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BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Commodore Barry Bridge is about to get a $100 million makeover. A Delaware River Port Authority board committee on Wednesday approved the first of three phases of sandblasting and painting that will continue for five years, starting in January and continuing through 2019. The $22 million contracts approved Wednesday still need to be approved by the full DRPA board next week. The bridge links Chester and Logan Township. It is the third-busiest of four DRPA toll bridges between South Jersey and Pennsylvania, carrying 6.5 million vehicles a year.
NEWS
March 29, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Robin Hood Dell East is unsafe for concerts this summer, and a dilapidated camp for the city's poorest children should be shut down for good, administration officials told City Council yesterday. In a briefing, a city-hired engineer said cracked, uneven and sagging concrete at the Dell East puts concert-goers at risk of injury, and recommended closing the amphitheater for the 2008 season. At the same meeting, the recreation department said Camp William Penn, the 677-acre facility in the Poconos, should be closed because "the kids that go there don't want to go back" to it. Clay Armbrister, Mayor Nutter's chief of staff, recommended a complete overhaul of the concrete, draining, wiring and seating for the Dell East, at Ridge Avenue and 33d Street, for at least the 2008 season.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You might have invested in your retirement via 401(k) accounts, one of the primary vehicles by which we shoot for financial security after we stop working. We trust our employers to provide these plans at a low cost. Mark Mensack, a new cop on the 401(k) retirement beat, says we and our corporate plan sponsors might be getting ripped off. And he wants to help: Mensack's expertise is in the area of 401(k) hidden fees and ethical issues in the retirement-plan marketplace. He has 14 years of experience as a financial adviser with broker-dealers, and three as a registered investment adviser.
NEWS
August 13, 1986 | By Connie Barry, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill Township Council has tabled plans to set up a nonprofit organization that would provide low-cost housing. Only four of the seven council members attended the last meeting, held Thursday, and Councilwoman Mary Anne D. Tamm asked that a decision be postponed until the council's next meeting scheduled for Aug. 25. Community development director Marc Shuster said that the plan calls for a five-member board of trustees that would...
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Rosalee Rhodes FOR THE INQUIRER
The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill of New Jersey has selected Burlington County as its site for a pilot project, the Extended Family Support Program, which will offer free help for the loved ones of people affected by mental illness. The program is designed to implement new support programs for all families and loved ones of people affected by mental illness; to help under-served, culturally diverse groups such as African Americans and Latinos; to reach siblings and other extended family members through community groups such as hospitals, treatment facilities and social service agencies; and to increase public awareness of support programs already in place.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1987 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sun Co. officials said yesterday they expect it will continue to be difficult to make a profit on selling and refining oil for the rest of the year. In a meeting with reporters, the Sun executives attributed the anticipated squeeze to the low cost of gasoline and other refined products relative to the cost of crude oil. "Times are going to be tough," said Joseph D. Mazzei, manager of Sun's refinery at Marcus Hook. Gasoline prices have stayed relatively low because supplies are high, Sun officials indicated.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
Armed with a shovel and broom, the two women attacked the cluttered attic in Mount Holly yesterday as though they were cutting a path through the thick of a tropical jungle. First Phyllis Harter and Margaret Barnes hacked their way through a foot- deep layer of rubbish - wrinkled clothes, decades-old National Geographic magazines, a pile of old mail with postmarks from the 1970s - and lugged the assorted debris down three flights of stairs. Then the two Habitat for Humanity volunteers went at the floor itself, ripping up rugs and mismatched linoleum until they reached hardwood.
SPORTS
April 9, 2011
Fall from grace, Part I Scott Kazmir was the jewel of the New York Mets organization when he was traded to Tampa Bay, for Victor Zambrano , right before the trade deadline in 2004. He put up a 3.51 ERA pitching in the ferocious AL East the next four seasons and made two all-star teams. Since then, he's been traded to the Los Angeles Angels and his ERA is 5.54. Now there's a chance he'll be dropped from the Angels rotation. Kazmir will start on Saturday against Toronto, but he needs to improve on his dreadful start on Sunday: 12/3 innings, five hits, two walks, two hit batters, and five earned runs.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many in the health-care industry, 1992 will be recalled as a year of bloodletting and turmoil. Uncertainty over pending health reforms left numerous firms in a financial funk. Increased competition and restructuring added to bottom-line pressures. Then there was U.S. Healthcare, the Blue Bell operator of health- maintenance organizations. It rolled through 1992 like a steamroller, recording record revenues, profits and earnings per share. Enrollment in the company's prepaid health plans swelled to more than 1.4 million subscribers - a 13 percent gain.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | BY ANN LAND
In recent months, the question of supermarket item pricing has taken center stage in City Council, and as a result, the real issues in the matter have been obscured in favor of the more emotional ones. The main argument advanced by those in favor of making item pricing the law hinges on the contention that supermarket shoppers are inconvenienced by not having each item individually marked. As a result, they say, consumers sometimes have trouble finding the prices of particular items, and thus stand to lose millions of dollars each year.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 28, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
The American Bar Association has backed off a plan to offer lower-cost legal services to small businesses and individuals after pushback from bar leaders in Pennsylvania and Illinois. The ABA launched the pilot project last October with Rocket Lawyer, a Web-based lawyer referral service, in Pennsylvania, Illinois, and California. The goal was to make legal services available to individuals and small businesses who typically cannot afford them and do not qualify for legal aid. Bar leaders in Pennsylvania and Illinois bitterly opposed the program, however.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Leave it to a Canadian to put a positive spin on SNAP (a.k.a. food stamps), a program whose ungainly full name is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program . "We don't have food stamps in Canada. A lot of Americans don't appreciate that the program is actually really cool and effective," says Leanne Brown , author of Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4 a Day (Workman). She'll discuss the book and sign copies Tuesday, Oct. 27 at the Free Library of Philadelphia . The book has become an unlikely phenomenon, and the interest in it started before it was officially published in July.
