future ad rates), with what I call warmup films. They're not good enough for the hot sweeps competition but are good enough to keep viewers entertained for a couple of hours. One such film is CBS' "Conspiracy of Love" (tomorrow at 9 p.m. on Ch. 10) starring 12-year-old Drew Barrymore as Jody, the focus of a tug of war between her devoted grandparents, played by Robert Young and Elizabeth Wilson, and her deserted mother (Glynnis O'Connor)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Shopgirl, Claire Danes is Mirabelle Buttersfield, a displaced Vermonter, an artist, a twentysomething salesgirl at the gloves counter on the couture floor of Saks in Beverly Hills. She can stand idle for hours, interrupted by the occasional shopper looking for evening gloves to go with that Oscar de la Renta gown. And then one day Mirabelle is interrupted by a nice enough man of middle age, apparently out to buy a present for his wife or girlfriend. He's not sure if he should choose gray or black.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
We shouldn't have to tell you this, but here's a word of advice for guys who might be curious: Don't make love to a vacuum cleaner. It sucks! Alas, some lonesome fellow - from Long Branch, N.J., of all places - decided to date his Hoover. Of course, he was only in it for the sex. So it did what any upright appliance would do - it severed the relationship. And that's how a 51-year-old man became less of a man - and nearly bled to death in a bizarre mechanical love tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1992 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Interracial love is the sensitive subject of the film that leads this week's list of new home video. MISSISSIPPI MASALA 1/2 (1992) (Columbia TriStar) 118 minutes. Denzel Washington, Sarita Choudhury. An exuberant film by Salaam Bombay! director Mira Nair, this is an exotic and erotic love story about an interracial couple - a black American who has never seen Africa and an African-born Indian who has never seen her native land - whose cultures have more in common than they ever imagined.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By SARAKAY SMULLENS
THIS IS a valentine to Philadelphia and our Kimmel Center. Even cynics should forgive me, remembering the day. In truth, I can't help myself. I love the center because it is majestic. I love it because the lifeblood of so many marvelous Philadelphians is in it, enriching its soul and strengthening it. I love it because it's world-class. I love it because we did it - against great odds - when so many said we couldn't. Of course, no love is perfect, and this includes the Kimmel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If the course of true love never did run smooth, then what of the course of true loathe? A Fish in the Bathtub, a ruefully funny film starring Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara as Sam and Molly, squabblers closing in on their 40th anniversary, suggests loathing is a knotty form of love. Can this marriage be saved? Or must it first be detangled? The film's title refers to a large carp that irascible Sam brings home one night and parks in the tub. The fish is not a symbol. It is a symptom.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
About 20 years ago, filmmaker Stephen Frears and screenwriter Christopher Hampton adapted the novel Dangerous Liaisons . From Choderos de Laclos' defining document of 18th-century French literature, they spun a movie that brilliantly contrasted the cynics, who play love as a sport, against the romantics, visibly elevated by the union of two souls. Lightning does not strike again with Chéri . Frears and Hampton's version of Colette's heartrending novels - Chéri and The Return of Chéri - about a young man initiated by an older woman in the teens of the 20th century is surprisingly flat.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
MARION COTILLARD has been working as an actress since she was a teenager, but it was her Oscar-winning performance as Edith Piaf in "La Vie en Rose" that brought her to the attention of American audiences - and Hollywood filmmakers. Since then she's worked with directors such as Michael Mann ("Public Enemies"), Woody Allen ("Midnight in Paris"), Steven Soderbergh ("Contagion") and Christopher Nolan ("Inception," "The Dark Knight Rises"). In "Rust and Bone," she returns to France for an intimate relationship movie about a whale trainer and the fighter who sort of nurses her back to health after an accident at the Sea World-like water show where she works.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* SHARKNADO 2: THE SECOND ONE. 9 p.m. tomorrow, Syfy.   BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Directing the "Sharknado" movies is like fighting off airborne sharks: It helps to be able to think on one's feet. That's been the experience of Anthony C. Ferrante, whose rematch with the "Jaws" of weather systems, "Sharknado 2: The Second One," makes its Syfy debut tomorrow night with many more famous humans than the first. And at least as many sharks. (Keep your eyes peeled for the one from ABC's "Shark Tank.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
