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NEWS
November 26, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a turbulent 26 years in foster care, hospitals, institutions, and, finally, Philadelphia prisons, Jhontue Ryals wanted only to live with family. On Nov. 17, she got her wish. She was sentenced to five years' probation and released to live with an aunt, Rhodina Brown, in Elkins Park. This was to be her first Thanksgiving with family. But like so much else in Jhontue's life, it didn't work out that way. Released from prison, Jhontue - everyone calls her by her first name - got home at 2:30 a.m. Twelve hours later, she was in Albert Einstein Medical Center with a fever of 102, pneumonia, and low blood pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012
DO IT RIGHT This is a variation of the marichyasana ("ray of light") yoga pose, which massages the abdominal organs, stretches the shoulders and strengthens the spine. (Not recommended for those with spinal injuries, or high or low blood pressure.) Sit on the floor or yoga mat with your legs extended in front of you. Bend your knees (Indian-style) with both shins inward and left leg in front. Keeping your left leg bent, reposition the leg so that the left foot is flat on the floor.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | by Molly Ivins, Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Much ado about very little seems to be the recent pattern in our patch of what Mencken used to call "this lugubrious ball. " Note the flutters of excitement following Bill Clinton's first post- election press conference: The media were thrilled, the media were awed, the New York Times devoted an entire editorial to the fact that Clinton Speaks English Beautifully. It is, of course, his native language. That he speaks without cue cards in complete sentences, can express ideas with nuance and complexity and is audibly able to think on his feet would be regarded with wonder only in a nation whose last two presidents have been Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Walking is not ordinarily a crime, but when 81-year-old William H. Patten of West Norriton Township takes his early morning stroll from now on, he will have to keep both feet on the sidewalk or be fined. District Justice Elaine Adams yesterday dismissed a charge that Patten violated the Pennsylvania motor-vehicle code by refusing to walk on a sidewalk. She did so, though, only after the retired gas-station owner promised to give up his passion for street walking whenever possible.
NEWS
October 5, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this report
A King of Prussia blood-products company yesterday announced its third product recall in a week, this time for a hemophilia medicine. The company, Centeon, said it was recalling 1,600 vials from one lot of Monoclate-P because some of the bottles may have been cracked during manufacturing, possibly after being dropped. The vials were distributed to 28 health-care providers in May, according to the company. The lot being recalled is P72304, expiring April 12, 1998. Officials from Centeon and the Food and Drug Administration said the recall was a precaution and that no ill effects had been reported by patients.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ViroPharma Inc. said Thursday its profit fell 26 percent in the third quarter on costs related to drug development and licensing agreements, and the costs of marketing its drug Cinryze. ViroPharma said its profit declined to $28.2 million, or 35 cents per share, from $38.3 million, or 45 cents per share, one year ago. Revenue increased 21 percent, to $143 million from $117.8 million. Analysts expected the company to report a profit 33 cents per share and $130.7 million in revenue, according to FactSet.
SPORTS
October 23, 2010 | By Mario Aguirre, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doug Collins returned to 76ers practice Friday after missing the final two games of the preseason so he could get medical treatment. Collins, 59, had tests and was treated for what neurologists determined was vertigo stemming from a concussion he suffered on Memorial Day. The Sixers coach said he was in a coffee shop in Phoenix when he fainted, hitting a table and a chair as he fell. Collins said he cracked his head on the concrete and shattered three ribs. He was in Cincinnati on Tuesday for the team's exhibition game against the Cleveland Cavaliers, but he left before it started when he experienced symptoms from the head injury.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
The music built like a long, slow massage, pulsing, and the multitude inside the Civic Center relaxed, swaying in the warmth of their companionship against the gray, dreary day outside. Hundreds of pairs of hands fluttered in rhythmic clapping, then reached for the heavens as evangelist Eileen George led a prayer. "My fatha', my daddy, look who's coming to you, holding the hands of the angels. It's us," sighed George, in the broad accents of her home in Massachusetts. "Praise God, give glory to God. " George, a mother of eight, recounted her quest to know God for several hundred charismatic Catholics gathered yesterday for a healing service as part of their sixth annual weekend rally at the Civic Center.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Kelly Bliss eats a balanced diet and works out four times a week, lifting weights, doing aerobics and performing some yoga-like stretches. Since she doesn't drive, Bliss walks almost everywhere she goes - sometimes up to 20 miles a week. And she teaches fitness classes in Lansdowne, plus counsels women on how to eat healthy. You'd think someone like her would have a body like Cindy Crawford's, right? But Bliss looks more like Roseanne than a supermodel. At 5 feet tall, she weighs a solid 200 pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1995 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post and USA Today
The name of Boston's most beloved baseball player was emblazoned on the city's newest traffic tunnel yesterday. Ted Williams joined Gov. William F. Weld at the opening of the tunnel that goes under Boston Harbor, connecting South Boston to Logan International Airport. "This is here, and you'll be talking about it for 100 years," said Williams, 77, who wore a blue knit cap against the freezing cold. The $2.3 billion project, 30 years in the making, has been a cause of controversy in Beantown, but no one is complaining about its being named after the former sports star and war hero.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012
DO IT RIGHT This is a variation of the marichyasana ("ray of light") yoga pose, which massages the abdominal organs, stretches the shoulders and strengthens the spine. (Not recommended for those with spinal injuries, or high or low blood pressure.) Sit on the floor or yoga mat with your legs extended in front of you. Bend your knees (Indian-style) with both shins inward and left leg in front. Keeping your left leg bent, reposition the leg so that the left foot is flat on the floor.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ViroPharma Inc. said Thursday its profit fell 26 percent in the third quarter on costs related to drug development and licensing agreements, and the costs of marketing its drug Cinryze. ViroPharma said its profit declined to $28.2 million, or 35 cents per share, from $38.3 million, or 45 cents per share, one year ago. Revenue increased 21 percent, to $143 million from $117.8 million. Analysts expected the company to report a profit 33 cents per share and $130.7 million in revenue, according to FactSet.
