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Lower Merion School District

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NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a year when the Alabama governor blocked schoolhouse doors in support of segregation and a March on Washington aimed to crush it, Lower Merion had its own 1963 moment. The Main Line branch of the NAACP protested that students in the Lower Merion School District's predominantly black Ardmore Avenue Elementary School were receiving an inferior education. The NAACP wanted the school closed. Wendell Holland, 61, understands why the disparity was wrong. But as a student there, the solution wasn't easy to accept.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of Lower Merion's unforgettable families has a message: Forget about us. "We're done," Michael Robbins said Wednesday. Robbins spoke minutes after his daughter Paige, 20, dropped her invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District, the same district that last year paid his son Blake $175,000 to resolve allegations that it had spied on him through a school-issued laptop. But like Blake Robbins' case, which drew an international spotlight to the district and stirred finger-pointing and contempt from parents and officials inside it, this one didn't end without a dose of theater.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes, the tiniest thing can go viral. Like a cookie. A Lower Merion mom learned that this week, after her Twitter rant over a school permission slip became part of an online debate about schools, food, and parenting. "Insanity. I have to sign a permission slip so my middle schooler can eat an Oreo," wrote the woman, who identifies herself online only as Main Line Housewife. The message was soon posted on various websites and parenting blogs. So was a photo of the permission slip, sent home to explain a hands-on science activity that involved Double Stuf Oreos.
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | By Tim Panaccio, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth school children should have a safer walk to Merion Elementary School beginning this fall, a Narberth parent says. Estelle Munson Elesh said her yearlong battle to improve safety conditions along Rockland and South Narberth Avenues appeared to have paid off. Elesh and other parents had petitioned both Narberth Borough and the Lower Merion School District in an unsuccessful effort to have a crossing guard assigned at the intersection of...
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eight months after the Lower Merion School District thought it had settled the furor over secret monitoring of students' laptops, the district faces a new legal battle on the issue. On Monday, a 2009 graduate of Harriton High School sued the school district, claiming it violated his civil rights by capturing nearly 8,000 webcam photos and screen-shots from his laptop between September 2008 and March 2009. The plaintiff, Joshua Levin, claims he was "shocked, humiliated and severely emotionally distressed" after viewing the images last summer.
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Lower Merion student who alleged that Harriton High School officials used a webcam to spy on him, then made the charges stick in court, has been cited for vehicle-code violations in Lower Merion. Blake J. Robbins, 17, of the 400 block of Hidden River Road, Penn Valley, was cited Nov. 26 by Lower Merion police officer Stephen M. Salera for driving an unregistered vehicle and displaying a license plate on the wrong vehicle. Robbins and his parents, Michael and Holly, could not be reached for comment Thursday.
NEWS
December 28, 2011 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lower Merion School District has resolved another lawsuit with a former student over its secret monitoring of student laptops. The district reached a settlement last week with Joshua Levin, a 2009 graduate of Harriton High School. In a lawsuit filed in June in federal court, Levin contended the suburban school district violated his civil rights by capturing nearly 8,000 webcam photos and screen shots from his school-issued laptop between September 2008 and March 2009. Levin's lawyer said Wednesday the settlement proposal was higher than the $10,000 payments offered to other affected students but he would not discuss details.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Add Montgomery to the list of suburban Philadelphia counties that are coping with an increase in delinquent taxpayers. As it has in Bucks and Chester, the slumping economy has hit Pennsylvania's richest county squarely in the tax coffers. For 1990, Montgomery County taxpayers owed a total of $17.7 million in delinquent school, local government and county taxes - a 35 percent increase over 1989's $13.1 million. County, school and municipal officials say it's the biggest jump they have seen in years.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sister of the student who brought the first webcam lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District two years ago has filed her own federal lawsuit, which administrators have slammed as "an attempted money-grab and a complete waste of tax dollars. " Paige Robbins, 19, of Penn Valley, alleges the district invaded her privacy when it remotely snapped pictures via a laptop in her home while she was undressed. She is the sister of Blake Robbins, 17, who as a sophomore at Harriton High School sued the Lower Merion district for invasion of privacy and agreed to a $175,000 settlement.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The three best friends started their first business when they were 12 years old, selling T-shirts. "We'd take a Sharpie and draw designs on them," recalled Austen Tom. "They sold," chimed in his buddy, Mike Robbins, laughing. At $20 a pop. Today, the entrepreneurs run an up-and-coming clothing line called Freshmen Select, peddling T-shirts, hoodies, and other apparel through online retail sites, aided by slickly produced videos and social media. Their adolescent foray into marketing is easy to remember because it wasn't that long ago. Tom and Robbins are 20, while their partner, Bryce Williamson, is 21. It is said that in business, timing is everything.