This is a love story. It's also a dance story, one that began in Dresden, Germany, in 1994. Its middle is happening here in Philadelphia, now. The lovers are award-winning artists, collaborators onstage and in real life - husband and wife Niki Cousineau and Jorge Cousineau, founders of the dance company Subcircle. Their new ensemble work All this happened, more or less , opens Thursday night at the Performance Garage. The story of their life and work together, its title is the opening line of Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse 5 . The novel's key event is the World War II firebombing of Dresden in which 130,000 people died - bombings Jorge's grandparents survived.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Attention, Phantom of the Opera lovers: Prepare to fall in love all over again. Cameron Mackintosh has redesigned Andrew Lloyd Webber's classic musical, which for the next month is receiving its North American premiere at the Academy of Music. Actually, remake more accurately describes what he has conceived here. Phantom , now almost 30 years old, needed to catch up with the times, particularly with advances in stagecraft. Accordingly, the sets (now by Paul Brown)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Valentine's Day and its extended V-Weekend will always be for lovers. Normally, that means reservations for romantic tete-a-tetes at a local restaurant, most of which are surely booked by now. It could, if you're really ambitious, be about booking an overnight stay at one of the area's hotels that offer the amenities of l'amour at varying price points such as string quartets in your suite, one-on-one boudoir photo shoots, aphrodisiac dining menus,...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  Into the sad, shut-in life of Adele Wheeler, the tremulous single mom played by Kate Winslet in Labor Day , comes a man. A strong, hushed, handsome man. He's handy around the house. He knows how to dance. He can cook chili and make breakfast. He teaches Adele's 13-year-old boy, Henry (Gattlin Griffith), how to play baseball. And he has an awesome recipe for peach pie. The fact that Frank Chambers (Josh Brolin) is also an escaped convict, imprisoned for killing someone, may complicate matters a bit. But hey, you take what you can get. Labor Day is a strange, strangely compelling romance - one minute it's Harlequin bodice-ripper, the next it's Jim Thompson pulp.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
What a difference two decades make. In 1993, Jonathan Harvey's Beautiful Thing seemed like a fairy tale of two gay teens finding love and acceptance in the violent, addiction-plagued public housing of London's working-class suburbs. Twenty-one years later, Mauckingbird's uneven production treats Beautiful Thing like an after-school special. In director Peter Reynolds' production, truant Jamie (Griffin Back), popular athlete Ste (Kevin Murray) and dropout Leah (Sofie Yavorsky)
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Chris Brennan
THERE'S A compelling scene in the documentary film "Caucus," released last month, when pollsters for the Des Moines Register lay out their conclusions to the newspaper's editors just before the 2012 Iowa caucus. Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum is neck and neck with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney after spending the first two-thirds of the film coming off as an also-ran candidate, losing the attention game to a field of sizzle-then-fizzle competitors such as U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann , former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich , Texas Gov. Rick Perry and radio host Herman Cain . The newspaper's top editor, stunned, asks, "Jesus, could he win this Tuesday night?"
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
WHEN TEEN and tween girls are looking for a role model, there's no reason to gravitate to over-the-top booty-shaking, half-naked pop stars. Maybe they should try Saoirse Ronan. Yes, her name is hard to spell (it's pronounced sear-sha), but the Oscar-nominated 19-year-old Irish star has quite an impressive body of work ("Atonement," "The Lovely Bones," "Hanna") to go with her winning, wisecracking personality and a great accent. Ronan can presently be seen as Daisy in "How I Live Now" and the Daily News caught up with her in September when the film played the Toronto International Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
"This is a true story. It's a love story - our love story. " That story is Blink by Phil Porter, being given its U.S. premiere by Inis Nua Theatre Company. And that's the trouble: It's a short story, "true" or not, not a play. Its two characters speak almost entirely to us. They sit, inexplicably, at desks, inexplicably shoeless, and narrate the chapters of their odd romance. Despite director Tom Reing's attempts to give the actors stuff to do, much of which seems awkward, Blink lacks theatricalization.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas Sparks is a poet of the bourgeois heart. A master technician who crashed onto the scene with 1996's mega-seller The Notebook , he carefully calibrates his love stories to appeal to middle-class women and men yearning for the ultimate consumerist fantasy - true love. A love so pure, it transcends crass materialism and transfigures our otherwise humdrum existence. Powerful opium, indeed. And we're hooked. The North Carolina author's first 16 novels have sold 90 million copies worldwide in more than 50 languages.
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