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Lower Merion School District

NEWS
June 16, 1988 | By Mary E. Charest, Special to The Inquirer
Efforts by Narberth Solicitor Morris Sheer have made the borough's general fund $4,371.75 richer. Sheer negotiated with the Lower Merion School District to split the final assets of the Narberth School Authority after its disbanding. The Lower Merion School District has directed the authority since the Narberth and Lower Merion School Districts merged in the 1960s. The school authority issued bonds in 1966 to build the Narberth Elementary School, and despite the school's closing in 1979, the authority stayed in existence to complete its commitment to the bond holders.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three Narberth residents have filed a class-action appeal against Montgomery County, the Borough of Narberth and the Lower Merion School District for taxes paid on properties that they say were illegally reassessed. The appeal, filed on Monday with the Montgomery County Board of Assessment Appeals, demands that the county, borough and school district refund all excess taxes paid on more than 100 Narberth properties. That amount exceeds $500,000, the appeal says. This is the third class-action appeal filed against the county and local municipalities.
NEWS
July 24, 2014
A review Tuesday of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's performance of Macbeth misidentified the actress who played Lady Macbeth, Susan Riley Stevens. The "Changing Skyline" column July 4 overstated the increase in votes cast for Democratic City Committee candidates in the 30th Ward. The number of people casting ballots this May was about 50 percent higher than in 2010, the previous election for Democratic City Committee. A story in some editions Wednesday misstated the date of a public session to discuss the Lower Merion School District's school-bus parking proposal.
NEWS
April 18, 2013
Dawn Klemash Age: 36   Where ya from?: Queen Village, where she moved 12 years ago from Wynnewood. She's originally from Wilkes-Barre.   What do you do?: She's the director of Schwartz Preschool, which has 46 students in Queen Village.   Said no to the suburbs: Although many families flee cities for suburban schools, Klemash and husband Ray Kresge, a social-studies teacher at Ben Franklin High, left Wynnewood when their son Jake was little because they felt the esteemed Lower Merion School District wasn't right for him. "We moved for kindergarten," said Klemash, whose son attends Meredith Elementary School in Queen Village.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis and Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The texts between the friends appeared to be about the dearth of good marijuana back when they were Main Line prep school students - and how their fledgling drug business could take off. Timothy C. Brooks asked Neil K. Scott if he had ever envisioned such success. "Only dreamed of it," Scott allegedly wrote in reply. "There is a much bigger market than just a lb each at each of these schools. " Scott, 25, of Haverford, and Brooks, 18, of Villanova, were accused Monday of being the leaders of a drug trafficking ring that sought to corner the trade across some of the western suburbs' most prominent public schools.
NEWS
March 24, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing on surveillance-law issues related to the Lower Merion School District's laptop-spying allegations will be conducted in Philadelphia's federal courthouse Monday. But no one involved in the Web-cam fracas is expected to appear. A witness list for the hearing indicates that U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (D., Pa.), who chairs the crime and drugs subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee, plans to call five national technology and law experts unaffiliated with Lower Merion schools or the family of Blake Robbins.
NEWS
March 15, 2005
HAVING GROWN up in Philadelphia but no longer living there, we are grateful that our favorite papers are on the Web so we may keep up with the news from home. We would like to make a suggestion on the proposed bus depot planned for East Falls. Let Lower Merion build the depot with the understanding that anyone living within a 1-mile radius of the site would be allowed to send their child to Lower Merion for school. This would not only enhance the educational environment for the children, but would also increase the property value of the homes in East Falls (the radius around the depot would be a de facto extension of the Lower Merion school district)
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After more than 20 years of providing child care in Ardmore, the Montgomery Early Learning Centers are on the move. The centers, which serve about 110 children from infancy through elementary-school age at two sites in Ardmore, are moving to the former Narberth Elementary School, said Fred Citron, executive director. He said the new combined location, expected to serve between 160 and 200 children, is scheduled to open Jan. 5. "We have a long history of serving the community, but the [Lower Merion]
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge has dismissed a civil rights lawsuit by some Lower Merion School District parents, students, and former students who claimed the district discriminated against them and other African American students by disproportionately and inappropriately placing them in special-education programs and in the lowest-level classes. The ruling in Amber Blunt et al v. Lower Merion School District et al was handed down Thursday by U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle 3d, who wrote that there was "no direct or circumstantial evidence of racial discrimination.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
"Webcamgate," the Lower Merion School District soap opera about two teens and two school-issued laptops that spied on them, was never supposed to be about money. But that's exactly what brought the whole screwy saga to a close yesterday - a boatload of money. The district's Board of School Directors voted unanimously to pay $610,000 to settle lawsuits filed by the families of Harriton High sophomore Blake Robbins and Lower Merion High graduate Jalil Hasan, both of whom were unknowingly photographed scores of times at home by webcams on Apple MacBooks.
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