NEWS
February 12, 2015
P RAMOD ABICHANDANI, 30, of Fairmount, is a Drexel University professor and founder of LocoRobo, a low-cost, ed-tech robot. The nonprofit is operating out of DreamIt Ventures' accelerator in University City. Abichandani hopes the robot gets students excited about STEM - science, technology, engineering and math. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for LocoRobo? A: When I was working on my Ph.D., I realized there was not much on the market to enable college and K-12 students to get a robot and use it because there was a barrier, which was the programming part.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Middle-class parents of children with disabilities: There's a new low-cost, tax-advantaged way to save money on their behalf. Low cost is the key idea here. ABLE accounts serve a purpose similar to the special-needs trusts often set up to help disabled or special-needs children without disqualifying them from government benefits. ABLE accounts don't replace special-needs trusts. They are another option. In December, President Obama signed the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE)
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Commodore Barry Bridge is about to get a $100 million makeover. A Delaware River Port Authority board committee on Wednesday approved the first of three phases of sandblasting and painting that will continue for five years, starting in January and continuing through 2019. The $22 million contracts approved Wednesday still need to be approved by the full DRPA board next week. The bridge links Chester and Logan Township. It is the third-busiest of four DRPA toll bridges between South Jersey and Pennsylvania, carrying 6.5 million vehicles a year.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Since all-wheel-drive crossover SUVs have become so popular in snow-prone places such as Philadelphia, I thought an AWD crossover variation on the Annual Inquirer Cheap Car Survey might be of service. As it turns out, you don't have to spend half of the gross national product of Uganda to get home in a snowstorm. I found five perfectly serviceable AWD crossovers for less than $22,500. Indeed, three of them are less than $21,500. These entry-level compact crossovers are base models with decent standard equipment litanies and reasonable room for folks and cargo.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
]When her husband died in December, Lauren Davis knew it was time to move. The rent on her rather tired Grays Ferry home was going up, and her landlord was not terribly responsive. The 63-year-old retired teacher's aide feared, however, that she did not have the means to relocate within her beloved neighborhood. "I didn't know what I was going to do," Davis said. The answer was phase two of the Anthony Wayne Senior Housing complex at South 28th and Morris Streets, which was developed by the Altman Group with the backing of City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson.
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ben and Sharneka Hunter are a fast-food family. The Wilmington husband and wife work at Burger Kings in different cities - Ben, 43, in Wilmington, Sharneka, 30, in New Castle. Both earn hourly minimum-wage salaries of $7.25. And both need food stamps and Medicaid to augment their combined $17,000 yearly salary - $2,500 under the federal poverty line - so that they and their 9-year-old daughter can survive. "I don't think it's fair to be underpaid," Ben said. The Hunters' plight is shared nationwide, according to a report released last week by the University of California Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frontier Airlines, which is being sold to a Phoenix private-equity firm that wants to bring more low airfares to U.S. travelers, announced Wednesday that it would add nonstop flights from Trenton Mercer Airport to Cincinnati and Charlotte, N.C., in February. That brings to 11 the nonstop destinations that Frontier will fly from Trenton, joining Atlanta; Chicago-Midway; Columbus, Ohio; Detroit; Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Orlando, and Tampa, Fla.; and Raleigh-Durham, N.C. Frontier will fly to Charlotte four times a week and to Cincinnati three times a week, starting Feb. 12. Tickets booked by midnight Oct. 20 will be offered at introductory fares as low as $39 one way for travel from Feb. 12 through May 20, the airline said.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2013 | By Scott Mayerowitz, Associated Press
Other U.S. airlines have struggled over the last decade with the ups and downs of the economy and the price of jet fuel, but Allegiant Air has been profitable for 10 straight years. The tiny airline focuses on a niche others ignore: It flies only from small cities, including Allentown, Harrisburg, and Scranton in Pennsylvania, to sunny vacation spots. Allegiant entices people with low fares and nonstop flights. Then it aggressively pitches them hotels, rental cars, show tickets, and other entertainment, earning millions in commissions.
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