NEWS
November 26, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a turbulent 26 years in foster care, hospitals, institutions, and, finally, Philadelphia prisons, Jhontue Ryals wanted only to live with family. On Nov. 17, she got her wish. She was sentenced to five years' probation and released to live with an aunt, Rhodina Brown, in Elkins Park. This was to be her first Thanksgiving with family. But like so much else in Jhontue's life, it didn't work out that way. Released from prison, Jhontue - everyone calls her by her first name - got home at 2:30 a.m. Twelve hours later, she was in Albert Einstein Medical Center with a fever of 102, pneumonia, and low blood pressure.
SPORTS
October 23, 2010 | By Mario Aguirre, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doug Collins returned to 76ers practice Friday after missing the final two games of the preseason so he could get medical treatment. Collins, 59, had tests and was treated for what neurologists determined was vertigo stemming from a concussion he suffered on Memorial Day. The Sixers coach said he was in a coffee shop in Phoenix when he fainted, hitting a table and a chair as he fell. Collins said he cracked his head on the concrete and shattered three ribs. He was in Cincinnati on Tuesday for the team's exhibition game against the Cleveland Cavaliers, but he left before it started when he experienced symptoms from the head injury.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Kelly Bliss eats a balanced diet and works out four times a week, lifting weights, doing aerobics and performing some yoga-like stretches. Since she doesn't drive, Bliss walks almost everywhere she goes - sometimes up to 20 miles a week. And she teaches fitness classes in Lansdowne, plus counsels women on how to eat healthy. You'd think someone like her would have a body like Cindy Crawford's, right? But Bliss looks more like Roseanne than a supermodel. At 5 feet tall, she weighs a solid 200 pounds.
NEWS
October 5, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this report
A King of Prussia blood-products company yesterday announced its third product recall in a week, this time for a hemophilia medicine. The company, Centeon, said it was recalling 1,600 vials from one lot of Monoclate-P because some of the bottles may have been cracked during manufacturing, possibly after being dropped. The vials were distributed to 28 health-care providers in May, according to the company. The lot being recalled is P72304, expiring April 12, 1998. Officials from Centeon and the Food and Drug Administration said the recall was a precaution and that no ill effects had been reported by patients.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1995 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post and USA Today
The name of Boston's most beloved baseball player was emblazoned on the city's newest traffic tunnel yesterday. Ted Williams joined Gov. William F. Weld at the opening of the tunnel that goes under Boston Harbor, connecting South Boston to Logan International Airport. "This is here, and you'll be talking about it for 100 years," said Williams, 77, who wore a blue knit cap against the freezing cold. The $2.3 billion project, 30 years in the making, has been a cause of controversy in Beantown, but no one is complaining about its being named after the former sports star and war hero.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | by Molly Ivins, Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Much ado about very little seems to be the recent pattern in our patch of what Mencken used to call "this lugubrious ball. " Note the flutters of excitement following Bill Clinton's first post- election press conference: The media were thrilled, the media were awed, the New York Times devoted an entire editorial to the fact that Clinton Speaks English Beautifully. It is, of course, his native language. That he speaks without cue cards in complete sentences, can express ideas with nuance and complexity and is audibly able to think on his feet would be regarded with wonder only in a nation whose last two presidents have been Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
Walking is not ordinarily a crime, but when 81-year-old William H. Patten of West Norriton Township takes his early morning stroll from now on, he will have to keep both feet on the sidewalk or be fined. District Justice Elaine Adams yesterday dismissed a charge that Patten violated the Pennsylvania motor-vehicle code by refusing to walk on a sidewalk. She did so, though, only after the retired gas-station owner promised to give up his passion for street walking whenever possible.
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