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Low Fat Diet

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NEWS
June 13, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A low-fat vegetarian diet can dramatically improve the health of diabetics, and some patients can even be taken off medications, preliminary results from a new study indicate. "Just as a poor lifestyle followed over years can lead to the development of diabetes, an improvement in that lifestyle is precisely what can lead to dramatic improvement, and perhaps even cure," said Andrew Nicholson, who devised the study. The study challenges current techniques for managing diabetes, which usually aim for a diet in which 25 percent to 30 percent of calories come from fat. The vegetarian diet's fat level is about 10 percent.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Heart disease begins in childhood, a federal advisory panel said yesterday, and to prevent it parents should put all children 2 years of age and older on a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet. The recommended diet - rich in fruits and vegetables and easy on the burgers and potato chips - is identical to the one outlined last year for the general population, but underscores the urgency of beginning good eating habits early. The panel stressed that its dietary restrictions do not apply to infants.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A study of thousands of women over 50 who stuck to a healthy, low-fat diet for more than eight years showed no significant effect on their risks of breast cancer, colon cancer, stroke or heart disease. Researchers who led the federally funded diet study - the largest ever - are trying to put the best face on the results, stressing that breast-cancer numbers hinted at reduced risk, although that could have been just by chance. "This study shows that just reducing total fat intake does not go far enough to have an impact on heart-disease risk," said Jacques Rossouw, the physician who directed the federal study.
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article includes information from the Associated Press
Eating less fat may sound like a sensible thing to do, but for the majority of people it probably won't lower their heart-disease risk at all. In fact, the trend toward consuming less fat in the diet may be harmful for some people, according to research presented yesterday. Ronald Krauss, a researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at the University of California, said the recommendation that Americans should eat less fat and consume more carbohydrates as a way to lower blood cholesterol and reduce heart-disease risk may be over-simplified.
NEWS
November 2, 1993 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An independent panel has questioned the scientific merits of the Women's Health Initiative, the largest research study ever funded by the National Institutes of Health. In a report released yesterday, the Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academy of Sciences, suggested scaling back and refocusing the $625 million government project, which is set to span 14 years and involve more than 160,000 women. The NIH project is designed to examine whether a low-fat diet reduces the risk of breast and bowel cancers, whether hormone treatments reduce the risk of heart disease, and whether calcium and vitamin supplements can reduce the risk of osteoporosis.
FOOD
August 23, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Could you please explain the difference between whole milk, milk with 2 percent fat and milk with 1 percent fat? Also, my store carries turkey products such as sausages labeled "93 percent fat free" and "97 percent fat free. " Are these OK to eat if you're on a low-fat diet? - Elaine Dear Elaine: When products are labeled "97 percent fat free" or "2 percent fat," they are indicating how much fat the product contains in relation to its weight. For example, a turkey sausage that is 93 percent fat free contains 7 percent fat by weight.
FOOD
June 21, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I love sweet potatoes, but I'm on a low-fat diet. Are they OK for me? - N.R. Dear N.R.: Sweet potatoes are fairly high in calories, but they are very low in fat, so they should be allowed in your low-fat diet. You must avoid dressing them with butter, cream and other high-fat additions, however. But baked sweet potatoes and yams are generally so sweet and delicious by themselves that adding fats, sugar, honey, syrup or other high-calorie adornments should be unnecessary.
NEWS
January 26, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Q. Why the uproar over the FDA supplement rule? A. The rule says only drugs can claim to prevent or treat disease and that foods and supplements can claim to be part of a lifestyle that might reduce risk. Supplements can make only FDA-approved claims. Q. Why is the FDA pushing this rule? A. FDA officials say a rule limiting claims will make it easier to file complaints against those making false claims; opponents say the FDA is trying to protect drug companies from losing money.