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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes, the tiniest thing can go viral. Like a cookie. A Lower Merion mom learned that this week, after her Twitter rant over a school permission slip became part of an online debate about schools, food, and parenting. "Insanity. I have to sign a permission slip so my middle schooler can eat an Oreo," wrote the woman, who identifies herself online only as Main Line Housewife. The message was soon posted on various websites and parenting blogs. So was a photo of the permission slip, sent home to explain a hands-on science activity that involved Double Stuf Oreos.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The three best friends started their first business when they were 12 years old, selling T-shirts. "We'd take a Sharpie and draw designs on them," recalled Austen Tom. "They sold," chimed in his buddy, Mike Robbins, laughing. At $20 a pop. Today, the entrepreneurs run an up-and-coming clothing line called Freshmen Select, peddling T-shirts, hoodies, and other apparel through online retail sites, aided by slickly produced videos and social media. Their adolescent foray into marketing is easy to remember because it wasn't that long ago. Tom and Robbins are 20, while their partner, Bryce Williamson, is 21. It is said that in business, timing is everything.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a year when the Alabama governor blocked schoolhouse doors in support of segregation and a March on Washington aimed to crush it, Lower Merion had its own 1963 moment. The Main Line branch of the NAACP protested that students in the Lower Merion School District's predominantly black Ardmore Avenue Elementary School were receiving an inferior education. The NAACP wanted the school closed. Wendell Holland, 61, understands why the disparity was wrong. But as a student there, the solution wasn't easy to accept.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The founder of I'm Shmacked, the firm that posted video of local teens drinking and partying online, says he wants to "hash it out" on live TV with Lower Merion School District officials who objected to the post. Arya Toufanian, 19, of Potomac, Md., defended his business today, saying he "was not at all upset about Lower Merion complaining. " Asked to comment on the situation, Lower Merion schools spokesman Doug Young declined to be drawn into a debate with Toufanian. "Our focus is on the safety and well-being of our students, and that's the bottom line," Young said.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of Lower Merion's unforgettable families has a message: Forget about us. "We're done," Michael Robbins said Wednesday. Robbins spoke minutes after his daughter Paige, 20, dropped her invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District, the same district that last year paid his son Blake $175,000 to resolve allegations that it had spied on him through a school-issued laptop. But like Blake Robbins' case, which drew an international spotlight to the district and stirred finger-pointing and contempt from parents and officials inside it, this one didn't end without a dose of theater.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of Lower Merion's unforgettable families has a message: Forget about us. "We're done," Michael Robbins said Wednesday. Robbins spoke minutes after his 20-year-old daughter Paige dropped her invasion-of-privacy lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District, the same district that last year paid his son Blake $175,000 to resolve allegations it spied on him through a school-issued laptop. But like Blake Robbins' case, which drew an international spotlight to the school district and stirred finger-pointing and contempt from parents and officials inside it, this one didn't end without a dose of theater.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sister of the student who brought the first webcam lawsuit against the Lower Merion School District two years ago has filed her own federal lawsuit, which administrators have slammed as "an attempted money-grab and a complete waste of tax dollars. " Paige Robbins, 19, of Penn Valley, alleges the district invaded her privacy when it remotely snapped pictures via a laptop in her home while she was undressed. She is the sister of Blake Robbins, 17, who as a sophomore at Harriton High School sued the Lower Merion district for invasion of privacy and agreed to a $175,000 settlement.
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