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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It takes almost a full act for Kiss of the Spider Woman to get around to re-creating a scene from a movie. Enacted against a photographic projection of a lush tropical garden, the movie turns out to be a musical of the Carmen Miranda stripe, with Chita Rivera breaking free of a huge birdcage to shake a tailful of yellow plumes at a clutch of bare-chested island boys. It's a tolerable bit of nonsense, and it materializes just in time to rescue Kiss of the Spider Woman from a seemingly terminal case of the droops.
NEWS
February 14, 2010 | By Sally Friedman
My husband and I are standing at the kitchen sink while he scrapes the dishes, and I rinse them in warm sudsy water. The division of labor is etched in stone - immutable - because over the years of a very long marriage, we both know that he scrapes better than I do. If it's a weekday night, Jeopardy! is playing on the kitchen TV and my husband, a master player, gets four right in a row. We "high-five" each other, and celebrate with chocolate Popsicles. Low-fat, alas. It's been a long journey from giddy young bride and groom setting off for a Bermuda honeymoon to the kitchen sink in our empty-nester digs.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
The Sundance Film Festival's awards, announced on Saturday, were dominated by Nate Parker's The Birth of a Nation , the story of Nat Turner's slave rebellion that won both the Grand Jury Prize and the audience award. But another, less bloody take on the African American experience made waves in Park City as well: Southside With You , which follows a Chicago lawyer and her summer associate who just happen to be the future Barack and Michelle Obama on the course of their first date.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Nothing wrong with the syrupy romance Here on Earth that a megadose of insulin couldn't fix. Throw in a year's supply of bran muffins, too, to counteract the schmaltz. A teenage romance in the vein of Love Story, Here on Earth stars Leelee Sobieski as a wisecracking townie who catches the eye of Chris Klein, a smug preppie at a nearby private school. This unmans Josh Hartnett, her stalwart townie beau. No sooner do Samantha (Sobieski) and Kelley (Klein) lock eyes than Jasper (Hartnett)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Planet Earth is a dump. Literally. In the 28th century, the human race has fled to space, and apart from a few cockroaches, there are no life forms to speak of, just empty metropolises, abandoned ultra-malls and mountains of debris festering in the toxic haze of a long-ago environmental meltdown. What's a lonely robot to do? Well, in WALLE, the little rusted box with the binocular face and tank treads for feet falls in love, that's what. An adventurous shift away from the anthropomorphic madcappery of Pixar's recent animated features, WALLE, directed by Finding Nemo and Ratatouille veteran Andrew Stanton, is part love story, part eco-cautionary tale, and, for its first half, pretty much devoid of human dialogue.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Years ago, when "Shadowlands" star Anthony Hopkins was still making ventriloquist horror movies, I doubt anyone thought he'd become one of the most honored and revered stars of his day. Anthony Hopkins owns the '90s. The Oscar man. He won for "The Silence of the Lambs," was nominated again for "Howards End," and will likely be nominated for his roles this year in "Remains of the Day" and "Shadowlands. " Either one would do, since he plays more or less the same character - an uptight British guy who doesn't get any action until well into middle age. Based on the life of British author/educator C.S. Lewis, it casts Hopkins as the brilliant but repressed Lewis, a man who has gray hair and tenure at Oxford before he discovers the joys of romantic and sexual love.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
'I always wanted to be in the movies," says Aileen Wuornos, the hard-bitten, homeless soul who turns tricks on Florida roadways, and who, in real life, was convicted of and executed for the murders of men who paid to have sex with her. Well, Wuornos has her movie: In Monster, director Patty Jenkins' "based on a true story" drama, the hooker-turned-killer is portrayed with jumpy and fierce conviction by a virtually unidentifiable Charlize Theron....
NEWS
February 8, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
As love stories go, this isn't exactly "Romeo and Juliet" or "Casablanca. " Not even Rocky and, yo, Adrian. But, then, this is the 1990s so we must make do. Mike, 33, has an MBA and is a certified public accountant. He has a cool city condo, drives a '57 Thunderbird, plays golf at a suburban club and travels the country on business. And as he frankly says about himself, "I'm a good-looking, strapping, 6-4 young guy. " Despite these many qualities, he had a problem with the opposite sex. "Three years ago, I had a job that kept me zipping around the country so much I didn't really have time to meet women.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Months after her husband was killed by the Nazis, an emotionally torn Kate Schmid fell in love. Hermann Hoerlin was a tall, rugged mountain climber who helped her through a crisis. But Schmid was Jewish. The man she loved was not. Yet against the backdrop of Nazi Germany, they found a way to marry when their union was forbidden by law. For years, only the bare bones of their story were known to their daughter, Bettina Hoerlin of Chestnut Hill. Then, about eight years ago, she opened a suitcase that had belonged to her parents, long dead.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | By SALLY STEENLAND
What can you say about a 52-year-old photographer who spends a week with a farmer's wife, falls deeply in love and never sees her again? That his tale will hit the best sellers list for 42 weeks straight. That critics will shake their heads at the popularity of a book they trashed. And that readers will ignore reviews to devour a clumsily told story packed with sure-fire fantasies. The book is a little novel called The Bridges of Madison County. Over the past nine months, it has sold 1.5 million copies.
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