NEWS
January 28, 2006
If only there were a miracle drug . . . A tiny pill that could melt pounds the way other medicines have stabilized blood pressure and lowered cholesterol. That could quickly trim bulging midsections now plaguing two-thirds of American adults and encumbering the health-care system. A pill that could be the breakthrough overweight Americans seek when they try $1 billion worth of wacky weight-loss remedies a year. It's not that easy. Weight loss just doesn't come in a bottle.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | by Ziva Branstetter, Daily News Staff Writer
It all started with a phone call. Jennifer Turner, 17, was sitting at home in Elkins Park early last month watching a show called "Getting Healthy" on the Television Food Network. The call-in show's topic was diet pills and Jennifer had a question. The Cheltenham High senior asked about a quick-weight-loss program that promises "you can lose 20 pounds in two weeks" with diet pills. She told them she wanted to lose about 15 pounds by prom night, June 7. They told her to try a low-fat diet instead.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Pour on the olive oil, preferably over fish and vegetables: One of the longest and most scientific tests of a Mediterranean diet suggests that this style of eating, even loosely defined, can substantially reduce the chance of heart-related problems, especially strokes, in older people at high risk. The study lasted five years and involved nearly 7,500 people in Spain. Those who ate Mediterranean-style with lots of olive oil or nuts had a 30 percent lower risk of major cardiovascular problems compared with those who were told to follow a low-fat diet but who did not, in reality, cut out much fat. Mediterranean meant lots of fruit, fish, chicken, beans, tomato sauce, salads, and wine - and little soda, baked goods, and red meats.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2007 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How badly do you want to be skinny? Is it worth soiling your underwear? Those questions will likely confront users of the new Alli, the first over-the-counter diet drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Alli (pronounced al-EYE) went on sale for the first time about a week ago - a stronger prescription form, Xenical, has been available since 1999 - and its promotional material alone makes for strong medicine: The drug, which helps people lose small amounts of weight, can cause oily discharges, uncontrolled bowel movements, and gas if you eat too much fat. Its marketing effort makes an impression by telling users to wear dark pants and carry extra clothes in case they soil themselves.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
THE STUDIES indicating that a low-fat diet has negligible effect on the risk of chronic diseases validate what health authorities have been saying for a decade: It's not just fat - it's the saturated fat in meat, eggs and dairy products. The studies found that women who cut down on saturated fat had a lower risk of heart disease, stroke and colon cancer. A wealth of other studies over three decades confirm that consumption of saturated fats raises substantially the risk of contracting these diseases.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A study of thousands of women over 50 who stuck to a healthy, low-fat diet for more than eight years showed no significant effect on their risks of breast cancer, colon cancer, stroke or heart disease. Researchers who led the federally funded diet study - the largest ever - are trying to put the best face on the results, stressing that breast-cancer numbers hinted at reduced risk, although that could have been just by chance. "This study shows that just reducing total fat intake does not go far enough to have an impact on heart-disease risk," said Jacques Rossouw, the physician who directed the federal study.
NEWS
January 28, 2006
If only there were a miracle drug . . . A tiny pill that could melt pounds the way other medicines have stabilized blood pressure and lowered cholesterol. That could quickly trim bulging midsections now plaguing two-thirds of American adults and encumbering the health-care system. A pill that could be the breakthrough overweight Americans seek when they try $1 billion worth of wacky weight-loss remedies a year. It's not that easy. Weight loss just doesn't come in a bottle.
FOOD
January 12, 2006 | By Beverly Levitt FOR THE INQUIRER
Nine years ago, Will Clower was just another bulge-battler, yo-yoing 20 pounds up and down, this way or that. Even though he tried to follow a low-fat diet - with skim milk, skinless chicken, no-fat yogurt, diet sodas and margarine, he says - "I was in constant mortal battle with those pounds, and losing the war of weight creep. " Then Clower, who is a neurophysiologist, and his wife, Dottie, also a neuroscientist, spent two years in Lyon, France, doing research at the Institute of Cognitive Sciences.
FOOD
May 22, 2003 | By George Ingram FOR THE INQUIRER
In a nation obsessed with losing weight, many Americans believe that the high-protein, low-carbohydrate Atkins diet is the next best thing to an instant diet pill. Just about everybody knows someone who is piling on the bacon, eggs and T-bone steaks and shedding pounds in the process. The late Robert Atkins, a New York City cardiologist, launched his jihad in 1972 with the publication of Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution. But his plan has won new respectability. Results of the first controlled trial of the diet, led by University of Pennsylvania researchers, were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Much information that gets passed around on what constitutes a healthy diet and fitness regimen is wrong, says Dr. Thomas Wadden of the Weight and Eating Disorders Program at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Here are his comments on some of the most common myths. Myth: If you eat a low-fat diet, you will lose weight without counting calories. Wadden: "The number of calories you consume determines whether or not you gain or lose weight. If you ate only sticks of butter - but consumed just 1,000 calories a day - you would lose weight.
NEWS
July 2, 1998
If Board of City Trusts officials were to take their lead from the panel they handpicked to assess their stewardship of the trusts and its famous ward, Girard College, the trustees would: Spend millions more on schooling the Girard students, drawn from poor and fatherless homes. Get out of the coal-mining business, stop dabbling in real estate, and halt the practice of running up debt to make such relatively high-risk investments. Make room for new blood on the board, which oversees not only the 19th-century bequest for Girard College but also 110 smaller trusts.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Did you check out all those firm, athletic bodies on "Push," the new one-hour drama series that premiered Monday on ABC? Most of the actors, who portray members of a prestigious college athletic program, didn't start out that way. The show's personal trainer, Garrett Warren, says that when he first got hold of the show's eight cast members in December, he had his work cut out for him. Although a couple of the actors already were buff, Warren...
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